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Were conditions for high death rates at Care Homes created on purpose?

Rosemary Frei

During the COVID-19 pandemic, people in care homes have been dying in droves.

Why is this happening? Is it simply because older adults are very vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2 and therefore it’s not unexpected that many would succumb?

Or do care homes deserve the lion’s share of the blame, such as by paying so poorly that many workers have to split their time between several facilities, spreading the virus in the process?

Alternatively, could medical experts and government bureaucrats, with the full knowledge of at least the top tier of government officials, have created conditions shortly after the pandemic struck that contribute to the high death tolls while engendering virtually no public backlash against themselves?

This article shows that the third hypothesis is highly plausible. The people who created the conditions may be unaware of, or oblivious to, their implications. But it’s also possible that at least some of them know exactly what they’re doing.

After all – seeing it from an amoral government’s point of view – the growing numbers of elderly are a big burden on today’s fiscally strained governments, because in aggregate they’re paying much less into the tax base than younger people while causing the costs of healthcare and retirement programs to skyrocket.

Here are three sets of conditions that collectively create a framework for enabling significantly boosted care-home deaths – and doing so with impunity – even while most of each set of conditions in isolation may appear to be purely for the benefit of everyone in society:

One. Bureaucrats develop extremely broad definitions of novel-coronavirus infections and outbreaks. This is coupled with the continuing presence, in a number of care homes scattered across each jurisdiction, of at least one nurse or physician who follows every letter of all definitions and rules. (Such individuals are always present in every discipline, but in the medical milieu their actions can be deliberate, deadly and very hard to detect.)

Two. Influential organizations and individuals produce hospital-care-rationing guidelines that recommend younger people receive higher priority than the elderly during the pandemic, by giving significant weight to how many years of life patients would have ahead of them if treatment is successful. Also, some guidelines bar care-home residents from being transferred to hospital.

Three. The chief coroner and leaders of the funeral, cremation and burial industries craft procedures that fundamentally change the way care-home deaths are documented and bodies dealt with. Their stated goal is to prevent overburdening of medical staff and body-storage areas during a surge in COVID-19 deaths.

They also put them into effect very quickly with no notice to the public; this gives those directly affected very limited opportunity for input or push-back.

Among the many radical changes is death certificates are no longer completed by people who care for care-home residents; instead, they are filled in by the chief coroner’s office.

Also, examination of the undisturbed death scene is prevented, as are all but a very few post-mortems and other sober second looks at the cause and mode of death.

In the background are the complicit ranks of public-health organizations, politicians, media and many other influential individuals. When the pandemic first strikes they focus on how new, dangerous and poorly understood the virus is. As one side effect, this scares many care-home staff so much they flee in fear, leaving their overwhelmed colleagues to cope.

After a short time, they also start to distract the public and victims’ loved ones from uncovering the three sets of conditions by focusing on other factors in the rash of deaths among institutionalized elderly – and by insisting the solution to everything is more testing and contact tracing, along with accelerated vaccine and anti-viral development.

This article shows how the three sets of conditions were put in place in Ontario, Canada.

Variations on these conditions very likely have been crafted in other jurisdictions in North America, Europe and elsewhere. An exclusive interview with the daughter of one of the dozens of people who died during an outbreak at an Ontario care home illustrates how the three sets of conditions work in practice.

Condition Set One: Broad Definitions of Novel-coronavirus Infections and Outbreaks

At the start of the novel-coronavirus epidemic in Ontario, formal definitions of infections and care-home-outbreaks weren’t issued, at least not publicly.

Rather, in late March Chief Medical Officer of Health for Ontario, Dr. David Williams, and the Associate Chief Medical Officer of Health, Dr. Barbara Yaffe, described the criteria verbally during their daily press briefings.

An outbreak should be declared when two or three people show symptoms of infection with the novel coronavirus, they said.

Also, polymerase chain reaction testing for viral RNA wasn’t required for confirmation.

This is a loosened version of criteria used in the province prior to the novel-coronavirus epidemic. These previous criteria defined an outbreak as either: two people in the same area of a facility developing symptoms within two days of each other (making their infections ‘epidemiologically linked’) and at least one of them testing positive for viral RNA; or three people in the same area developing symptoms within two days of each other.

On March 30 the Ontario health ministry released new rules for defining and managing care-home outbreaks (with the document confusingly dated April 1). Staff at all Ontario care nursing homes were trained on the new rules via webinars two days later, on April 1.

The new rules included an even broader outbreak definition: the presence of only one person with just one symptom of a SARS-CoV-2 infection. Outbreaks were deemed confirmed when just one resident or staff member tested positive; subsequently, every resident in the care home showing any coronavirus-infection symptoms is deemed to have COVID-19.

Notably, however, there wasn’t a symptom list in the document. Dr. Williams said on April 1 during that day’s press briefing they deliberately did not include a list of infection.

This is because:

“to look for those symptoms [in the rest of the care-home residents after the initial case is identified] is a challenge, particularly in seniors,” […] “They may not mount a fever, they may have a lot of other symptoms and they may not have obvious symptoms. [Rather,] any change in their health condition really [can be considered a symptom].”

A few minutes later Dr. Williams added:

I don’t mind false alarms. [As a result of the looser outbreak criteria] the numbers [of outbreaks that] we see might be[come] quite [a bit] larger …. [But that’s because w]e want to ramp up the sensitivity. [That] means the number of outbreaks will go up, because we’ve widened the definition.”

One week later, April 8, a Provincial Testing Guidance Update was issued. It included the following list of symptoms (most of which are highly non-specific): fever, any new or worsening acute respiratory illness symptom – for example cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, runny nose or sneezing, nasal congestion, hoarse voice, difficulty swallowing – and pneumonia.

The document also listed several symptoms that are “atypical” but “should be considered, particularly in people over 65” [italics added]: unexplained fatigue/malaise, acutely altered mental status and inattention (i.e., delirium), falls, acute functional decline, worsening of chronic conditions, digestive symptoms (e.g., nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain), chills, headaches, croup, unexplained tachycardia, decreased blood pressure, unexplained hypoxia (even if mild) and lethargy.

Then on April 22 the province produced the first COVID-19-screening guidelines for care homes. It’s broadly similar to the April 8 document, except that two or more of some of the symptoms – for example sore throat, runny nose and sneezing, stuffed-up nose, diarrhea – need to be present for a person to be deemed positive.

On May 2 a new testing guidance and a new screening guide were released. Both documents concede that if a person has only a runny or stuffed-up nose, “consideration should be given to other underlying reasons for these symptoms such as seasonal allergies and post-nasal drip.”

They also narrow the definition of falls considered diagnostic of a novel-coronavirus infection in people over 65, to falls that are unexplained or increasing in number.

However, they add to the symptom list another three that are very non-specific: a decrease in sense of taste, abdominal pain and pink eye.

There are enormous implications to having overly broad definitions of symptoms and outbreaks, particularly in combination with other rules put in place at the beginning of the epidemic.

Broad definitions very likely are used in many other jurisdictions around the world, albeit perhaps masked by the use of somewhat different terms.

First, in Ontario, in every facility with an outbreak, every resident with even just one symptom is defined as being a ‘probable’ COVID-19 case. This applies whether these residents had an inconclusive or negative viral-RNA test result – or even weren’t tested at all.

Second, the cause of death of everyone who had been diagnosed with a SARS-CoV-2 infection is recorded as being COVID-19. This is a dictate of the World Health Organization and is followed throughout North America, Europe and elsewhere.

Third, COVID-19-attributed deaths are deemed ‘natural’ by new rules released by the chief coroner on April 9 (see ‘Condition Set Three,’ below). In all but an extremely small number of cases, natural deaths are exempt from any further investigations or post-mortems. (Over the last 30 years post-mortems have become rare, but to almost completely remove the possibility is another matter.)

Taken together, this may explain what the daughter of a woman who died along with dozens of others, during a COVID-19 outbreak at an Ontario care home experienced. The daughter granted the author an exclusive interview on May 13. (Under a pseudonym to shield her from possible repercussions.)

Diane Plaxton said in the interview that on April 1 she received a shocking and unexpected phone call from her mother’s care home.

“Your mother’s declining. She’s been having loose bowels and lots of diarrhea. There’s a DNR on her chart. And we’re not sending anyone to the hospital. [Likely because of ‘Condition Set Two,’ below] We’re going to have to put her on palliative care,” Plaxton recalls the head nurse telling her in a cold, uncaring voice.

Plaxton was stunned. She knew about her mother’s diarrhea: it was from bowel-cleansing meds she’d been on for about nine days, after being diagnosed with a clogged bowel. Plaxton told the nurse that if her mother seemed to be declining it probably was from the diarrhea and resultant dehydration.

She suggested to the head nurse that she give mother IV rehydration. The nurse refused, saying it would “just prolong the inevitable.”

The head nurse didn’t say the word COVID-19, nor tell Plaxton the home had been declared to have an outbreak that day.

She also didn’t mention that on March 30 the province had issued new rules on novel-coronavirus infections and outbreaks, then trained all of Ontario’s care-home staff on them via webinar April 1. As described above, the rules included very broad definitions of SARS-CoV-2 infections and outbreaks.

Therefore the nurse could well have been complying fully with the new rules by diagnosing Plaxton’s mother with a novel-coronavirus infection based on her having diarrhea alone (and without telling Plaxton any of this).

Furthermore, since transfer to a hospital was not an option (as per ‘Condition Set Two’) and since COVID-19 is deemed to be very frequently fatal in the elderly, this may be why the head nurse pushed Plaxton so hard to consent to palliative care for her mother.

Shaken but unbowed, Plaxton asked the head nurse to let her speak to the nurse who had been directly caring for her mother.

Fortunately, that second nurse was kind, and agreed that palliative care was not appropriate for Plaxton’s mother. She agreed instead to allow her to not take the bowel-cleaning meds, and to coax her to eat and drink to recover her fluids and strength. She also said she’d keep an eye on the slight fever Plaxton’s mother had.

Over the next few days this plan worked, and the nurse told Plaxton she needn’t worry.

That’s why it hit Plaxton like a gut punch when on April 10 she got a call from another nurse, who was panicking. She told Plaxton her mom was struggling to breathe and “going fast.”

The nurse said the care home couldn’t transfer her to the hospital. She asked Plaxton’s permission for the doctor to give her mother “a shot to ease her passing.”

(The nurse didn’t tell Plaxton what ‘the shot’ was. But it very likely was morphine, which is routinely used to relieve severe pain. A high enough dose of morphine slows people’s breathing and hastens their death.)

Plaxton was reeling. She immediately consulted with her sister; together they decided to give consent for the shot. Three hours later their mother was dead.

Condition Set Two: Hospital-care-rationing Guidelines

In mid-March, not long before Plaxton’s mother died, treatment-rationing guidelines for during the pandemic started to proliferate.

For example, on March 21 the UK’s National Institute for Clinical Excellence produced its guidelines.

They’re based on a frailty score and on mortality probabilities across different age groups for pneumonia and underlying cardiovascular or respiratory diseases.

On March 23 the paper “Fair allocation of scarce medical resources in the time of Covid-19” was published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine. The paper’s first recommendation calls for:

maximizing the number of patients that survive treatment with a reasonable life expectancy.”

(Interestingly, the paper’s lead author, Ezekiel Emmanuel, MD, PhD, is an oncologist, bioethicist and senior fellow at the Center for American Progress. The centre is secretive about its funders but according to a 2011 investigation in The Nation its supporters included dozens of giant corporations ranging from Boeing to Walmart. Today, retired general Wesley Clark and executive VP of global investment firm Blackstone Henry James are among the organization’s trustee advisory board members.)

On March 27, the equally influential Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) published “A framework for rationing ventilators and critical-care beds during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

The paper’s authors assert that:

[y]ounger individuals should receive priority, not because of any claims about social worth or utility, but because they are the worst off, in the sense that they have had the least opportunity to live through life’s stages.”

Ontario Health published guidelines for hospital-treatment rationing on March 28, albeit not publicly. (To this day the government hasn’t made the protocol public, nor disclosed whether or when they implemented it.)

At that time a crush of COVID-19 patients crowding Ontario hospitals wasn’t a realistic possibility for at least the short or medium terms (contrary to the pandemic-curve theoretical modelling), because all elective hospital procedures and surgeries had been cancelled or indefinitely postponed.

Toronto Star reporter Jennifer Yan obtained a copy of the Ontario treatment-triaging document and wrote in a March 29 article that:

[u]nder the triage protocol, long-term-care patients who meet specific criteria will also no longer be transferred to hospitals.”

Then on April 10, the Canadian Medical Association adopted all the recommendations by Dr. Ezekiel and his co-authors in their New England Journal of Medicine paper, and advised Canadian physicians to follow them.

The Canadian Medical Association statement (whose authors were not listed) asserted that “the current situation, unfortunately, does not allow for” the time for Canadian experts to create their own recommendations.

This is tendentious. Canadian healthcare providers and researchers have access to as much information about COVID-19 as do others around the world. In addition, many had direct clinical experience with a close cousin of the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV, in 2003.

Indeed four Canadians co-authored an ethical framework for guiding decision-making during a pandemic that was based on their experience with SARS and published in 2006. They made no mention of age as a criterion for treatment triaging in that framework.

On April 17 the Canadian federal government released information to guide clinicians in rationing healthcare resources during the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic. Unlike at least some other COVID-19-related guidelines issued in the same period, it was not accompanied by a press release; therefore it has flown under the public radar.

The document includes an emphasis on age-based rationing. It also explicitly discourages transfer of care-home residents to hospitals:

Long term care (LTC)[care-home] facilities and home care services will be encouraged to care for COVID-19 patients in place and may be asked to take on additional non-COVID-19 patients/clients to help relieve pressure on hospitals”

This is underlined in another place in the document:

If COVID-19 does develop in LTC facility residents, they should be cared for within the facility if at all possible, to preserve hospital capacity.”

Prohibiting transfer to hospital drastically narrows the treatment options available to care-home residents.

There have been transfers of care-home residents to hospitals in Canada during the COVID-19 crisis, but until very recently they have been by far the exception.

(Instead, starting in mid-March as part of the clearing out of hospitals to make room for a putative surge in COVID-19 patients, thousands of elderly people were transferred from hospitals to care homes. This likely also contributed to the care-home death toll. More than one journalist has compared care homes to the Diamond Princess cruise ship: virus incubators with people trapped inside.)

All of this may well be why Plaxton was told by nurses at the care home that her mother couldn’t be transferred to hospital.

This also has played out at other care homes.

The medical director of the Pinecrest nursing home in Bobcaygeon, two hours’ drive northeast of Toronto, strongly advised residents’ family members against considering hospital transfer.

The Globe and Mail reported on March 29 that Dr. Michelle Snarr wrote families on March 21 (which was the day after three of the home’s residents tested positive for SARS-CoV-2) and raised the spectre of significant suffering and possible death if the elderly people were put on ventilators.

Dr. Snarr reiterated this in a March 30 television interview.

Once we heard it was COVID, we all knew it was going to run like wildfire through the facility […] The reason I sent the email was to give them a heads-up that this is not normal times. Under normal times, we would send people to the hospital if that was the family’s wishes, but we knew that was not going to be possible, knowing that so many people were going to all get sick at once and also knowing the only way to save a life from COVID is with a ventilator. And to put a frail, elderly person on a ventilator, that’s cruel.

[In another interview Dr. Snarr said they weren’t outright refusing hospital transfers.]

The last death attributed to COVID-19 at Pinecrest occurred on April 8; by then, 29 of the home’s 65 residents had perished.

“I’ve never had four deaths in a day at any nursing home I’ve worked at,” Dr. Stephen Oldridge, one of the physicians working at the home, was quoted as saying in the March 29 Globe and Mail article. “You feel helpless. Because there’s nothing you can do other than support them, give them morphine and make them comfortable.”

Dr. Oldridge told CBC a similar narrative on April 1:

“There is no vaccine, we have no effective treatment other than supportive care for these folks, and obviously there’s no cure. So when the infection takes hold in their lungs, in this elderly population we can just make them comfortable.”

Still other media reports indicate that care-home residents’ families in Canada have denied the option of transfer to hospital during the pandemic even if the residents are relatively young, do not have a DNR, and both they and their families want the option of a transfer. Instead, they are pressured to put DNRs in place. This also is happening elsewhere, such as in the UK.

Hugh Scher, a Toronto lawyer who’s been involved in some of Canada’s highest-profile end-of-life cases, strongly opposes this. He told the author in a telephone interview:

The notion that long-term-care-home or nursing-home medical directors can tell residents and their families that they can’t or shouldn’t be transferred to hospital if they need treatment for COVID or anything else – I don’t agree with that.

[…]

[But unfortunately] there’s now an aggressive push to say, ‘Granny’s already ninety-five … and sending her to hospital for a cough or a runny nose isn’t going to improve her underlying condition. And so she should be made comfortable and left to die.’

Condition Set Three: New Rules Surrounding Death Certificates and Removal and Disposition of Bodies

On April 9 the Chief Coroner for Ontario, Dr. Dirk Huyer, released rules for an ‘expedited death response’ in handling and disposition of bodies of people who die in care homes and hospitals.

The stated goal was to prevent infection spread, overburdening of medical staff, and overfilling of hospital morgues and body-storage areas in care homes in the event of a surge in deaths during the pandemic.

The new procedures were created jointly by Dr. Huyer’s office, the Ontario Ministry of Government and Consumer Services and the Bereavement Authority of Ontario (the province’s funeral-home, cremation-services and cemetery self-regulatory body).

They are a drastic sea change in the way deaths are handled in the province. Yet they were launched extremely rapidly with the only “surge” in sight one in mathematical models, and a significant body-storage-space problem based on hard data nowhere on the horizon (and still a low probability).

The new procedures went into effect immediately on April 9. Then over the next three days (the Easter long weekend), Dr. Huyer and the registrar of the Bereavement Authority of Ontario led webinars on them for staff of hospitals and care homes across the province.

“We pushed it [writing and releasing the new rules] a little more quickly than maybe was necessary because it’s a brand-new process and there’s thousands of people involved,” Dr. Huyer told Toronto Star columnist Rosie DiManno in explaining the haste.

As part of the new rules, the chief coroner’s office now completes the death certificates of every person who dies in long-term-care homes. The office also completes some death certificates of people who die in hospitals. Up until April 9, and for good reason, death certificates in Ontario were filled in by the physicians or nurse practitioners who cared for the people before they died.

In addition, as also noted in ‘Condition Set One’ above, COVID-19-attributed deaths are deemed ‘natural’ by the new rules. And all “natural” deaths are virtually exempt from any further investigations and post-mortems.

(Dr. Huyer was quoted in a May 18 Globe and Mail article as saying “a number” of COVID-19-attributed death investigations have been started – including that of a man whose daughter believes he died because of neglect at a care home and who asked the coroner’s office to investigate – but that he doesn’t know what that number is.)

Dr. Huyer said, in a phone interview:

“All of these things were added during this period of time to allow not only a timely approach but also an efficient approach to be able to ensure that people proceed to burial or cremation in a timely way without requiring extra storage space,”

Yet it was only 10 months ago that the official report on the high-profile Wettlaufer inquiry was released. It calls for many more checks and balances surrounding care – and more rather than less time and transparency in determining and documenting the causes of death.

Just 18 of the report’s 91 recommendations have been implemented. (The inquiry probed the killing in southwestern Ontario by nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer of eight people, attempted murder of several others and aggravated assault of two more. All but two of the victims were LTCH residents.)

Moreover, the April 2020 rules also dictate that families must contact a funeral home within one hour of a hospital death and within three hours of a care-home death. The bodies are to be taken to the funeral home extremely rapidly, and from there to cremation and burial as quickly as possible.

This journalist wrote about the rules in a May 11 article.

Diane Plaxton found and read online the May 11 article. She suddenly understood more of what took place before and after her mother’s April 10 death.

She and this journalist connected, and the May 13 interview ensued.

Plaxton related, in that interview, that three hours after she got off the phone with her dying mother on April 10, a nurse called and matter-of-factly said her mother was dead. She asked Plaxton to call a funeral home.

And about an hour later, while Plaxton was still reeling, another nurse called and again told her to contact a funeral home.

“I got off the phone. That’s when I flew off the handle,” she told the author in the May 13 interview. “It’s like they’re treating her [body] like a piece of garbage: ‘Get her out of here! Ger her out of here!’”

As if that wasn’t enough trauma, at the funeral home four days later she saw COVID-19 listed as the cause of her mother’s death. Plaxton believes what really killed her mother was the combination of dehydration and chronic diseases including asthma; her shortness of breath on April 10 may have been an asthma attack, Plaxton surmises.

Making matters even worse, the funeral director told her she couldn’t take a copy or photo of the ‘Cause of Death’ form. He said she’d have to request a copy from the government and it could take months to arrive.

But the funeral director also commiserated with Plaxton. He was incredulous that her mother had gone from dehydrated to dead so fast. He also was bewildered by the requirements such as bodies having to be picked up in haste and arrangements for cremation and burial also having to be made extremely quickly.

“I’m just taking orders from the top down,” Plaxton recalls the funeral director telling her.

That’s the third of the three sets of conditions that can enable high death rates in care homes.

The three sets are the work of officials, experts and bureaucrats who – while being seen to serve the public interest and who could be unaware of, or oblivious to, the implications of the conditions – may in fact have hidden intentions.

Even if the latter is true, there’s little chance the perpetrators will be caught or punished.

On May 19 the Ontario premier announced that an independent commission will probe why so many people have died in the province’s care homes. This journalist believes it’s very unlikely the commission’s mandate will include scrutinizing the sets of conditions described in this article.

Perhaps the most elegant element of all is that just one or two people working at any given care home can suffice to translate the sets of conditions into actions – or inaction – that can be deadly for residents. And they’d probably be the only ones held responsible in the unlikely event any of this ever comes to light.

It’s all as simple as one, two, three.

Rosemary Frei has an Msc in molecular biology from a faculty of medicine and was a freelance medical writer and journalist for 22 years. She is now an independent investigative journalist. You can read her article on The Seven Steps from Pandemic to Totalitarianism here, watch and listen to an interview she gave on COVID-19, and follow her on Twitter.

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Paul
Paul
Jul 17, 2020 8:41 PM

Has anyone looked at the world economic forums website to see the comprehensive covid action plan that elaborates 200+ steps that help subvert national borders and assert this eugenics agenda world wide and usher in UN agenda 21/30? I am sure it outlines this very “phenomenon” in detail and prescribes the death panel through facist ideological endorsements by corporate and local municipalities bypassing the antiquated selected officials and their old world authorities. Worth looking up even though you have to register on the site in order to view the elaborate plans of the psychopathic elite scamming the world into “new” order through seemingly organic chaos.

John Manley
John Manley
Jun 29, 2020 6:06 PM

I’m trying to submit an article to [email protected] (that is time-sensitve) but the emails keep on bouncing back. Can you email at [email protected] or call 519-508-1624

Ekim
Ekim
Jun 25, 2020 7:13 PM

Why are you asking us. ?You are the journalist . You know it happened why don’t you just report it.

James
James
Jun 18, 2020 12:13 AM

Ontario Government is misleading the public when they give their daily covid case numbers. They state every day the number of ‘new’ cases. This is a lie!!!! See for yourself:
https://www.ontario.ca/page/how-ontario-is-responding-covid-19

For a description of the ‘number of cases’ see footnote #1
“^ Number of confirmed cases reported to date in iPHIS by Ontario’s 32 Public Health Units (PHUs) by Toronto Public Health in the Coronavirus Rapid Entry System (CORES) and by Ottawa Public Health in The COVID-19 Ottawa Database (The COD) and Middlesex-London COVID-19 Case and Contact Management tool (CCMtool), including resolved and deceased cases. PHUs may publicly report on cases prior to updating the data in iPHIS. In the event of a discrepancy between iPHIS cases and cases publicly reported by PHUs, data reported by PHUs should be considered the most up to date.”

Also take a look at footnote #7
“Deaths are determined by using the outcome field in iPHIS, CORES, CCMtool or The COD. Any case marked “Fatal” is included in the deaths data. Deaths are included whether or not COVID-19 was determined to be a contributing or underlying cause of death as indicated in the iPHIS field “Type of Death”.

So the total cases = the number of confirmed positive cases + the number of resolved cases + the number of deaths!!!!
To see a breakdown of the total cases go to
https://data.ontario.ca/dataset/status-of-covid-19-cases-in-ontario
Currently there are 2410 confirmed positive cases, 27784 resolved cases , and 2550 deaths bringing a total of 32744 total cases.
The highest number of confirmed cases that Ontario had was 5675 on April 25th!!!!

Mario
Mario
Jun 17, 2020 9:58 PM

The same happened in Italy: a way to get rid of retired care-needing people who are considered a burden by “economists”…
This is a war OF terror, and a WAR ON PEOPLE.

cathanna
cathanna
Jun 17, 2020 7:21 AM

Before I saw Miss Frei on Corbett Report, I thought about how there may have been another hidden agenda of Covid19 (one of several agendas) – to euthanize many elderly….or at least use them as a test case. I mentioned it to family but they thought I was nuts. It does seem like this entire Covid19 has been about Globalists testing the systems to see where the vulnerabilities are. Many elderly in homes, have little if any family. They are vulnerable targets. How would YOU like that to happen to you?

Phase II may be happening soon; as they prepare for the “final solution” as Bill Gates called it on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.

Ursula Stouffer
Ursula Stouffer
Jun 7, 2020 9:00 AM

An additional factor, which hasn’t been talked about, are forced flu vaccinations of elderly in senior’s home. Studies have shown that you’re much more likely to get really sick and die from Covid 19 if you’ve had a flu shot. And the elderly had the extra strong flu shot in the fall!
What usually happens is, that they all get the flu shot in the fall, and then there is an epidemic of the flu in the spring, and a whole lot of the residents succumb to the flu. Only this year it was even worse. And yes, I do believe it is on purpose, to get rid of those old people.

John C. A. Manley
John C. A. Manley
Jun 5, 2020 4:24 PM

I’ve made multiple posts on MuchAdoAboutCorona.ca referencing back to this article:
 

 Thank you for all your hard work, Ms. Frei.

Rosemary Frei
Rosemary Frei
Jun 5, 2020 10:57 PM

Thanks very much John!
I just read your posts – they’re very well-written.
I appreciate very much your efforts to spread the word about this problematic aspect of the Covid mystery and about other aspects of it as well.

David J. Webb Sr.
David J. Webb Sr.
Jun 1, 2020 6:49 PM

Think the fictional program MASH. Think Major Frank Burns.
What would Dr. Burns do in a situation like this?
Because the world is full of people just like Dr. Burns.
You are wrong about one thing only. There is a treatment that might work.
It is not conventional medicine where prescriptions are made and for that reason only Doctors in league with the drug industry are reluctant to use it.
The common cold is a relative of this virus.
The only “cure” that works is to poison the playing field. That means giving a substance into the cells that all versions of the disease have trouble surviving.
Zinc is one such chemical and used in conjunction with a catalyst like Selenium and a common antibiotic some people have beat it out. The same holistic doctors are using doses of C and D3. They are also using Vitamin A.
This is not acceptable medicine to the people in league with the pharmacy world.
Neither is flooding the stores with the proper antiviral light in the form of the proper spectrum UltraViolet light used in hospitals to sterilize a room.
I have used full spectrum daylight flourescent bulbs in my house for years. It has the Ultraviolet light built in.
Daylight is the best in a nursing facility and it is not perfect. That means expose the patients to sunlight as part of a change in the conditions of the home. Be sure to keep them hydrated.
I am no doctor. But Dr. Bernsein is using a similar treatment on 85 patients with 4 other holistic school doctors. None of them has been hospitalized. All are getting well.
The Doctor Burns of this world want an expensive cure. Not one like I have described.
The politicians in this country(USA) want to cull the herd of Social Security people.
I conclude this by the way they are treating the disease or not.
I have lived a short time recovering from a staph infection 3 years ago in a nursing home. The food there is terrible. Worse than any food I ever had in the US Military.
Anyone that puts there relatives in such a place should be made to live there.
That might open their immoral eyes.
Meantime back in politics our “friends” in Congress want to reduce Medicare and Medicaid and Social Security. I say give them the boot and make them live on a typical social security check for a year.
 
 
 

Kathy
Kathy
May 31, 2020 2:54 PM

This is the most disturbing part of the whole Covid story.
It seems highly likely that this could well have been orchestrated. It would be so neglectful and such folly of procedure to have occurred otherwise. The stories coming out of Canada Italy Spain US and the UK are horrendous. Old people neglected with few staff and little compassion. Death certificates issued Covid regardless of real cause of death. Story’s of abuse in such places has been rife for years now but at least family were able to visit and to notice if . There are good care homes but there are so many owned by companies who have realized there is little profit in it. Years of employing people who dare not criticize or complain for fear of losing jobs has left a fearful, complacent and pliant staff. The world has become a very dark place I fear.

Pokwok
Pokwok
May 31, 2020 3:20 AM

I just want to say, this is fantastic journalism Ms Frei. I imagine it’s thankless work for the most part.

I’ve had to cut myself off from most local media – it’s become blood boiling and deeply unpleasant to suffer through. But as I’ve gone back to work and the city is slowly waking up again, among friends and coworkers here in Quebec there’s been a lot of rumors and speculation about what the hell has been going on in these nursing homes. My parents told me an anecdote of somebody they know from their congregation who’s mother died in a nursing home during our main lockdown in Montreal – the details of that story line up with what I’ve just read in this article. Obviously I haven’t done the digging on how these conditions came about here in Quebec, but I expect it’s a pretty similar sequence of events if not exactly the same as what happened in our neighboring province.

It’s just twisted. I’m reminded of some experiences from my youth – in my catholic high school they made us do community service hours, and one of the things me and my friends did was volunteer at a local nursing home (a pretty rough one, relatively speaking). We were just teenagers meant to give company to some of the residents, many of whom were either neglected by or lacked family, so they had no young people to socialize with. That place was just a constant rotation of all the symptoms they’re now identifying as covid. And tons of those folks really had nobody on their side – just them and the staff, and occasionally some volunteers like us high schoolers passing through.

I mean… do the math on that. It’s chilling.

Right at the beginning of our lockdown, I went to drop off some things with my cousins. My aunt and uncle were there and were already sucked into the media hysteria big time. They were telling me they had to berate some “sense” into their elderly and sickly father (my grandfather in law?), who was convinced this was a plot to wipe out the seniors right from the start, even before covid panic had taken hold of the city. They were telling me how demented he was, that they were making sure he stayed locked at home, that he follows the rules… That he stays alone. They were really worked up and flustered about how crazy they thought he was being. At the time I chuckled to myself and thought “he’s probably tapping into more truth than you guys are”.

I find that whole exchange a lot less amusing two months later.

All these things are starting to sink in, and the picture of what’s really happened here is starting to become clearer. And it’s fuckin’ dreadful man… My Grandma’s in a retirement community in BC, and all her nearby family are definitely “she’s in safe hands, we have excellent healthcare here in Canada” types. I’ve had urges to pack up and just start driving to her. But I’m not even sure what I would do exactly.

Mishko
Mishko
May 30, 2020 10:36 PM

A sudden and “act of god” external cause that causes the medical PTB to scramble and then
delivers results like austerity on steroids would. I mean, come on.
Does not come across as legit AT ALL. WTF

David G. Horsman
David G. Horsman
May 30, 2020 7:52 AM

OT: At the end of a hard day… I like to crack a can of Belching Beaver Peanut Butter Milk Stout.
Writing is thirsty work!
It’s probably made in China and just bottled here. How? Using giant beer tankers.

David G. Horsman
David G. Horsman
May 30, 2020 7:56 AM

Nope. Made in California using recycled fracking water. I recognize the taste.

David G. Horsman
David G. Horsman
May 30, 2020 7:28 AM

The new rules included an even broader outbreak definition: the presence of only one person with just one symptom of a SARS-CoV-2 infection. comment: which is clearly absurb to even a layman. As a precaution or so to refuse treatment?Also, some guidelines bar care-home residents from being transferred to hospital.comment. This is a blatant deliberate violation of Canada’s Charter of Rights. Age discrimination cum eugenics? Euthanasia?What about capacity management by adding the words “if full”? Outright refusal?Long term care (LTC)[care-home] facilities and home care services will
be encouraged to care for COVID-19 patients in place and may be asked to
take on additional non-COVID-19 patients/clients to help relieve
pressure on hospitals” comment: I was simply horrified to learn this. Was there even internal quarantine areas? What about shifts?More than one journalist has compared care homes to the Diamond Princess cruise ship. comment: because even a high school kid would see the problem.  Dr. Stephen Oldridge, one of the physicians working at the home, was quoted as saying in the March 29 Globe and Mail article. “You feel helpless. Because there’s nothing you can do other than support them, give them morphine and make them comfortable.”comment: LIAR!!! A proper quarantine can use oxygen. Instead, they are pressured to put DNRs in place. This also is happening elsewhere, such as in the UK.comment: convicted by their own words and actions. Up until April 9, and for good reason, death certificates in Ontario were filled in by the physicians or nurse practitioners who cared for the people before they died.comment: How long does it take to fill out a death certificate? 5 minutes if people are dieing around you.And all “natural” deaths are virtually exempt from any further investigations and post-mortems.comment: which is irrelevant and irresponsible under the circumstances. Autopsies are extremely important with a new pathogen. The bodies are to be taken to the funeral home extremely rapidly, and from there to cremation and burial as quickly as possible.comment: who has insurance or a new will? “It’s like they’re treating her [body] like a piece of garbage”comment: none.That’s the third of the three sets of conditions that can enable high death rates in care homes.comment: That’s the third of the three sets of conditions that constitute high crimes and treason.What’s to discuss?

David G. Horsman
David G. Horsman
May 30, 2020 7:30 AM

Massive format copy failure and useless edit box. I do apologize.

Wilmers31
Wilmers31
May 30, 2020 5:03 AM

today’s fiscally strained governments,

They are only fiscally constrained because they spend truckloads of money on the wrong at not productive things. Money spent on Afghanistan – bad decision. How many wounded vets will have to be funded for 5 decades?
Syria and Iraq, worth the dime?
Destroying Libya? Good move? Gaddafi was a villain but better than the current civil war. What did Libya cost the US and UK?
Trident, conquering and domineering space = financial lunacy.

Wilmers31
Wilmers31
May 30, 2020 5:15 AM
Reply to  Wilmers31

Was called away so finish here:

They know exactly what they are doing. The institutions for the mentally unpredictable which have all been shut 20/30 years ago, have shown us exactly what would be happening: Neglect on a large scale, because in our economic competitive environment the parents of those who need constant care cannot provide it while they are alive and certainly not when they are dead.

Some mentally unpredictable get into a forensic institution after they have murdered someone, but in general the population has to endure problematic situations. Children are desensitized when they have to see these people in the street. It’s just cheaper to not have institutions and burden the people.

With most people having problems making money (from wages) from about 50 years of age when they still might have 35 years in front of them – there is a problem. People with capital are better off but what they use is usually not available for the next generation.

SteveX
SteveX
May 29, 2020 6:01 AM

The title of this article has been MY question for quite a while, now…

‘Cuz there’s the creepyweird phenomenon in New York of hospitals being required to take Covid19 transfer patients from hospitals, as if somebody were trying to spread the infection among the most susceptible.

Utterly. SENSEless.

But if that was a cue to be rully, rully suspicious, I had already begun to entertain the suspicion that this might be, in part, a move against the burgeoning overhang of elders who can’t be easily supported by a dwindling birth-rate supply of youngsters. (In this era of population implosion in western civilization.) You know, the eugenics faction of the tribe that Bill Gates runs with, as highlighted by James Corbett.

That, and the unsolicited “DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) orders. Who the flyin’ FiretrUCK has the right!…

Moreover, the startlingly large discrepancy in death rates — assuming the probability that death-rate reporting is equally corrupt from one state to the next — has been persistent over a period of time sufficient for any factors idiosyncratic to one state or another to largely equalize with others. Thus does the situation become most unsettlingly anomalous. Unless certain states are deliberately inflating their death rates more than others… Just. can’t. rule. anything. out. here.

Especially considering how lopsided the death rates are by predominant political party, here in the U. S., with democratic states having the highest death rates, by far. (An’ I ain’t tryin’ to make a political thing out of this; it’s just a matter of FACTUAL observation. Plenty Republicans went along with this bullspit; I mean, if we had a real he-man renegade swamp-cleaner president like Trumpenstein, would any of this be happening?)

WorldParole
WorldParole
May 29, 2020 3:54 PM
Reply to  SteveX

https://youtu.be/JepSFaEWvfs

“I am an essential worker.”

Maching
Maching
Jun 17, 2020 1:18 PM
Reply to  SteveX
SteveX
SteveX
May 29, 2020 5:17 AM

Hellooo folks!—

Dr. Ezekiel Emmanuel — mentioned in the article above — is the brother of Rahm “Never let a crisis go to waste” Emmanuel, Obama’s first chief of staff, and then mayor of my fair metropolis, Chicago.

Creepy, eh?

Wilmers31
Wilmers31
May 30, 2020 5:16 AM
Reply to  SteveX

He was also in the clink for selling a seat, wasn’t he?

WorldParole
WorldParole
May 29, 2020 2:26 AM

I was hoping to hear more, Ms Frei, of these separate buildings used and built specifically for “Covid positive” people.

It would also be interesting to juxtapose the data on Covid positive isolated to patients who have had regular visits from family or a disciplinary record.

Funny the correlation between contracting this “disease” and one having a next of kin.

I mentioned weeks ago in an OffG thread about these “black site” programs where I believe these experimental protocols have been used to euthanize the elderly. I’m happy to see this beautiful investigative prose. Good job.

Caltrop
Caltrop
May 29, 2020 12:43 AM

5G – “Radiation induced pneumonia” 17 minute mark

It’s time to break down whats happened so far?

WorldParole
WorldParole
May 29, 2020 2:49 AM
Reply to  Caltrop

I hope a huge solar storm wipes clean the smart city infrastructure.

Yohannan
Yohannan
May 31, 2020 7:35 AM
Reply to  WorldParole

It will eventually. I’ve been on an intense spiritual path starting around age 12/13 (started meditating, trying to improve self’s character then, etc.) and am now in my 40’s. Anyways, I’ve received a lot of messages–mostly via dreams, but some during deep meditation–about probable future.

One of the things I’ve been shown is a very powerful Solar outburst. Come to find out scientifically, that this is pretty cyclical and happens every 12, 000 years or so, which is why so many ancestors of different cultures blame the Sun for catastrophe.

Along those lines, I highly recommend Ben Davidson/Suspicious Observers (Y.T.) and their cyclical catastrophe series. Scientists like Anthony Perrat and others talk about the Sun doing occasional super outbursting and how there is evidence geologically and anthropologically of this.

There is part of me that is looking forward to this, because it will be the only thing that can greatly weaken the stranglehold of the psychopathic plutocrats on the neck of humanity. (At the same time, I know it’s going to be immensely challenging, and I have no wish to see anyone suffer, nor to suffer myself).

Zen Priest
Zen Priest
May 28, 2020 4:17 PM

Can anyone say with a straight face that this isn’t murder?
At least entertain the idea?
Instead of smirking at how ‘conspiracy theorist’ this idea is?
When in the last century alone millions upon millions of innocents were murdered directly, and indirectly (both intentionally) by malevolent forces?
This is fact, and yet they smirk at YOU for even thinking it could happen again! To us!
Shame on them. May they all rot in hell.

Charlotte Russe
Charlotte Russe
May 27, 2020 8:57 PM

THE MORE THE MERRIER

Anyone who knows anything about US nursing homes are aware most facilities are owned by the most
predatory creatures. Nursing homes are purchased based on bed capacity. The more the merrier for the owner, that is…

Nursing home facilities represent the worst aspects of US healthcare. Patients are brazenly neglected and abused. If you’re interested in spending your last days being mistreated and having your life savings absconded then a nursing home is the place for you.

That’s why it was no surprise to learn Mario Cuomo’s policies regarding COVID-19 and nursing home facilities resulted in more than 7,000 deaths. Little interest is given to elderly-care, especially during the final stages of life.

Most are relegated to nursing homes when they’re incapable of living independently and do not have the wherewithal to hire 24 hour nursing care so they can remain at home.

As a side note, the US Government automatically pays all COVID-19 health claims out of Medicare so that explains why most diagnoses and death certificates are labeled coronavirus.

Another important point, in mid-January the first cases of COVID-19 surfaced in a Washington State nursing home where numerous deaths occurred. At that time, it was understood the elderly and those with comorbidities were the most vulnerable. Assiduous care should have been given at all other nursing home facilities and VA Hospitals to protect this fragile demographic. If this had been done thousands of deaths would’ve been avoided, and perhaps the lockdowns for the healthier younger segment of the population might not have been necessary.

It’s a goddamn shame, it takes a pandemic for mainstream media news to show interest in the horrific
treatment given to the elderly at nursing homes, but even this coverage and the sudden concern for all older adults is disingenuous since its being weaponized for the 2020 presidential election and will never result in genuine healthcare reforms.

tonyopmoc
tonyopmoc
May 27, 2020 7:22 PM

I have banned myself from Facebook since the end of March, cos my views with my friends were not going down too well. I have never posted my phone number on Facebook, so how did he get it? (We do have a few close friends – but I do not give anyone’s phone number away to a friend, unless there is an extremely good reason (like we are all really close friends or family) – and we haven’t heard from them for awhile..

“Are you alright mate?”

Don’t knock it…

There is life out there yet…

I said have you seen this mate (after telling him about my long hike with the missus)

Check Out ex GP Dr. Vernon Coleman. He’s got a lovely voice , used to be on Telly, and has written loads of books.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eljyWrbGTlk

Tony

John Pretty
John Pretty
May 27, 2020 9:43 PM
Reply to  tonyopmoc

lol, a sign of the times. We used to put out telephone numbers in phone books, Tony. Yes, I know you remember that.

They hadn’t used to be closely guarded secrets!

Mike Ellwood
Mike Ellwood
May 28, 2020 11:54 PM
Reply to  John Pretty

Ours still was until very recently, and I didn’t ask for it to be taken out, but somehow it was. Probably too much trouble to put it back in. I might do one day if I can find out how easily.

I realised a long time ago that going ex-directory doesn’t protect you against nuisance calls. With modern auto-dialling technology you get calls anyway.

And I’d like people who know me, but may not know or remember exactly where I live or what my number is to be able to find me if they want to. It’s proved useful on many an occasion.

Until relatively recently (well, 1990s) , my Town Council used to produce a Who’s Who of the town, that had everyone listed, based on electoral roll. Surname and Street order. Very useful it was, and was a bit of a local institution, going back decades. There were old copies in the library that were interesting for historical research.

But then things got silly, and they had to stop doing it. You can’t even see the electoral roll at the library any more. Have to go to the District Council now, which in our case is very inconvenient, as it’s out of town in a relatively remote location.

tonyopmoc
tonyopmoc
May 30, 2020 12:00 AM
Reply to  Mike Ellwood

Mike Ellwood,

Yeh, we used to phone each other up too even if we were supposed to be anonymous in 1995, and have completely different views – but like debating…

Are you coming down the pub – we are having a bit of a meeting?

We had never met before, and had no idea, what we looked liked.

So I turned up – with this girl, I had never seen before…kind of met her on the internet (we had been chatting). Her boyfriend checked me out in a pub near Croydon Train Station and we talked machine language – so he gave her nod – he’s probably O.K.

I just came as I was, and said I’m Tony. We didn’t need badges.

Whilst I was never really personally involved, the Computer Games Industry in London in the 1980’s – to the 2010’s was a lot of fun.

She looked a hell of a lot better than Lara Croft..and I walked in with her.

Nice Girl. She was my friend. I was so delighted she came to one of our family/friends music events with her boyfriend a few months later dressed completely normally (stunning)

Everyone was looking. I did tell my wife. My mate thought wtf? How does he know her?

Tony

tonyopmoc
tonyopmoc
May 30, 2020 12:22 AM
Reply to  tonyopmoc

So when he was 15, I managed to get some work experience for him, by asking. For 2 weeks he worked with the bloke who wrote the bloody thing.

Lara Croft underwater – any schoolboy’s fantasy

He was an apprentice.

He worked with Toby Gard for a couple of weeks.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toby_Gard

Tony

John Pretty
John Pretty
May 27, 2020 6:50 PM

I quote:

She suggested to the head nurse that she give mother IV rehydration. The nurse refused, saying it would “just prolong the inevitable.”

I actually don’t agree with the author’s argument here. And this nurse’s comment seems reasonable in the circumstances. People aren’t immortal and sometimes you can prolong the suffering of individuals unnecessarily. I think it must be a tough call sometimes.

I’m put in mind of a family pet. My parents dog was loved by everyone in the family and unique. We never really knew what she was, so she was irreplaceable. Really she should have been put down perhaps a year or two before she actually was. She lived to be 16, but could barely walk at the end. We just didn’t know how to let her go.

This is one of the most frustrating aspects of this whole saga. The majority of those dying are people who are in any event right at the end of their lives anyway. Care home stays, I think I remember reading somewhere, are about 30 months. A good many of these people are incontinent and suffering from dementia. It’s not a very dignified way to live.

People die. I wish this message would get through. And there is nothing you can do about that.

So I don’t agree with the author here – I don’t think that bureaucrats are evil, just selfish and incompetent. Politicians might sometimes be reasonably described as evil, I suppose, but again I don’t think this was a culling exercise.

But with that said, I don’t want to criticise the author too strongly. Any narrative that seeks to criticise government and bureaucracy is a good thing, especially in these times.

ARobert
ARobert
May 27, 2020 10:46 PM
Reply to  John Pretty

How dare you compare her mother to a dog? You ought to be ashamed of yourself!

Norman Pilon
Norman Pilon
May 27, 2020 11:44 PM
Reply to  ARobert

Did he compare her mother to a dog? If he did, I missed it entirely.

He did, however, allude to the difficulty that people have in parting with animals they love — yes, actually love — even when they know that the time for the right and humane thing to do with respect to an animal’s obvious suffering is long past due. How much more difficult, then, must that be in respect of a human being in a similar predicament?

Thus your remark says less to me about John than about an element of rank insensitivity in your own attitude toward people and their relationships with other sentient beings, not to mention your boneheaded and willful mischaracterization of what John is actually saying.

Mishko
Mishko
May 30, 2020 10:45 PM
Reply to  ARobert

That is a pretty good “how dare you”! Keep it up and you will eventually be THE Robert.

Russ
Russ
May 28, 2020 7:25 AM
Reply to  John Pretty

The whole point is that the lockdowns were imposed in the name of protecting the elderly vulnerable. Yet not only did these lockdowns never protect these same vulnerable, but in many cases the opportunity afforded by the fear and confusion is being used to put through euthanasia programs against these same elderly.

So the propaganda theme which implies people are immortal unless killed by Covid-19 (I agree that this is the unspoken theme) goes hand in hand with practice which has nothing to do with public health, in many ways is adding more harm and death, and least of all has anything to do with protecting the vulnerable.

Norman Pilon
Norman Pilon
May 28, 2020 3:56 PM
Reply to  Russ

“Yes” to to everything you assert in terms of a) the propaganda operation legitimizing the lockdowns and b) that the lockdowns are doing nothing to protect those most vulnerable to respiratory diseases and c) that the lockdowns in and of themselves are wrecking lives.

“No” to the idea that “the fear and confusion” being induced by the reality of the lockdowns is “being used to put through euthanasia programs against these same elderly.”

For a) the shocking conditions and practices in nursing homes now being brought to light are actually nothing new but have existed for years and even decades; and b) as for easing the passing of the elderly, that’s has been a longstanding element of standard medical practice: it’s called palliative care.

In the latter respect, what has recently changed is that rather than letting pneumonia take its ‘natural course’ among the elderly, which is typically an ‘easy’ way of dying, some cases are now being referred to critical and intensive care, where aggressive interventions, such as intubation, are being performed, and rather pointlessly for the most part because most elderly patients end up dying regardless, often due to the procedures themselves and not without considerable discomfort for many of those patients, whose experience is sometimes akin to being tortured.

Old people die. Conditions do matter. There is no program of euthanasia.

Russ
Russ
May 29, 2020 6:59 AM
Reply to  Norman Pilon

For a) the shocking conditions and practices in nursing homes now being brought to light are actually nothing new but have existed for years and even decades…

In the latter respect, what has recently changed is that rather than letting pneumonia take its ‘natural course’ among the elderly…considerable discomfort for many of those patients, whose experience is sometimes akin to being tortured.

Those are among the reasons we can be sure the system wouldn’t blanch at de jure euthanasia. While in itself that doesn’t prove it, it does prove that this system is morally capable of any crime.

b) as for easing the passing of the elderly, that’s has been a longstanding element of standard medical practice: it’s called palliative care.

Yet as the piece describes, evidently there are cases where the patient is not in fact about to die and can be helped with such a simple remedy as rehydration, but many of the cadres of the health system understand that their mandate is to hasten “turnover” and log as many C19 deaths as possible.

Norman Pilon
Norman Pilon
May 29, 2020 9:32 AM
Reply to  Russ

this system is morally capable of any crime

The system is certainly not designed to maximize the welfare of people, and especially not that of the elderly, but rather to maximize profits for the ruling class. In that sense, it is in fact capable of any crime and does indeed result in untold misery for a great many people. The system itself needs to be euthanized.

And yes, palliative care is biased toward letting people die who are on the cusp of dying but who could be kept alive a little while longer.

There is no question that many lives could be extended beyond the point where death results on account of choosing to do as little as possible beyond keeping the patient as comfortable as possible.

But this isn’t necessarily in the interest of the patient, whose end-of-life agonies are only being prolonged.

One must unfortunately choose between ‘life at all cost,’ even at the cost of inflicting needless pain, as in the case of intubating an elderly patients because s/he’s now been diagnosed as having COVID-19, or accelerating a process that is not only inevitable but ultimately terminates in a person’s release from the agonies of dying.

In my opinion, ethically speaking, medical protocol should indeed lean in the direction of minimizing suffering in situations where death is imminent, including forsaking known interventions that can only forestall the inevitable but by a few days (or even weeks) but without bringing any additional and substantive comfort to the patient.

Cheezilla
Cheezilla
May 29, 2020 9:59 AM
Reply to  Norman Pilon

Don’t forget palliative care was refused for these people. That, in my view, was the most barbaric.

Norman Pilon
Norman Pilon
May 29, 2020 4:44 PM
Reply to  Cheezilla

I’m quite certain that the palliative care that should be provided as a matter of course to many of the elderly in so-called nursing homes — because of an insufficiency or misallocation of resources, again in the name of profit (or austerity or COVID-19 emergency protocols) — is not being provided. It’s not that frontline workers are not doing there utmost to provide it, it’s rather that they have nothing to work with but the woefully limited means at their disposal.

I think that in writing the following, Rosemary Frei is being extremely uncharitable (if not disingenuous) toward care home staff everywhere:

“Your mother’s declining. She’s been having loose bowels and lots of diarrhea. There’s a DNR on her chart. And we’re not sending anyone to the hospital. [Likely because of ‘Condition Set Two,’ below] We’re going to have to put her on palliative care,” Plaxton recalls the head nurse telling her in a cold, uncaring voice.

It is more probable than not that the head nurse had nothing but the best interest of the patient in mind when she spoke plainly to Plaxton, as difficult as it may have been for Plaxton to hear those words. And as it turned out, it seems that the head nurse’s original assessment had indeed been prescient, under the difficult circumstances for everyone involved.

Mishko
Mishko
May 30, 2020 10:51 PM
Reply to  Russ

Quarantaing the healthy, flattening the curve, extending the whatever is next.
Are the vulnerable any less vulnerable? Ofcourse not. Pure nonsense.
How is the one related to the other and justify the endless rigamarole? BS.
Low end BS. Dull inane nonsensical self-referring BS.

bob
bob
May 27, 2020 6:10 PM

Forget about any early ending of the lockdown

During PM being questioned by parliamentary committee this afternoon he was making comments about flying to other countries – said they will assess at next lockdown review 7th June and see how things are at following review on 28th June – the lockdown is here to stay – i’m sure evrybody will be pleased at this ………

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
May 27, 2020 6:34 PM
Reply to  bob

That should take us neatly in to September/October and the next flu season

IANA
IANA
May 27, 2020 8:27 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

I think thats the plan. Lining up a the vaccine with next ‘wave’. Recently told that for 70% of staff where I work this ‘lockdown’ will continue for at least the next 3 months. While we are at home they are imposing social distancing infrastructure at work.

ame
ame
May 27, 2020 9:46 PM
Reply to  bob

14 day lock down 67 days go
localized lock down measures also called hunger games society

Reg
Reg
May 28, 2020 5:18 AM
Reply to  bob

And then Round 2 . . .

Shruti
Shruti
May 27, 2020 5:49 PM
Reply to  Shruti

Oops, posted in the wrong discussion. Apologies.

John Deehan
John Deehan
May 27, 2020 5:41 PM

The elites coined the phrase at the Club of Rome meeting “ useless eaters”. The majority of the population are who the target is and their plans have been in progression for a very long time. Anyone who has read the books of Professors Antony C Sutton, Carol Quigley, Guido Preparata and been following the James Corbettt series on who is Bill Gates will not be surprised by what the true agenda is concerning the “ pandemic “ Covid-19!

Richard Le Sarc
Richard Le Sarc
May 27, 2020 11:41 PM
Reply to  John Deehan

No they didn’t-where did you get that shite? The Club of Rome warmed of resource depletion and a pollution crisis, forty years on from the 70s, and they were correct.

John Deehan
John Deehan
May 28, 2020 8:08 AM

If you read thirdworldtraveller , they mention the term ” useless eaters ” reportedly used at the Club of Rome. Now, are there any other points I have mentioned in my original post you disagree with.

RahwaTG
RahwaTG
May 27, 2020 4:01 PM

They’re working on several things at the same time. As well as on several different levels.

1) Depopulation
2) Digitalisation
3) Globalisation
4) Oppression

Though there may be other issues and levels present here in the fine print which are invisible to me.

Westerners are now in shock because although you have always been aware that the system kills ot has never bothered you as long as it didn’t kill you. But now you realise that the system kills and that it’ll kill even you. Eventually it’ll kill itself.

My most sincere condolences. But there is a way out. #Reject5G

Reg
Reg
May 27, 2020 4:06 PM
Reply to  RahwaTG

Yep, the war was always going to come home. The citizens are the enemy now. They are disease spreaders and they object to a lot of things so they will have to be dealt with. The Predator drones will be flying over our cities soon. I’m being completely serious.

RahwaTG
RahwaTG
May 27, 2020 4:24 PM
Reply to  Reg

Hi Reg

Predator drones don’t phase me. Neither do tear gas, clones, AI or billionaires. I’m black, Reg, I’m used to it. Eritrea just reversed illegal US sanctions and a twenty year proxy occupation of our territories in Badme. Sure all sorts of other shit happened but then again shit always does.

Don’t be afraid, Reg. Drones? One can throw stones at drones. One can even throw stones at thrones.

I REPEAT – the citizens carry no diseases. Jack Ma’s test kits were intentionally contaminated inorder to confuse the citizens. I repeat – the citizens bear no diseases named Covid-19! Please go out get some sun and tell your neighbours what I just told you! ♡

bob
bob
May 27, 2020 3:51 PM

Isn’t it obvious that elite powers at at war with the populations of the planet?

Nevermind, have another cuppa and enjoy lockup

RahwaTG
RahwaTG
May 27, 2020 4:28 PM
Reply to  bob

Bob, mind control plays a great part in oppressing us. Yes, take it easy. ‘N ‘avva cuppa tea.

Resisting them is only half of the fun.

DomesticExtremi
DomesticExtremi
May 27, 2020 3:05 PM

Administrative euthanasia.

Cheezilla
Cheezilla
May 27, 2020 2:51 PM

The document also listed several symptoms that are “atypical” but “should be considered, particularly in people over 65” [italics added]: unexplained fatigue/malaise, acutely altered mental status and inattention (i.e., delirium), falls, acute functional decline, worsening of chronic conditions, digestive symptoms (e.g., nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain), chills, headaches, croup, unexplained tachycardia, decreased blood pressure, unexplained hypoxia (even if mild) and lethargy.

I’m not medically qualified, but it struck me that most of these symptoms would be caused by dehydration, which is a common problem for people in care homes. This list occurs early in the article. Of course by the time I’d read the whole thing, it was obvious this has been deliberate and systematic.
Worse, it’s happened across the world, which leads to the big questions: Why? (the answer is obvious but psychopathic) and Who‘s orchestrated this?

RahwaTG
RahwaTG
May 27, 2020 2:23 PM

To date, in my country there has not been even one Covid-19-related death. Please OffGuardian could you do a special feature on Eritrea, her rejection of Jack Ma’s contaminated test kits and the absence of 5G radiation there?

Covid-19 death = Jack Ma’s defective test kits + 5G rollouts + deadly antimalarial drugs + vaccines like Hydrochloroquin???????,

Despite Tedros Adhanom’s recent announcement that antimalarial medicines INCREASE THE DEATH RATE of Covid-19-related cases, Djiboutians (for one tragic example) are being prescribed Chloroquine.

Maxwell
Maxwell
May 27, 2020 2:12 PM

With 11 states refusing to report their stats on nursing homes deaths here in the US it is not cited that 43% of all “Covid deaths” come from 0.6% of the population- those who were in long term care facilities.

The Most Important COVID-19 Statistic: 43% Of U.S. Deaths Are From 0.6% Of The Population

Americans are vigorously debating the merits of continuing to lock down the U.S. economy to prevent the spread of COVID-19. A single statistic may hold the key to resolving this debate: the astounding share of deaths occurring in nursing homes and assisted living facilities.

Nursing homes and assisted living facilities: The #1 COVID problem

2.1 million Americans, representing 0.62% of the U.S. population, reside in nursing homes and assisted living facilities. (Nursing homes are residences for seniors needing help with activities of daily living, such as taking a shower or getting dressed, who also require 24/7 medical supervision; assisted living facilities are designed for seniors who need help with activities of daily living, but don’t require full-time on-site medical supervision.)

According to an analysis that Gregg Girvan and I conducted for the Foundation for Research on Equal Opportunity, as of May 22, in the 39 states that currently report such figures, an astounding 43% of all COVID-19 deaths have taken place in nursing homes and assisted living facilities.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/theapothecary/2020/05/26/nursing-homes-assisted-living-facilities-0-6-of-the-u-s-population-43-of-u-s-covid-19-deaths/?fbclid=IwAR2IjM3cJMXrR-7YWKbmwNyJpmtQYuZ2dwFo3fE3dD9NspwZQOdSI1yXIVU#89ebfd174cdb

Maxwell
Maxwell
May 27, 2020 2:12 PM
Reply to  Maxwell

Edit: …it is now cited…

Gary Weglarz
Gary Weglarz
May 27, 2020 2:44 PM
Reply to  Maxwell

Thanks for sharing that.

Shruti
Shruti
May 27, 2020 5:12 PM
Reply to  Maxwell

Finally, some lucidity in MSM, but always after the fact. I disagree with the “Americans are vigorously debating…” statement. I have not seen much debate, just jeering and political alliance.

Ted
Ted
May 27, 2020 7:51 PM
Reply to  Maxwell

Great article. The authors, ever so tentatively point out at the end, that the population wide vulnerability to dying from this illness is way lower than the current estimates, because all the models assume that deaths are either evenly distributed in the population, or rather distributed by age. But, actually it is age, government policy, and residence at a care facility that make this illness particularly lethal. The contrast say between Florida and New Jersey could not be more clear in this regard.

As far as I can tell, this realization is now starting to sink in … this illness is not deadly, but the toxic combination of insane government policy and MSM fear porn generated panic is.

One final thought, in addition to the killing of so many seniors, how many others have been killed by other causes of death as a result of lockdown and fear porn? When Gavin Newsom jumped the gun to be the first to declare lockdown in the US, a friend told me that not obeying the dictates of Dear Gavin was “murderous.” How ironic to discover just who the murderers are turning out to be.

Maxwell
Maxwell
May 28, 2020 1:43 AM
Reply to  Ted

I’m wondering what strategies we can employ to highlight much of what you say- I am finding the conversations I have daily to have shifted immensely in just the last week.

I do know once things “open up” where I live I plan to attend every possible forum out there to “educate” the local politicians- I’m already sending them two write-ups per week that I do on certain aspects of the Covid mythology- have yet to receive a response. Can’t wait for the in-person meetings to get going again.

I want to know how in the f*ck everything isn’t opening up immediately given it is obvious to all but the blind that this “global pandemic” is a dud.

Seems there have to be hundreds or thousands of lawsuits coming up based on the institutional euthanasia, destruction of businesses, mental damages etc…

Ted
Ted
May 28, 2020 2:12 AM
Reply to  Maxwell

I think the political fight here is between a politics of predictive “modelers” (aka soothsayers), and empiricists who pay close attention to what is and has happened, and use both patterns in the past and the present to guide decision making. I don’t get the impression that modelers really care about empirical data, but rely on a set of stock cultural narratives and dodgy assumptions to predict a doom scenario and then, using computer games as “evidence”, get political actors to institute policy to force changes in behavior so doomsday does not come (yes I know, it is a dressed up version of Christian apocalypse eschatology … but there you go). So, what is needed is a political coalition of people who value living in the here and now, and insist on actually using empirical data to make decisions, not computer games. We need to expose the computer gamers as flim flam people who should be run out of every town. Unless we discredit these folks as charlatans and not “scientists” we will never regain reason as a guide to politics.

Thom
Thom
May 27, 2020 1:53 PM

This is a tragic situation. Sadly, I think we all know that ‘compassion’ in politicians and even basic humanity goes out of the window as soon as their own interests are challenged. Look at the numbers of innocent people killed and maimed in the Middle East as a result of the decisions of our ‘civilised’ leaders.
The mistake they’re making this time, however, is that people’s vulnerable and elderly relatives will never be dismissed as collateral damage or a ‘price worth paying’. The politicians and officials responsible for this genocide will be lucky to escape the country by helicopter when the anger reachers a critical mass.

DomesticExtremi
DomesticExtremi
May 27, 2020 3:07 PM
Reply to  Thom

More than tragic – it is state sanctioned murder.

DomesticExtremi
DomesticExtremi
May 27, 2020 3:09 PM
Reply to  Thom

See “Caring Corrupted – The Killing Nurses of The Third Reich” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rz8ge4aw8Ws

Norman Pilon
Norman Pilon
May 27, 2020 1:04 PM

It’s not anything that was planned.

Every year there is a pandemic: it’s called the flu season.

During the flu season, the old and immunodeficient are always those most at risk of serious respiratory complications.

Of course, under a for-profit system, the old and vulnerable tend to be neglected, institutionalized as they are in places where the ‘care’ is less than adequate, and especially so where the ‘care’ happens to be turning a profit for someone.

This year, some doctors in China thought they were observing a novel cluster of respiratory symptoms, and somebody looked and found what appeared to be fragments of RNA presenting a unique genomic sequence — one never observed before — and everyone jumped to the conclusion that we had a new and deadly and highly contagious virus on our hands. The alarm was raised and everyone literally lost their minds.

There is no deliberate culling of the old going on although the placing of profits over people — which is the essence of capital from the standpoint of those being fleeced and abused — has exactly that effect.

As I was recently reminded by John Hardie, in the circumstances, Nietzche’s view on insanity is rather apposite:

“In individuals, insanity is rare: but in groups, parties, nations and epochs, it is the rule.”

Steve Hayes
Steve Hayes
May 27, 2020 1:11 PM
Reply to  Norman Pilon

The quoting of Nietzsche saying that insanity in individuals is rare but normal in collectives is ironic given that he was insane.

Norman Pilon
Norman Pilon
May 27, 2020 1:39 PM
Reply to  Steve Hayes

Indeed!

Karl Nitsch
Karl Nitsch
May 27, 2020 3:24 PM
Reply to  Steve Hayes

And you feel qualified to make a statement about someone’s sanity? I confess that I know very little about the man or his writings.

George Mc
George Mc
May 27, 2020 3:51 PM
Reply to  Karl Nitsch

To be fair, Nietzsche WENT insane for the last 10 years of his life. Of course, it would be easy (and perhaps irresistible) to claim that he was ALWAYS insane or that insanity was the inevitable outcome of his views – this being tempting for e.g. Christians, Nietzsche begin infamously atheistic. Perhaps also tempting for socialists since he was also infamously in favour of “the strong individual” over “the herd”.

The story goes like this: after relentlessly preaching a philosophy that denied the value of compassion, Nietzsche was out walking and saw a man beat a horse. Nietzsche burst into tears and threw his arms round the horse. After which, he was never the same. Draw your own conclusions.

Who D. Who
Who D. Who
May 28, 2020 10:08 PM
Reply to  George Mc

Nietzsche had syphilis. That’s why he went insane. The story about the horse, however, is indeed true.

Mike Ellwood
Mike Ellwood
May 29, 2020 12:03 AM
Reply to  Who D. Who

I guessed he might have. And was therefore probably treated with mercury. Which is a neurotoxin. Which might have made him mad.

Similar story with Van Gogh.

Oh yes; they put mercury in at least some vaccines. As well as aluminium / aluminum. Another neurotoxin.

George Mc
George Mc
May 29, 2020 7:30 AM
Reply to  Mike Ellwood

How long before they claim that mercury will cure coronavirus?

Gezzah Potts
Gezzah Potts
May 30, 2020 1:59 PM
Reply to  George Mc

Finally! Was going thru several articles trying to find a comment from you.
Something odd struck me today.
When the Socialist Equality Party (WSWS) staged their protests in defence of Julian Assange, at the three I went too, there were hardly any police present, maybe 8 or 9.
Today in Melbourne, at the peaceful protest against the entire panicdemic agenda, including censorship, stripping of civil liberties, 5G, etc, there would have been at least 100 police there plus 6 police on horses.
Two different protests, but a huge difference in the police presence.
Makes you wonder… why?

George Mc
George Mc
May 31, 2020 6:17 PM
Reply to  Gezzah Potts

Well I know he’s something of a leftist sacred cow, but I’ve long had my suspicions about Assange. And I’m starting to have suspicions about the WSWS.

But this just underlines the fact that some protests are “safe”. Because I have been redeployed in my work, I am now glancing TV stuff I was previously blissfully unaware of. “Britain’s Got Talent” for example. So this kinda ballet thing came on to raise awareness of plastic pollution in the ocean while the judges nodded sagely and spoke about how powerful and profound it was and how it reminded us we must all “do something about it”. “Like what?” I wondered. Oh yes – watch little Greta do another sermon.

Gezzah Potts
Gezzah Potts
May 31, 2020 11:08 PM
Reply to  George Mc

The huge amount of police, even on horseback, at the anti lockdown protests, which were completely peaceful, compared to the very small number at a supposed revolutionary socialist organisations rally for Assange. It was such a contrast George. And it got me wondering.
Sorry to hear you’re being inflicted with the dirge of TV.
Everything is smoke and mirrors. You can save the Planet by joining one of these ‘Clicktivist’ groups and clicking on your mouse!
Or listen to more Greta sermonising. Or Lady Gaga. Or Bono.

George Mc
George Mc
Jun 1, 2020 9:33 AM
Reply to  Gezzah Potts

When I was a student back in the 80s, I went on a protest and the mounted police were all over the place. At one point I ended up looking up the nostril of one of those beasts (the horse not the policemen) and I was overawed at the size of it. And that was saying a very clear message to me: “We’re here and we’re watching, and we know exactly how to deal with you!” The air of menace was palpable.

Oh, my enforced TV watching is quite interesting. The daytime programmes are abysmal, and they make me miss the old test card which was a still photo and some light music for hours on end. In those days, they had the decency to say, “We’ve got fuck all to show you and we’re not going to pretend otherwise!”

But the programmes now are of course quiz shows and fashion stuff etc. There’s one that centres on dating and I noticed that not only are none of the contestants old but there aren’t even any old people in the shopping precincts they go to. Somebody must clear the old duffers out beforehand and not allow them back till it’s over.

Yes, there must be an appearance of activism because that’s the latest consumerist hook (which is all everything comes down to for the MSM). But it achieves two things at once – it sells stuff and it keeps the population quiescent. Perhaps with the enforced passivity and the lack of any job to focus on, people will really start to think about things. You’ve got to look on the bright side.

Gezzah Potts
Gezzah Potts
Jun 1, 2020 10:07 AM
Reply to  George Mc

Right now, watching Arbroath play on Boxing Day would probably be warmer than the inside of my cabin!
Do they still have Crossroads and Emmerdale Farm on? Or endless repeats of Last Of The Summer Wine?
Nearly all those ‘reality’ TV shows, note both the age, and their looks. I noticed the reaction to Susan Boyle when she came out on stage for her first audition.
It’s all about youth and beauty.
Ironic you mention the ‘appearance of activism’. Was just telling someone about ‘activist groups’ like Avaaz, 350 dot org, and MoveOn, and how they started and how a lot of them were financed by Foundations like Rockefeller and Ford. Oh, and Soros.
I think more people are waking up, and the large protests at the weekend in Aussie were really positive. But we’re still in the small minority. Enjoy your day watching th’ telly.

Steve Hayes
Steve Hayes
May 27, 2020 3:59 PM
Reply to  Karl Nitsch

It is not that I feel qualified. It is simply a fact of history.

George Mc
George Mc
May 27, 2020 2:28 PM
Reply to  Norman Pilon

I think the individual/group distinction re: insanity is complicated by the tendency of information to become distorted as it passes round (Chinese whispers – how apt!) And it’s always the most outrageous and stupid things that go round quickest. The propagandists have always known this. Thus e.g. how easy it is to confuse statistics. If you say 10,000 people today caught the virus, many would go away thinking that 10,000 just died. Etc. etc.

Norman Pilon
Norman Pilon
May 27, 2020 4:25 PM
Reply to  George Mc

Here is another one for you, and just to underscore how deserted the elderly trapped in for-profit care homes truly are: only minutes ago, on television, it was reported that the heat wave presently hitting Ontario and Quebec — in the wake of the pandemic, of course, because nothing these days can be mentioned without connecting it in some way with the pandemic — represents another imminent threat to seniors in care homes. For two thirds of all care homes in those provinces are without air conditioning!

Again, which demographic in society is most threatened by heatwaves?

So you would think that a business that trades in the ‘care’ for the elderly would naturally have twigged to that particular danger and have long ago taken preemptive measures to somewhat protect their streams of income, you know, like something along the lines of ‘centralized air conditioning.’

And what about government oversight?

But now that the pandemic has trained public attention on the appalling conditions in homes for the elderly, will we learn in the fall that winter represents a similar threat on account of two thirds of all care homes not having centralized heating?

If that happens, I really will begin to believe in “some sort of plan to reduce a significant part of the burden on today’s fiscally strained governments.”

On the other hand, when essential services that should never end up in the hands of entrepreneurs end up in their hands, well, we already know what happens: profit really does tend to kill.

Steve Hayes
Steve Hayes
May 27, 2020 12:34 PM

If the author is correct and the high care home death rates are an intentional outcome, this constitutes crimes on such a scale as to make Aktion T4 appear almost like ordinary crime. The mere thought that it could be deliberate is nauseating.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
May 27, 2020 5:54 PM
Reply to  Steve Hayes

the rich kill! poor people, old people, children.

breweriana
breweriana
May 27, 2020 11:32 AM

Could not finish this article.

It practically moved me to tears.

I have to go to business – get a fresh outlook now.

bob
bob
May 27, 2020 10:19 AM

at least there’s some life out there

https://twitter.com/OFalafel/status/1259938976720474113

“It appears some of you idiots can’t follow a simple instruction so here’s THE NEW AND MUCH CLEARER Government COVID Slogan generator”

George Mc
George Mc
May 27, 2020 10:47 AM
Reply to  bob

I have noticed that even amongst the ones who are going along with the MSM narrative, there is an increasing agitation. The spoofs of those glaring yellow warning signs were inevitable. I predict spoofs of those cutesy COVID rewrites of pop songs next.

Fly By Night
Fly By Night
May 27, 2020 9:53 AM

There is a worldwide aspect to this which transcends the interests of national governments. There are disaster capitalists like Christopher Chandler, who built his wealth on the collapse of the USSR. What bigger economic disaster can there be than the #Covid-19 epidemic?

Chandler claims that he does not set up disasters – just moves in after they have happened. But to quote Mandy Rhys-Davies “Well he would, wouldn’t he?” and wouldn’t the smoking gun be pointing at those who benefit?

Here are a series of facts which put together build an unpleasant picture of the possible motives behind the recent mass ‘accidental’ deaths of older people.

The Telegraph (article now completely behind a paywall) reported that Downing Street sent out two “diktats” to the NHS. The Department of Health was also reported as recommending that elderly patients ‘with covid-19’ be taken direct to care homes from their own homes and not to hospital.

And there was an alarming allegation on Twitter at the time of the ‘epidemic’ that first responders were instructed to take elderly emergencies straight to care homes and not to hospital.

During the first six weeks of UK lockdown there should have been 11,538 cases of stroke, circa 100 cases of heart attack, 57,692 case of lower limb injury and 8,769 cases of broken hips. Total 89,537 hospital emergencies the majority of which would have required an ambulance.

How many of these 89,537 emergencies made it to hospital? Hospital beds were standing empty. Any who did not make it to hospital would not have been medically assessed. A common consequence of untreated broken hip in the elderly is pneumonia. And dying of pneumonia is automatically entered on death certificates as being from covid 19 and a ‘natural death’

Who gains financially from this?

Residents of care homes are often maintained by an annuity on their lives using their property to buy this. It’s a gamble between the elderly person and the insurance company, with the elderly person/their carer betting they will live longer while the insurance company bets they won’t do so before all the equity in their homes is lost to the company.

There are also equity release schemes aimed at healthy older people showing them looking gloriously happy with their hands full of cash. Prior to the covid-19 epidemic there appeared to be a big roll out of targeted equity release advertising,

And do these equity release companies sell on the debt?

I recently came across an advert for a house put on a property website by what appeared to be an equity release company. With the ages of the two elderly people listed, a relatively small up front payment and an annuity payment of a larger sum of money per month. The advert gave the ages of the couple living there and showed their much loved beautifully decorated home with the location and a birds eye view of the premises.

If I am correct and it was an advert by an equity release company to sell on the equity release arrangement, it made this couple a sitting target for morally unscrupulous murders.

And what would stop someone setting up a company and buying any number of these annuities? So that they would have a vested interest in the premature deaths of thousands of people?

Back to the likes of Chris Chandler, Bill Gates, the Hedge Fund Billionaires who funded Boris Johnson’ election campaign and the Russian oligarchs in Johnson’s dodgy dossier.

The shadowy disaster capitalist Christopher Chandler has been more or less running the UK government for his own interests since at least 2016. And probably before that as Matthew Elliott worked for Cameron. Everyone knows the name of SPAD Dominic Cummings, not so many know the name Matthew Elliott. Whilst its not clear if Cummings works for Chandler, both he and Elliott worked on the Brexit campaign and Elliott has also been directly employed by Chandler’s Legatum Institute

Other areas to investigate might be those who fund the WHO for example Bill Gates? Does he have money invested in equity release companies or in insurance businesses? Are there any equity release/insurance companies who fund the WHO?

Is Bill Gates interest in developing a vaccination purely from the financial benefit of making vast sums of money from governments health systems from giving healthy people a (hopefully) useless injection? Or is there more than one string to that bow? There was one alarming report that a version of the vaccine increased the likelihood of respiratory infection amongst older people.

And what of the billionaire hedge funders who finance Boris Johnson? And the mysterious Russian billionaires mentioned in the Russian report? Do any of these have interests in equity release schemes? Or money invested in insurance companies?

One final financial observation – the UK government ran its own version of an equity release scheme a few years ago. Newly retired people were encouraged to invest up to circa £20,000 in enhanced state pension payments. They are gambling that they will live long enough to benefit from these. But is the UK government weighing the dice against those who took that gamble?

And is the UK government safeguarding itself against financial loss, by imprisoning older people by putting them under permanent house arrest? Giving the government time to prepare their compulsory ‘vaccination’ without which older people will be forced to stay under permanent house arrest?

The money saved from early release of equity schemes, savings on NHS treatment, state pension payments and the governments enhanced state pension payments would amount to hundreds of thousands of pounds per older person.

Francis Lee
Francis Lee
May 27, 2020 11:15 AM
Reply to  Fly By Night

It was actually Mandy-Rice Davies. Everyone liked Mandy, she was so outrageous.

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
May 27, 2020 11:43 AM
Reply to  Fly By Night

Catherine Austin Fitts and Joseph Farrell have discussed the activity of realtors during the Covid event – linking deaths to the emptying out of rent-controlled properties and gentrification of black districts – given the over-representation of elderly black people among Covid victims in NYC.

Maxwell
Maxwell
May 28, 2020 2:20 AM
Reply to  Moneycircus

Do you have a link to that.

Mikeb
Mikeb
May 27, 2020 9:16 AM

They use the term useless eaters for people past being useful to them i.e. providing tax money to receiving money from either benefits or pension etc..
Funny though, never seems to apply to the likes of gates or soros or any useless to the world politician.
Look at how much money they’ve saved in pensions and medical costs alone so far, must be at least half a billion a year, if not more just in the u.k. alone.
When people started to wake up or become “unsettled” in the past, a good war got rid of most of the battle ready and “talkative plebs” AND got them booty in the process.
Nowadays whos foolish enough to believe their tripe? Not many.
Who’d actually go for conscription now? Off the estates? Nope not happening.
Cant get rid of too many young now as whos going to get them their needed tax money to spend on vanity projects etc…
Get rid of the useless old instead, past their usefulness, no longer needed.
Wait for the next wave, only affects people on the dole…..

ame
ame
May 27, 2020 12:23 PM
Reply to  Mikeb

furloughed is the new dole.
they been killing the disabled poor and venerable for years under the austerity measures

Haltonbrat
Haltonbrat
May 27, 2020 8:59 PM
Reply to  Mikeb

Doesn’t apply to all those royal family parasites.

Edwige
Edwige
May 27, 2020 8:49 AM

The elderly are likely be the main consumers of TV news which explains the incessant fear porn that media has been pumping out.

I can say from my own experience with a parent in a nursing home that staff were always trying to turn the TV on, even when it had been made clear it was unwanted. It seemed like a conditioned reflex on their part.

Blubber
Blubber
May 27, 2020 7:53 AM

Has anyone seen a similar study of the UK situation ie spelling out Gov guidance and health professionals recommendations given across the board relating to treatment of elderly in care homes, hospital, death register and funerals etc. during this pandemic? Although it seems to have been a pensioners pandemic in reality.

jay
jay
May 27, 2020 9:12 AM
Reply to  Blubber

A cull more like…

JudyJ
JudyJ
May 27, 2020 9:44 AM
Reply to  Blubber

Blubber

This document is the official advice to care homes re Covid19. As you will see it confirms that doctors do not visit any homes in person during the pandemic. Similar to the Canadian experience, care homes are advised to regard any sign of deterioration in a resident as a potential indicator of Covid19. They then phone or video-call a GP to discuss next steps. It goes without saying that they are going to react as if it is definitively a Covid19 case. This entails isolating the patient in the care home, PPE etc, and assessing the patient against a National Institute for Clinical Excellence frailty chart. If the resident is arbitrarily considered ‘frail’ they are placed on end of life (palliative) care in the care home. No doctor will have been to assess them when in fact they might just have a cold, or flu or a common urinary tract infection, all of which are treatable.

https://www.bgs.org.uk/resources/covid-19-managing-the-covid-19-pandemic-in-care-homes

bob
bob
May 27, 2020 7:34 AM

This is getting boring now – we are still in lockdown until at least mid-june – when only minor changes appear to be happening with social distancing firmly in place – have you seen the new criteria – this is criminal and more effort should be being used to get out of this mess – rather than going over the same stuff all the time – this is as much fear porn now as the bloody mainmedia – it’s fucking hot outside

the evidence suggests no pandemic so why are we still behaving like we are FREE – when we are not – sure, investigate but who’s going to set that up – the regime??? The people have NO VOICE – that is what should change – because the regime are happy to continue our imprisonment and the criminal deeds ensuing from it – the lies are known about – Let’s get a life shall we instead of this constant navel gazing – almost as bad as the labour party!”!

bob
bob
May 27, 2020 8:15 AM
Reply to  bob

Simon Dolan
@simondolan
Retail can open. In 3 weeks, If they:

1 Limit the number of customers
2 Make sure they are 2m apart
3 Don’t let them touch any goods
4 Make sure people shop alone
5 Put on additional parking
6 Wear masks
7 Make customers wash their hands

Easy.

UK Prime Minister
@10DowningStreet
· 22h
Prime Minister @BorisJohnson sets out how retail can reopen in June.

https://gov.uk/government/news/prime-minister-sets-out-timeline-for-retail-to-reopen-in-june.
195.6K views
0:27 / 1:20
11:05 AM · May 26, 2020·Twitter Web App

JudyJ
JudyJ
May 27, 2020 9:48 AM
Reply to  bob

Courtesy of Boris Johnson, the man who has probably never had to go shopping in his whole life.

Mike Ellwood
Mike Ellwood
May 27, 2020 12:21 PM
Reply to  JudyJ

Surely he must have shopped for flowers and chocolates on the way home, to try to get round his (now ex-) wife, in order to try to mollify her after one of his latest indiscretions? “Sorry darling, it won’t happen again [thinks: until the next time]”.

JudyJ
JudyJ
May 27, 2020 1:15 PM
Reply to  Mike Ellwood

True, Mike. I hadn’t thought of that. But presumably social distancing is less of an imposition in petrol stations. 😀 Whilst on the subject, I once lived near a young lady who had a lovely free life of leisure in a pretty country cottage (which he had bought for her use) in Devon at the expense of an older wealthy married man who led a secret double life – she knew he was married and had a child and they lived as a family in Berkshire. I recall one Christmas, not surprisingly in view of the charade he was caught up in, he hadn’t had time to buy her all the expensive items she had itemised for him and by way of apology when he showed up he brought her a few “cheap” (her word) presents and a nice bunch of flowers. She told me quite proudly that she had thrown the flowers in the bin in front of him and told him she was insulted that he had given her “flowers obviously bought at a petrol station”. As someone myself who put up with never receiving any presents or cards on any occasion from my, then, partner in 35 years (his contention was that spending money on frivolities was for mugs, truth is he simply hated spending money), I told her she should have been grateful! Her relationship with him ended soon after.

ps. that’s what I like about OffG – it provides unexpected opportunities for free psychotherapy sessions! 😉

Mike Ellwood
Mike Ellwood
May 28, 2020 1:50 PM
Reply to  JudyJ

That’ll be 50 guineas please! 😉

Zen Priest
Zen Priest
May 28, 2020 4:21 PM
Reply to  JudyJ

She wasn’t satisfied with the free home then!

Gezzah Potts
Gezzah Potts
May 27, 2020 9:21 AM
Reply to  bob

I strongly suggest you don’t read the Manchester Evening News of May 27th and a report on Govt plans for future local lockdowns when ‘flare ups’ occur in a specific area.
I just read it then, it was posted on FB.
I also won’t mention the Test, Track & Trace system they have planned as well.
In fact, I suggest just avoid all MSM fullstop. It will be good for your blood pressure and mental health!

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
May 27, 2020 7:24 AM

It is programming society to accept the killing of elders. After all, elders have historically been the source of wisdom and that’s competition. But since the feminizing of men continues unabated… who is going to do the killing?

By an overwhelming majority humans reject ALL killing, including in war – where no more than a quarter of soldiers fire their weapons in contact with the enemy (S.L.A. “Slam” Marshall, 1947)

“The American, he concluded, comes ‘from a civilization in which aggression, connected with the taking of life, is prohibited and unacceptable….The fear of aggression has been expressed to him so strongly and absorbed by him so deeply and pervadingly — practically with his mother’s milk.”

But the would-be leaders of the state want to kill, need to kill, so how to ingrain murder in society?

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
May 27, 2020 7:35 AM
Reply to  Moneycircus

The answer is a Huxley-esque Soma trip to the other side, administered by bureaucrats talking in hushed tones with quiet confidence that they are right, backed by the might of the state.

Since men don’t want to fight and war can be continued by modern technological means, the burden of murder has to be shifted to another branch of the state.

Too many young men leads to instability. The historical solution was to send them off to war. By this metric China should already have gone to war as a result of its male baby surplus resulting from the one child policy. This hasn’t happened. The problem is going to be solved by other means.

China has been a Rockefeller project since the 1910s https://book.douban.com/annotation/34355932/ and thus a laboratory to test its plans for the west.

So stop looking at China as “us and them”. You’ve been fooled. Strip off the binary spectacles and throw them away. Look very closely at China. That is your future.

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
May 27, 2020 7:41 AM
Reply to  Moneycircus

Oh, and why the feminizing of men? From what I’ve written so far, it seems fairly clear: Since they’re not going to be sent off to war, it is important not to have all that testosterone protesting at home. How to get rid of rebellious youth?

The flow of oestrogen into the water supply (mostly from farming) showed what could be achieved. The food, education and manufacturing industries did the rest. https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn7440-gender-bending-chemicals-found-to-feminise-boys/

Richard Le Sarc
Richard Le Sarc
May 27, 2020 9:17 AM
Reply to  Moneycircus

Very, very, very deep racist contempt to imagine that a 5000 year civilization is a pawn of Western ubermenschen.

Admin1
Admin
Admin1
May 27, 2020 9:53 AM

They have an elite. The elite co-operates with the other elites around the globe. All the elites exploit and manipulate the 99%. It seems incredibly naive and romantic to imagine it’s all somehow different in ‘other’, non-Western places.

Richard Le Sarc
Richard Le Sarc
May 27, 2020 11:55 PM
Reply to  Admin1

Utter racist, Sinophobic, Orientalist RUBBISH. The Chinese Governments work to increase the standard of living of all their people, and end poverty, and have succeeded magnificently. Chinese wages have grown steadily for decades while Western, particularly Anglosphere, wages have stagnated and inequality grown hugely. Chinese consumption, foreign travel, enjoyment of culture and arts have all grown strongly, for decades. China has also constructed the greatest networks of infrastructure ever created and huge increases in science, technology and culture. You have NO idea about which you are pontificating.

Admin1
Admin
Admin1
May 28, 2020 1:41 AM

Racism involves claiming a group of people are inferior due to their ethnicity – for example the suggestion all Jews are zionists.

It’s not racist to say the Chinese elites are as corrupt as those in the rest of the world. For one thing it’s a comment on elitism not ethnicity and for another it’s not singling out a racial group for special denigration.

You need to stop this weird new thing you do wherein every single critique of China, however mild and non-racist, is greeted by you with screams of ‘Sinophobia!’

Where did this come from? Are the Chinese government paying you or did you go to Beijing for your holidays and come back with some tourist souvenirs and a passion in your heart?

Either way, try to chill, ok.

And are you saying you don’t believe the Chinese have an elite, or they do but it’s totally free from corruption?

Reg
Reg
May 28, 2020 3:43 AM

This is a rose-tinted view of a monomaniac. Better pray for your collapsed biosphere while all this is going on.

Dan
Dan
Jun 28, 2020 8:46 PM

You sound like a one man Chinese government propaganda PR team.
If you are not already living there, it sounds like you should move there as soon as possible.
The only way the Chinese government has succeeded magnificently is in taking over control of Hong Kong, and spreading their communism.
 

Reg
Reg
May 27, 2020 10:34 AM

You get triggered whenever you see the word “China”. Anyway, you know these quotes but I’ll stick them in here anyway:

“One is impressed immediately by the sense of national harmony…. Whatever the price of the Chinese Revolution it has obviously succeeded… in fostering high morale and community purpose. General social and economic progress is no less impressive….The enormous social advances of China have benefited greatly form the singleness of ideology and purpose…. The social experiment in China under Chairman Mao’s leadership is one of the most important and successful in history.”

David Rockefeller, New York Times, 8-10-1973

“We are on the verge of a global transformation. All we need is the right major crisis, and the nations will accept the New World Order.”

David Rockefeller in 1994

A rose-tinted view of the Rockefellers’ footprint in China:
https://asiafoundation.org/2011/10/12/the-oil-princes-legacy-rockefeller-philanthropy-in-china/

Rockefeller Brothers Fund plan for China:
https://www.rbf.org/programs/china/guidelines

Rockefellers teaching a 5,000-year-old civilisation how to do medicine:
https://rockfound.rockarch.org/china-medical-board

So, yeah, these Western ubermenschen have been poking around in China for a long time. Maybe they’re in it for altruistic reasons. However, it’s not “very, very, very” racist to say the Chinese form of societal harmony looks very, very, very appealing to the authorities in the West. So, as Moneycircus says, strap on your seatbelt, dear chap. That’s where you’re going.

Richard Le Sarc
Richard Le Sarc
May 28, 2020 12:01 AM
Reply to  Reg

I wish. Chinese Civilization has always been about ‘harmony’, and the West is concerned with ‘dominance’. So ruling elites gain their legitimacy from bringing up ALL their people to higher levels of comfort and amenity, while in the West the elites are set upon keeping the foot on the proles’ necks-literally when required.

Reg
Reg
May 28, 2020 3:35 AM

Falun Dafa feel the boot on their necks, I bet. No doubt you’ll dismiss them as terrorists per the CCP’s guidelines.

Reg
Reg
May 27, 2020 10:59 AM

You get triggered whenever you see the word “China”. That’s why you’re wilfully misrepresenting Moneycircus’s words. You can’t deny that the Rockefellers, Western ubermenschen, have been poking around in China for a long time. Old man David was a great admirer of Mao. Loved the way he imposed top-down control on Chinese society. The Rockefeller foundations have been doing a lot of “philanthropy” in China, even teaching that 5,000-year-old civilisation how to do medicine the modern way. The Chinese idea of societal harmony looks very, very, very appealing to the authorities in the West. So what Moneycircus is driving at is that that model of governance is coming to a country near you. Strap on your seatbelt, for that’s where you’re going.

Reg
Reg
May 27, 2020 3:45 PM
Reply to  Reg

Sorry for laying it on so thick, guys. The first post went AWOL. So I did the second one. Now I see they’re both there thumbing their noses at me.

Richard Le Sarc
Richard Le Sarc
May 28, 2020 12:03 AM
Reply to  Reg

I get ‘triggered’ by ignorant, racist, buffoons, who know NOTHING about China, or anything else much.

Karl Nitsch
Karl Nitsch
May 27, 2020 3:41 PM

With respect, it seems to be deeper than that. Different groups have different agendas. Coalitions are sought, formed, realigned, and dissolved for different reasons.

Richard Le Sarc
Richard Le Sarc
May 27, 2020 9:16 AM
Reply to  Moneycircus

‘The American…a civilization in which aggression…is prohibited and unacceptable…’. I’ve not laughed so long and hard for quite awhile.

BDBinc
BDBinc
May 27, 2020 3:50 AM

No deaths can be attributed as caused from an utterly fabricated disease ” COVID19″ ( a magic new disease said to be exactly the same same as “cold and flu” symptoms which of course no one was tested for).
Unfortunately the compassion-less murderous corporate death memes have been infecting drs, nurses hospitals and rest homes for some time . Its been kept secret in the medical system as the dysfunction in the medical system increased.
Now many elderly in resthomes are drugged, sedated, they worsen then get put into hospital wing and die( usually on unsafe medications).
We see this medical/ social dysfunction in the so called ” suicide Bills” Govts legalizing patient murders.Cost cutting is what the Crown Corporation( and its employees) call it.

There is a disconnect from the heart going on in human beings and the fear generating media and Govts do not help but enforce this type of ” wrong”( reverse /Orwellian) thinking which leads to inhumanity.
The solution to all our problems, problems that stem from lack of love is love , it may sound cheesy but its true we have forgotten who we are.
So not being who we are we are acting as we are told to act, thinking and feeling how we are told which results in ( fear/anger /otherness).
We cannot access our innate inner wisdom in a state of fear or anger.

a name
a name
May 27, 2020 8:55 AM
Reply to  BDBinc

My old job(paramedic) used to require going into many of these “care” homes. Sadly most of these places have people that don’t give a shit running them and people that don’t know shit taking care of the patients. Have been in places that would eagerly use Covid-19 as an excuse to let troublesome patients die. I know this because I have personally witnessed them use much less believable excuses to let troublesome patients die.

There are some wonderful caring people in medicine, but it’s not the norm, they are a minority. Following protocols is what is rewarded even when these protocols have been proven harmful to the patient. Many providers just memorize shit for their re-certification tests and know next to nothing about disease processes nor know the mechanism of action for the medications they are injecting into people.

The guy who trained me once told me that western medicine has nothing to do with making patients better. I thought he was a little nuts at the time. Then after a couple years I saw how right on he was. Getting an inside look at many(not all) current medical practices is a very eye opening and disturbing experience.

JudyJ
JudyJ
May 27, 2020 9:55 AM
Reply to  a name

Thank you for that telling insight. It confirms what many of us suspected, in my case from seeing ‘treatment’ my mother received in a major teaching hospital.

martin
martin
May 28, 2020 2:12 PM
Reply to  JudyJ

Last year here in Australia my wife (61) was referred by her GP to the public hospital and was kept in for observation. I was pleased they did not operate but over the course of a month including a short spell home she got worse. We had private health insurance for a private hospital but were encouraged to support the new public hospital by using BUPA, which seemed a good thing to do. It was busy and modern with lots of different doctors and nurses sweeping thru, a bit concerning that they never had her notes and asked questions as if she was newly admitted. She continued to get worse and I made a fuss mainly about the stressful conditions and asked for a single room or a transfer.

After a while she did get transferred to the private hospital. What I found out after was that she had been on the operating list for some time (they never said) but kept getting bumped off. There was a daily team meeting which decided. The private surgeon who finally rescued her operated immediately but it was now a much more serious operation. She is thankfully now well.

Without that insurance, which I was on the point of cancelling because I was no longer working, I don’t like to think what might have happened. Or what would have happened had it been this year.

I tell this story for any Aussies that might be in this position, and for Brits (as I am) who might wonder what a mixed private / public system looks like. The private hospital surgeon and anesthetist provided a personal service. The public hospital was a committee that did not even seem to have her notes or care how ill she got. I was completely disillusioned. You clearly have to fight for proper care, something that goes very much against the grain with me. Very grateful to have her back.
.

JudyJ
JudyJ
May 28, 2020 7:31 PM
Reply to  martin

martin

Worrying times for you, indeed. Glad everything seems to be on an even keel now.

Both of my late parents were very fit and healthy people prior to their final periods of hospitalisation . During his lifetime my father had only been in hospital once before, in his 30s, for a broken leg. My mother had only ever been in to have three children. On the only occasions they needed emergency professional medical help in hospital both were seriously let down, with my father dying at 76 and my mother left severely debilitated at 89.

I am afraid that I too have little faith in medical services these days, and it’s certainly not just down to lack of resources.

martin
martin
May 29, 2020 4:39 AM
Reply to  JudyJ

Thank you for your reply Judy, I am sorry about your parents. I watched John Pilger’s film on the NHS and it seems that getting shunted into a small sub standard private hospital is also a potential hazard of a mixed system. So it is not so simple as private good, public bad. I suppose where all this is heading is an elite referral path to elite hospital set up with your GP in advance (for those that can afford it). Probably in place now, but just buying private health insurance is not enough, that is intended to become the base level.

Mike Ellwood
Mike Ellwood
May 27, 2020 12:33 PM
Reply to  a name

The guy who trained me once told me that western medicine has nothing to do with making patients better.

It certainly would not benefit the pharmaceutical giants if any of their products actually “cured” anything. Regular “treatment” is the order of the day. And the prescription pad bashers (now made so easy via keystrokes) conspire with them, whether knowingly, or not.

There is an old saying: ” “Nature heals and the doctor collects the fee”. Voltaire (supposedly) said: ““The art of medicine consists of amusing the patient while nature cures the disease.”

This truth was always known, but nowadays, we supposedly have scientific medicine, with an array of supposedly scientific tests, and medicines supposedly proved safe and effective by Randomized Controlled Trials. Frankly, this is just a much more expensive and dangerous form of “amusing the patient”.

Joopy
Joopy
May 27, 2020 3:38 AM

The majority of alleged – and we know the issues with the tests and the misattributed causes of death thanks to liberal and frankly sinister new guidelines – covid deaths here in the states are those in nursing homes and the average age of those dying is around 80 across the board. And it’s not quite clear that they were deliberately culled, whether from the virus that I’m not entirely certain even exists, or from the horrid conditions, increased stress, forced isolation, neglect, etc. And we know that children are not only essentially immune but aren’t the invisible “shredders” or carriers they claimed they were. In my state there’s literally only 4 deaths under 50 last time I checked, and 0 under 18! And we know that everyone who does die has underlying conditions, and that even the vast majority of the older population who gets infected are just fine. And they have the chutzpah to shut down the entire society and economy for over two months now, except for the big box stores and chain restaurants of course.

It’s so insidious the way they manipulated the unwitting masses into buying into the lockdown by fearmongering first about mass death which never came, just like the previous pandemic false alarms over the last several decades, then appealing to our collective spirit by telling us we needed to “stay home” and ” save lives” in order to “flatten the curve” and not overwhelm our hospitals, even though they’ve in fact been emptierr than ever and actually furloughed thousands of workers, and using the normal human compassion for the elderly and vulnerable and children and health workers as weapons against anyone questioning the lockdowns and the seriousness of the threat.

They called us granny killers for just going outside and yet they’re the ones who are committing genocide against the elderly population right now. They cynically used the youth to call us callous and uncaring when they’re the ones who are causing incalculable psychological damage by isolating them from their friends and replacing full days at schools, where many received their only healthy meals and reprieve from bad home lives, with days in front of screen and no escape from their abusers. They created a propaganda blitz turning doctors and nurses into super heroes, only slightly tweaking their strategy from drumming up jingoistic militarism and support for the troops and the wars, and yet they’re the ones creating artificial nursing shortages and causing endemic burnout because they’re stretched between a dozen patients by themselves during long and grueling shifts with shit pay. Now many are furloughed and they’re busy replacing them with telemedicine and ai robots. Thanks for your service, the unemployment office is this way…

It’s so fucking demoralizing and dumbfounding to observe how successfully they’ve accomplished their goal of dividing us amongst ourselves, with one half thinking the other half are all crazy, whether you’re a true believer or a truther, and think the other one is either a selfish, anti science, flat earther conspiracy theorist or a total dupe. This site is of course an echo chamber of skeptics but I’m not even sure we’re the majority running even actually half in the real world. And while we argue over social media the money is flowing from taxpayers to the stock market reinflating the asset bubble with trillions in Fed purchases while food bank lines grow longer and more and more people are breaking from the inhumane conditions they’ve imposed on us, and Gates and Bezos and Bloomberg and Schmidt are salivating over the new normal they have in store for us on the other side of this psy op, which is, as I call it, the techno fascist, neo fedual, digital dictatorship, replete with chips and digital IDs and wallets and AI administered medicine and education with every last aspect of human activity and nature recorded as data in the panopticon, connected by the untested and terrifying 5G infrastructure being rolled out as I type this.

I really worry whether or not enough people will wake up in time, if they’re really capable of comprehending just how fucking evil the ruling class is and how much danger we’re all in right now.

Sam
Sam
May 27, 2020 5:20 AM
Reply to  Joopy

They called us granny killers for just going outside and yet they’re the ones who are committing genocide against the elderly population right now.

They cynically used the youth to call us callous and uncaring when they’re the ones who are causing incalculable psychological damage by isolating them from their friends and replacing full days at schools, where many received their only healthy meals and reprieve from bad home lives, with days in front of screens and no escape from their abusers.

AMEN

Shruti
Shruti
May 27, 2020 5:30 AM
Reply to  Joopy

Very well said.

Richard Le Sarc
Richard Le Sarc
May 27, 2020 9:23 AM
Reply to  Joopy

The ‘advice’ has been mostly wrong, possibly deliberately. Most transmission occurs indoors. Going outdoors is good for the soul, and Vitamin D levels, essential for the immune system. People should have been encouraged to walk, even at the height of the outbreak, as much as possible, but wearing masks and keeping a little distance from others. And once infected, hydroxychloroquine (unless you have an uncommon cardiac condition)azithromycin and zinc, for a short regimen to knock the virus down. Obviously other, and, as in the case of vaccines, highly sinister moves are afoot.

Kalen
Kalen
May 27, 2020 2:09 AM

The horrific Covid guidelines about managed homes for elderly are simply genocidal. Elderly ate being murdered en mass in plain view and that is primary reason for recorder weekly excess deaths.

In fact they have similar principles to those of Nazi death camps when vast majority of prisoners died from starvation (190 kCal per day for work in quarries ) , and camp spread nosocomial diseases like typhus or cholera, conditions effectively created by camp administration guidelines and regulations.

What was also characteristic that not only sick people in the camp blocks were denied basic medical help but in fact almost all those who went to camp’s hospital were experimented with using unapproved tests, protocols and drugs used under exigent circumstances or were killed by doctors as eugenics was a recognized therapy in mainstream medical field worldwide. Medical profession never accounted for their century of embracing of eugenics effectively until 1960s and it shows today.

Like in COVID cases hypocrisy and lies about cause of death in Nazi camps were also shocking as except for few cases of prisoners killing prisoners no one was officially murdered in death camps. Prisoners and that included children were officially dying from communicable or others diseases, work accidents, suicides, killed during escape attempts, executed by verdict of camp’s “court of law” to name few.

Even gas chamber murders were classified USING IBM cart readers as resulted from side effects of special hygienic, anti typhus therapies.(special treatment) A treatment of supposed “hygiene baths” using ZYKLON B produced by A.G. FARBEN subsidiary of BAYER CORPORATION for profit.

Nazis weaponized infectious diseases and entire hygiene against enemies of the state.

Fascism is back.

Calamity Jane
Calamity Jane
May 27, 2020 3:53 AM
Reply to  Kalen

No new deadly disease …its a State lie .
Oh they’ll try to make you pay for a vaccine for what does not even exist.

Richard Le Sarc
Richard Le Sarc
May 27, 2020 9:26 AM
Reply to  Calamity Jane

There is a novel, highly infectious disease, that kills the elderly and infirm, and a scattering of younger victims thanks to a plethora of mechanisms to produce morbidity. It’s no ‘lie’, but it has been beaten up and lied about with gusto by various malefactors, for sinister ends, no doubt. I’ll be vaccinated for this disease only forcibly.

Admin1
Admin
Admin1
May 27, 2020 12:43 PM

It kills a tiny percentage of the infirm. The elderly are at very little increased risk If they are fit.

Most people will never get the virus. Most of those who do will be symptom-free. Most of those with symptoms will have a cold or mild flu. And even people over 80 with co-morbidities who are sick enough to be admitted to hospital have something like an 80% chance of survival.

The virus is just not a big deal. Accept that.

Richard Le Sarc
Richard Le Sarc
May 28, 2020 12:06 AM
Reply to  Admin1

Your attempt to IMPOSE total Groupthink on those who bother to comment here is bizarre. Take it from me-NOT everyone thinks like you. I’m afraid the world is complicated.

Admin1
Admin
Admin1
May 28, 2020 1:21 AM

The numbers of dead and the lethality of the virus are not matters of opinion, they are facts. If you choose to ignore the facts and believe something that isn’t true you have no right to expect your belief to be catered to.

If you think the rough stats I quoted are not accurate feel free to correct them from a cited source.

Reg
Reg
May 28, 2020 7:38 PM

Bit like China, eh?

Reg
Reg
May 27, 2020 3:48 PM

“There is a novel, highly infectious disease . . .”

Sheesh, you live in a cheap Hollywood shlockbuster.

Doctortrinate
Doctortrinate
May 27, 2020 1:34 AM

an intentional creation ?….lets see, what devilry will a small peak into the history of this psychotic filth reveal – how about, the unjustifiable deaths of 40 million +

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2d26IVqVivE

so, created on purpose ?… after a nanoseconds consideration – I think it a definitive yes.

Jonnyrotten
Jonnyrotten
May 27, 2020 12:46 AM

I find it very hard to believe that senior civil servants and ministers didn’t sit around a table and, using typical English polite inference, discuss the maximum number of deaths that could be achieved during this ‘crisis’. It reminds me of the HIV blood contamination crisis, which I’m surprised you didn’t reference. Both France and the UK, engaged in a systematic murder of the sick by knowingly injecting HIV into the veins of haemophiliacs from contaminated blood products from the USA.

So we know they are capable of it, the only question is did they manage to pull it off. From the hear-say it looks like sending contaminated Covid patients, like burning ships, back into the old peoples homes was exactly what it looks like, an attempt at mass murder of the old.

DomesticExtremi
DomesticExtremi
May 27, 2020 3:16 PM
Reply to  Jonnyrotten

Any government that has shut down the economy and out its citizens under mass house arrest has a vested interest in a large body count to justify their actions…

Reg
Reg
May 27, 2020 12:25 AM

Shot dead in a covid-19 incident. Contains this gem: “Democrat Washington governor Jay Inslee, whose daughter-in-law works for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation . . .”

https://www.targetliberty.com/2020/05/gunshot-victims-count-as-coronavirus.html

Jonnyrotten
Jonnyrotten
May 27, 2020 12:52 AM
Reply to  Reg

All governments in the US sphere are over-counting deaths, it has little to do with Gates.

Reg
Reg
May 27, 2020 3:17 AM
Reply to  Jonnyrotten

You’re deliberately refusing to see how they all work together.