US ‘Empire of Debt’ will go to war to stop emergence of petro-yuan

Photo Paul Yeung/Reuters

RT Reports:

The imminent introduction of oil trading in yuan is a very bold move by the Chinese, because the US will not give up the basis of its hegemony – the dollar as the world’s reserve currency – without a fight, Max Keiser, host of RT’s financial program ‘Keiser Report’ has said.
The Chinese plan to roll out a yuan-denominated oil contract before the end of this year is a very brave move, since countries who “tried to exit the oil-dollar matrix have met terrible ends,” Keiser pointed out.
“Saddam Hussein wanted to trade oil in Euros and he was killed, Muammar Gaddafi wanted to trade his energy in something other than the US dollar – he was killed,” Keiser said.
China, however, has the resolve and the resources to pull-off the de-dollarization, and besides, it’s backed by several major countries which are “resistant to America’s financial cartel,” namely Russia and Iran, Keiser said.
“Kudos to China for taking this project on and of course they are rumored to be a big buyer in the Aramco offering of their state oil facilities coming down the pike,” Keiser said, referring to the anticipated sales of shares in the Saudi Aramco state oil company.
“This makes sense, geopolitical sense, in terms you’ve got China and Russia and the Saudis looking to escape the US dollar, US dollar hegemony.”
Saudi Arabia was pushed to the de-dollarization crowd only recently by the US itself, which, last year, allowed survivors and relatives of the victims of the 9/11 attack to sue the kingdom over its alleged role in the terrorist acts, Keiser stated.
“There’s decently motivation for the Saudis. They want to float Aramco, they are deeply in debt and they are running out of cash. And they wanted to do an APO [alternative public offering] of Aramco either on London or American exchange, but they prevented from doing so from the legal actions of the 9/11 survivors, who rightly pointed at Saudis as the cause of 9/11,” Keiser noted.
Countries worldwide are tired of funding the America’s “military adventurism by being a party to the ‘Empire of Debt,’ as it’s known around the world – the US dollar,” and therefore, will likely join the de-dollarization movement, Keiser said.
The US financial sector and its military-industrial complex are unlikely to give up the dollar hegemony without a fight, though, as the dollar is both the basis and the main product of America. And the US will use its other favorite tool for it – war, Keiser believes.
“Maybe they will start a war between Japan and China, and maybe they will start a war with North Korea. America will do anything to keep the US dollar as the world’s reserve currency,” Keiser said.
“They will invade the countries, like Afghanistan, they will stop at nothing. Because this is the basis of the US empire. It’s not land-based, it’s not based on material goods, it’s based on rent-seeking. It’s based on landing dollars, getting out income and when countries can’t pay they dismantle the assets and take them over. We saw it in Latin America, South America, this is how America built its empire.”


 

co-founding editor of OffGuardian (retired)

Filed under: conflict zones, Economics, latest, short videos, video

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co-founding editor of OffGuardian (retired)

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John Watwood
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John Watwood

Yes, but it isn’t just America that is doing this. It is also the UN and it’s IMF and BIS. Both controlled by the ‘ruling elite families’. Those mentioned above whom were killed, weren’t killed just backing away from the dollar, they were killed because they wanted their currency backed by gold, and to de-privatize publiclize natural resources. Gadaffi also wanted to set up an African Union, to unite all those countries and the Western kakistocracy couldn’t have that so…China going to a ‘petro’ juan is just enslaving themselves to those whom control most of the world’s petroleum, the same… Read more »

Christopher Barclay
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Christopher Barclay

If the dollar is to lose its reserve currency status, something has to replace it. Gold? Oil? The latter is particularly unlikely given that it is being consumed and turned into pollution as quickly as it is pumped out of the ground. If the yuan is to challenge the dollar, the control freaks in Beijing will have to let go of it to a certain extent. There is little sign of that happening.

John Watwood
Reader
John Watwood

I believe the next ‘world currency’ will be digital, a blockchain sort of deal with social ‘status’ entwined into it just like China is actually doing. A reward and punishment system, completed digitized and controlled the kakistocracy. The more one puts into the system and is ‘good’, the more one can get. If not, the less. All Countries are actually considered corporations, yet the do not make money, the borrow it becoming bankrupt and insolvent. Ironic there, setting up a governance system that is doomed to fail, to become insolvent to the ‘elite’ few compared to the majority population, is… Read more »

Mikalina
Reader
Mikalina

On line energy ‘coupons – rewarded or removed according to: the work you carry out for the ‘state’; how many ‘chosen’ youtube videos you watch; how many online mental health programmes you undertake; how many ‘likes’ you get on your blog.
(Extra coupons if someone in your family ‘commits suicide’? Especially within a ‘state’ sponsored programme.)

Thomas Peterson
Reader
Thomas Peterson

Why does there need to be a single reserve currency?

John Watwood
Reader
John Watwood

Great question. And there doesn’t. Not for us, but for the kakistocracies there does. Their hierarchy depends on it.

Big B
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Big B

There doesn’t. If it happens: it will be engineered to suit the upper one percent’s centralised control over the banking system. It is the antithesis of that which would suit the people: decentralised local credit mutuals; cooperative banks; lending interest or interest-free local currencies; 100% reserve banking; P2P; LETS schemes; etc. If it ever happens it would be game over for a cooperative socialist future. Which is why I say “shall we cheer and throw flowers for our own funeral”?

BigB
Reader

Absolutely right: though not a popular POV to share hereabouts. The Chinese policy is toward a basket of currencies: analogous to, or identical with the Special Drawing Rights of the IMF. I linked to the PBOC chairman’s essay below. Russia-China want greater influence within the “rules based international order”: and a seat at the top table with a strong yuan within the currency “basket”. They are fully committed to the WTO rules and “global economic governance” (see BRICS declaration linked below). To do that, as you say, they will have to give up rigid control of the yuan; de-peg from… Read more »

Michael McNulty
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Michael McNulty

If the dollar collapses the Chinese will still want to buy it. By the ton, to fuel their power stations.

John Watwood
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John Watwood

lol

Bal S
Reader
Bal S

Dalai Lama = CIA stool pigeon (like Bin Laden, and just as useful for Western revisionists).

George Cornell
Reader
George Cornell

Replies stalled

BigB
Reader

Read this article carefully: it is pure supposition interlacing propagandising commentary. It is crude: but reading the comments …nevertheless incredibly effective. The underlying perception management is that capitalist bloc A (the US Imperium) is bad …well true enough …but the incredibly simplistic inference is that capitalist bloc B (Russia-China) is therefore good. That is pure soft propaganda hopium. If capitalist bloc B “de-dollarises” – i.e. cuts the financing to bloc A – the world will be a tianxia bliss-filled harmonious community under a capitalist ‘heaven’. It really worries me if people actually believe this. Fossil capitalism: irrespective of national origin… Read more »

John Watwood
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John Watwood

Excellently said BigB. It is all theater. The central kakistocracy the UN is orchestrating all of this to complete a centralized world wide control grid/mechanism. 5G and the IoT and blockchain digital currencies will complete the transformation. And, of course, Agenda 21. The less people, the easier the control. Plus, this system ensures that no one can ever get out and away from it, even the self named ‘elites’. H.G. Wells’s Manifesto to the Elites explains this quite explicitly. Yes, the ‘elites’ or higher ranking members of the hierarchy will have the freedom to rape, torture, and murder at will,… Read more »

Seamus Padraig
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Seamus Padraig

Legend to the contrary, China is actually still quite communist: https://www.amazon.com/China-Communist-Dammit-Dawn-Dynasty/dp/6027354380
The notion that China is ‘just as bad as the US’ is a revival of the old Trotskyite line about moral equivalence between the US and USSR. It’s a clever strategy to immobilize the left and weaken its criticisms of the US régime.

Big B
Reader
Big B

BS: the notion the American capital is bellicose and Chinese capital benign is a clever strategy to immobilize the left and weaken its criticisms of capitalism. It is to draw away from a root cause analysis and propose a reverse globalisation alternative. Chinese tianxia rhetoric is clouding our minds: there is no good capital and bad capital – there is only capitalist exploitation and alienation. Chinese capital and American capital don’t separate out: they produce the same net effect. A good example is the part ownership of the eco-terrorist Rio Tinto by Chinalco and Alcoa. Is the part of the… Read more »

Christopher Barclay
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Christopher Barclay

The wealth inequalities, the absence of a welfare state, the number of executions, the femicide, the censorship? Is this the communism you are fighting for?

Stephan Flach
Reader
Stephan Flach

All true but how do you want to break the grip of each bloc’s monopolies in media and education if you don’t allow the systems to actually enter into a ‘free’ competing market that eventually eats itself up, like we can now observe in the borderline hilarious card house of propaganda concerning Russia and China. We’re at the point where a critical mass stopped believing in the emotional narrative the news present to us. Hence their duly crafted soft power is failing. That’s where all these repressive sentiments, forced vaccinations talk, stripped civil rights, terror laws, surveillance laws etc. come… Read more »

George Cornell
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George Cornell

No one believes it, you can be sure. What people believe is in the necessity of balance.

Fair dinkum
Reader
Fair dinkum

The bully has met hi$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ match.

rogerglewis
Reader

http://letthemconfectsweeterlies.blogspot.se/2018/03/time-tides-and-nature-of-things-dollar.html Tides of the Dollar Moon A planet to its Star must look The planet no less needs its moon. As the Sun is the store of energy, New. The moon drives and regulates currents, of the tides , time and the nature of things. That Golden Orb gives all That silvery Moon regulates all Both work together even as the other Seemingly sleeps and yet currents of the tides, Time and the nature of things pass. On the nature of Man made things On a standard of gold which Jennings would not be crucified upon , That cross Of… Read more »

rtj1211
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rtj1211

Every war the US prosecuted since 1946 saw no fighting on the US mainland.
About time that changed. Make 300 million Americans know what being carpet bombed feels like.
Their stomach for a fight will not be there…..

JJA
Reader
JJA

“Their stomach for a fight will not be there…..” Your comment reminds me of the scene in ‘In Bruges’ where the Irish hit man hiding out taunts the grossly fat Americans, knowingly pointing out that they are too obese to chase and catch him. Sure enough the American tries for a couple of steps, then gives up, panting heavily. With supposedly 40% of the American population obese, which, from my occasional observation is on the low side, they are certainly not in any fit state to fight. The east and west coast elites would never put their own bodies on… Read more »

John Watwood
Reader
John Watwood

I concur. As soon as the UN kakistocracy is ready, the US will be invaded and brought to it’s knees.

tarqu1no
Reader

Isn’t that exactly the phrase used by Japan in WWII? Just sayin’

George Cornell
Reader
George Cornell

Maybe that is what it will take to give them the idea that their unemployable unprincipled military might not really be “heroes” after all. The torturers at Abu Ghraib for example.

rogerglewis
Reader

John Watwood
Reader
John Watwood

Nice. Two alternative music stations that I listen to are beginning to play First Aid Kit’s songs.

Mikalina
Reader
Mikalina

Heartbreaking….

George Cornell
Reader
George Cornell

Thanks Roger

kevin morris
Reader

In and amongst all the celebratory and congratulatory comments about the fall of the dollar and the rise of the yuan, please spare a thought to the plight of the Tibetans, second class citizens in their own country thanks to the brutal colonialist policies of the Chinese since 1951.

Richard Wicks
Reader
Richard Wicks

The Tibetans were a bunch of savage primitives before Red China took them over. It was a dictatorship and an extremely common judicial punishment was amputation of an appendage.
Is communism any better? Who cares, it’s not our problem. You want to fight a war, I’ll buy you a gun and fly you there.

Christopher Barclay
Reader
Christopher Barclay

Are there any other ‘savage primitives’ that imperialists are allowed to conquer and exploit and remain socialists?

kevin morris
Reader

The Chinese word for Tibet translates as ‘western treasure house’ and with this in mind, China has been plundering Tibet’s natural resources ever since 1951. It you look closely at areas of Asia that are still Tibetan in culture, such as Ladakh and Bhutan, you find relatively low levels of economic development but people happy with their lot. Look at Lhasa and you find the Tibetans as second class citizens, living in what has become an alien country, denied a secondary education in their own language. How could this be? As for ‘savages’ the Tibetan language was in fact the… Read more »

Seamus Padraig
Reader
Seamus Padraig

“… it is clear to me that the nearest analogue to what the Chinese are doing in Tibet, is in fact the US’s treatment of native Americans.” Exactly. So what standing does the US have to sit in judgment of China? After all, I don’t see Washington making any moves to give the Indians their land back. Do you? And how about Palestine? Is Washington getting ready to cut Israel’s military aid until they enact a serious two-state solution? Oh no! They’re too busy shoveling money and weapons at Tel Aviv– and they’re now talking (once again) about bombing Iran.… Read more »

Mikalina
Reader
Mikalina

For the sake of clarity and history: The term ‘Indians’ is now considered pejorative and isn’t used. The two state ‘solution’ was imposed on the Palestinians by the British (and not agreed to by the Palestinians) and the idea subsequently used as a ‘sap’ to the rest of the world while Israel ignores the 77 UN resolutions against it. Israel is an illegal occupier of Palestinian land and the rightful owners would like their land back. Lobbyists are a conduit for money used to bribe politicians around the world. The money comes from finance/industry/military/media cabal who control governments, again, around… Read more »

John Watwood
Reader
John Watwood

‘Give me control of a Nations currency and the right to print it and I care not who makes the laws’. A. Rothschild.

vexarb
Reader

@Kevin. By simultaneously promising “freedom” to the Buddhists of Tibet and the anti-Buddhist Muslims of Burma, NATZO is going to bring the same peace and prosperity to these countries as it has al ready proven itself able to deliver in Syria, Libya, Kosovo, Georgia and the Ukraina. Inevitable — unless the people of Tibet and Burma look around them, see what has happened to those other countries, and do not swallow NATZO’s poisoned Freedom Cookies.

kevin morris
Reader

Nobody has promised freedom to Tibet and only one country- Ecuador if I remember correctly- supported them at the United Nations in the early fifties when they pleaded for international support in the face of a Chinese invasion. The US briefly funded Tibetan guerillas based in Mustang, Nepal, but withdrew support following Nixon’s meeting with Mao shortly before Mao’s death in 1976. Clearly, the genocide of a weak nation counted very little when weighed against the US gaining an ally against the Soviet Union. As for solving the world’s problems, I leave that to the few people who might actually… Read more »

John Watwood
Reader
John Watwood

I concur. A kakistocracy is a kakistocracy. No matter how named or what ever the play of words is involved with said kakistocracy: democracy, republic, federation, communism, etc. Centralized power is a kakistocracy and is not there for the benefit of the majority. A very primitive mind set methinks is that of governance, hierarchy, and sovereignty.

vexarb
Reader

@kevin. Googled “USA supports Tibet freedom”, got this from Wikipedia: “The CIA’s Secret War in Tibet,[24] reveal how the CIA encouraged Tibetan revolt against China — and eventually came to control its fledgling resistance movement. The New York Times reported on October 2, 1998 that the Tibetan exile movement received $1.7 million a year in the 1960s from the CIA. The Dalai Lama said in his autobiography that his brothers were responsible and that they didn’t tell him about it, knowing what his reaction would be. Lodi Gyari, the Dalai Lama’s personal representative in Washington, said he had no knowledge… Read more »

kevin morris
Reader

Increasingly, ‘The Way’, as you call it, doesn’t seem to offer answers to issues faced by Tibetans forced to live in a country no longer their own. I’m sure you are aware that young Tibetans, especially those living in former regions of Tibet no longer even regarded as Tibetan, such as Amdo and Kham see their only way of stating their own independence is dowsing themselves in petrol and setting themselves alight. Many of the CIA funded guerrillas guerrillas killed themselves in despair after the US ditched them at the request of Mao. Their abandonment by the US makes clear… Read more »

George Cornell
Reader
George Cornell

They could hardly be worse than the US. As for Tibet, formerly part of China, they serve to highlight the fact that China does not invade other countries and steal their stuff and their territories, and really has never done so. And don’t come back about the Uighurs, the Vietnamese and India until you have read carefully.
So you would prefer the Americans with their 800 bases in 150 countries, raping children in Okinawa, ……well you’ve got it. Who are you? David Frum?

kevin morris
Reader

Arguments about Tibet being part of China are complicated, but also fraught with deliberate obfuscation on the part of China. In 1904, Britain had no doubt who ruled Tibet when they invaded the country and forced a trade treaty on Tibet. Interestingly, and in passing, Colonel Younghusband who led the campaign was so effected by Tibet that on retirement he devoted the rest of his life to campaigning for world peace. In fact, Tibet had been a warrior nation and around 1000 AD, actually conquered China. A large stone pillar used to exist in Lhasa but was removed by the… Read more »

George Cornell
Reader
George Cornell

I don’t think it has to be black and white Kevin. The aim has to be for balance and we have just seen what happens when there is one malicious, malevolent, psychopathic hegemon.
One hegemon with morality and sentiment for his fellow man would work efficiently but there has never been one.
Looking past the fall of the US, the next worry might well be China but their values seem so much more attractive than what we see from the US now.

kevin morris
Reader

Of course not. No you can pick the bits you like, ignore the bits you don’t and hope that those who actually call the shots in the world will respect your list- which of course they won’t! The real irony to me of this ‘debate’ is that in China, organs such as OffGuardian would not exist, because the only news organs are those officially approved of by the state. Those who read unofficial news sources would be regarded as dissidents and would be in serious danger of ill treatment or worse by the state. In Tibet, a person carrying a… Read more »

George Cornell
Reader
George Cornell

Having been lied to my whole life, I believe in the constancy of human nature, that is about it, save for Costner’s homily in Bull Durham.

Mulga Mumblebrain
Reader
Mulga Mumblebrain

Racist, Sinophobe, drivel.

kevin morris
Reader

Dear Mulga, I actually know the Chinese very well, having studied them for over forty years, and after briefly flirted with becoming a Maoist myself. The brother of a close friend is the UK leader of a particular school of Tai chi still based in China. When I gained a terminal diagnosis for cancer in 1999, I studied Qigong with a Chinese doctor, a former Red Guard during the Cultural Revolution, and daughter of a senior figure, in the CCP, responsible for the Chinese constitution. ALthough loyal to the Chinese Government, she was a Daoist. During that time, I met… Read more »

Fair dinkum
Reader
Fair dinkum

Mulga!
Where have you been?
I thought the CIA had kidnapped you.
Can you refute Kevin’s remarks ?
Has Clive Hamilton gone bonkers?
I await your sagicity.

vexarb
Reader

@Ricky Wicks.comment image

George Cornell
Reader
George Cornell

Savage primitives? Really? And how long ago did your ancestors become civilized?

Tim Groves
Reader
Tim Groves

Red China was an is a dictatorship, and the Chinese were still binding women’s feet AND frequently cutting off people’s appendages—including heads—at the same time they were invading Tibet and adding their own brand of torture and persecution to the homegrown variety. Primitive savages or not, I can tell you with absolute certainty that Tibet’s gonna rise again. The tectonic movement of the earth’s crust makes this inevitable.

Jim
Reader
Jim

“…and the Chinese were still binding women’s…”
They were binding the feet of every Chinese women? No, only the nobility did it! Before pretending to know China, at least do it with “nuances”. This arguments does not hold water.

milosevic
Reader
milosevic

the Chinese were still binding women’s feet
No, they weren’t. Whatever else the Communist Party of China did or didn’t do, they quickly put an end to that practice.

jag37777
Reader

The petro-dollar is a myth. And the petro-dollar, gold yuan etc are fantasies spread by gold traders. Max Keiser doesn’t know what he’s talking about.

John Watwood
Reader
John Watwood

All currency is a myth. The only value any currency contains is in the minds of people. A purely controlling mechanism of the ‘elites’ to enslave the masses. And I don’t see an end to it. I do see an end to the majority of the population due to Agenda 21 though.

jag37777
Reader

Not at all. Currency is virtual but it is not a myth. Currency is state credits and debits. Without it it would be very difficult to move goods and services around to where they are needed.

Seamus Padraig
Reader
Seamus Padraig

Really? Gotta Wikipedia account? Then you should go straighten them out: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petrodollar_recycling.

Francis Lee
Reader
Francis Lee

”The petro-dollar is a myth.” Really?! What was it exactly that Kissinger negotiated with the Saudis in 1973 then? The price of dates perhaps? Some of the comments on here are pathetically ignorant. The petrodollar agreement entailed the oil price being fixed in dollars which in turn meant that the US$ became an artificially overvalued currency since there was a manipulated demand for a currency which was key to the oil market. However, overvalued currencies become destabilised in the long run – the Triffin Dilemma as it is called. A very good article in Gold Money by Alisdair MacLeod today.… Read more »

Big B
Reader
Big B

I see this story all over the net: that China want to de-dollarise the world reserve currency and replace it with the ‘petro-yuan’. Like a lot of good stories: it is a myth. Sure, China want to get away from dollar hegemony …eventually. And they are diversifying their assets by buying gold. But as for the reserve currency, their main preference is the Special Drawing Rights of the IMF. There is no need to take my word for it: here is the Chairman of the PBOC, Zhou Xiaochuan, laying out the Chinese policy. The ‘petro-yuan’ is a futures contract; another… Read more »

John Watwood
Reader
John Watwood

I concur. But currency of any kind only has value in the minds of people. As long long as people have ‘faith’ in currency, believe in it whether backed by black oily substance, or shiny objects, or nothing at all, they will be enslaved. The first thing any kakistocracy does is set a currency and currency system. Why? Is it we need currency or the kakistocracies needs us to need it? I do agree that all of this shit going on is to digitize currency into a 5G IoT control grid, a OWO or NWO control system.

Mulga Mumblebrain
Reader
Mulga Mumblebrain

The Epoch Times ie the CIA cult, Falun Gong. It is to laugh.

vexarb
Reader

@Mulga. Thanks for that Lead. Googled “Falun Gong CIA connection”, got this: “‘just as is the case with Tibet, there is more to the Falun Gong case than simple persecution. Outside political forces and corporate interests can be found pushing Falun Gong into increasingly political activities, including well-funded, well-organized, and ubiquitous worldwide protests against the Chinese Communist Party. Among the foreign (predominantly Western) Friends of Falun Gong, we find the likes of Mark Palmer of Freedom House. Freedom House is a quasi-intelligence front created by the CIA-connected Open Society Institute of elite George Soros. In addition to Palmer, Freedom House… Read more »

CF
Reader
CF

Mr B You seem to be suggesting (and this is an honest enquiery) that it did not matter that Saddam Housien was planning to sell all his oil in Euros as soon as he got the UN sanctions lifted, because that is the only reason I have ever found for the 2003 Iraq war; the threat to the dollar, Libya was planning to initiate a Pan African finance system using the gold based Dina instead of the dollar and so it was attacked and Quaddafi murdered. As far as I can see any threat to the position of the Dollar… Read more »

BigB
Reader

CF: never underestimate the pure unadulterated greed of the sole hegemon (as America was then. ) They invaded Iraq because they could: for the oil. This was pre the “shale boom”; they went in and turned the taps back on. Euro considerations may have been a tertiary reason: but they could have stopped the Euro at source in 1999 – but did not. By your reasoning they should have sanctioned or invaded Europe? They raped Libya for oil and gold. The reasons were leaked by Wikileaks. Sarkozy’s reasons were: a.A desire to gain a greater share of Libya oil production,… Read more »

Savorywill
Reader

How about regime change, just for the sake of it, or getting their hands on the oil supplies in both those countries, using regime change as the excuse? That seems actually like a more plausible reason than just to circumvent their use of alternative currencies (though I am not saying that this didn’t factor into it, but it may not have been the main reason).

rogerglewis
Reader

http://www.wetube.io/video/the-3-coming-false-flag-attacks/
Both of these videos are well worth watching

vexarb
Reader

Who are we going to fight? And with what? OK, ca. 1990 NATZO (pop.700Million) managed to “take out” Serbia (pop.7M) — a country 1/100th our size. And boy, didn’t we feel good about it! So ca. 2000 “We’re gonna take out 7 countries in 5 years”. Starting with Iraq (pop.30M) — a real biggie, almost 1/20th the size of our Coalition of the Killing. But funnily enough, instead of feeling good about this heroic exploit most of the cheerleaders are silent or apologetic. But never say die, ca. 2011 NATZO have persevered and taken out 3 more little countries —… Read more »

Harry Law
Reader
Harry Law

Nice comment vexard, Dispute your figures slightly, China’s population in 2016 1.379 billion, USA population 325 million. The Chinese army have to walk normally, because if they marched in unison the earth might fall off its axis.

Tim Groves
Reader
Tim Groves

When I was a schoolboy, a long time ago, my elder brother assured me that if the Chinese all stood on chairs and then jumped off simultaneously, the impact of their combined weight crashing to the ground would generate a tidal wave that would swamp America. Although the physics of this idea is questionable, today’s Chinese leaders are confident that they wouldn’t have to attempt it in order to bring the US to its knees. They think that all they have to do is to buy themselves enough influence so that they can manipulate US policy as desired. And they… Read more »

Mulga Mumblebrain
Reader
Mulga Mumblebrain

I prefer the version that an old Commo mate of my Dad told us. He was in Beijing in the 50s, and met some old PLA Marshal at a reception. He told the old fellow that people in China were scared stiff of the ‘Yellow Peril’ invading Australia. The old chap had a long drag on his cigarette, laughed loudly, and declared through his interpreter that all the Chinese had to do was move to their southern coast, face Australia, all piss in unison, and wash the Australians all away.

Brutally Remastered
Reader
Brutally Remastered

Well, that neatly encapsulates the tone and detail of Australian diplomacy: thanks for sharing.

rizzeh
Reader

Like in the Lenin’s quote – the capitalists will sell us the rope with which we’ll hang them.

archie1954
Reader

US hegemony was built on its reserve currency. It is maintained at the end of a gun but those days are quickly drawing to a close. Why? Because American Administrations have themselves. destroyed their own soft power by using the reserve currency and financial control of the world to attack other nations’ economies. The US overreached and is now going to pay for it!

George Cornell
Reader
George Cornell

They deserve to get it good and hard as Mencken said about the common man in democracies

George Cornell
Reader
George Cornell

Ps is that a simian crease in the hand holding the Franklin? How poetic!

RJ Vela
Reader
RJ Vela

You’re probably already hearing reports that interests rates in the US are on the rise. No pun intended here, you can google “Consumer is Maxed Out” – and read on how americans are finding it harder than ever to increase credit. This means that US foreign policy couldnt pick a worst time to antagonize its so called idealogical enemies. Its the US own fault that their will be major losses coming to its hegemony in the next few years which will ultimately impact the way of life in America in a very bad way. If we even make it that… Read more »

mohandeer
Reader

I’ve been saying it for many months and I’ll saay it again. The US would rather plunge the whole world into a nuclear war even at the cost of it’s own citizens(like they’ll have any say in the matter)rather than give up it’s pole position of supremacy. If it can’t have it all, no-one will, believing that if they destroy half the planet they will still be on top.

mohandeer
Reader

Reblogged this on Worldtruth.

John Marks
Reader
John Marks

If Japan is smart, they’ll do a deal with Russia: Russia returns the Kurils in return for Japan kicking the Yanks out of the Ryukyus and declaring neutrality.
Japan would also be sensible to return Diaoyu to China and Dokdo to Korea and finally make friends with its neighbours instead of continuing as an expendable pawn in America’s warmongering.
Finally, Japan could sweeten the deal with Russia by heavy infrastructural investment in the Russian Far East.

George Cornell
Reader
George Cornell

After the US bombed the bejesus out of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and poisoned their atmosphere and earth for a great long time, and gave them DNA changes with long lasting effects, I have difficulty understanding why the Japanese have no sense of pride, self-respect and valour when it comes to the US. They know better than anyone how unnecessary the bombing was, the Japanese already knowing the game was lost, as did Truman and Hirohito. What an absolutely disgusting gang of psychos.

Tim Groves
Reader
Tim Groves

Thank you, John. It is always reassuring to read the opinions of an expert in these matters. Individually, the peoples of Japan, Korea and China are as friendly as the mass media and official government propaganda will allow them to be. Trade and tourism are booming, and Japan currently has 730,000 Chinese residents and 450,000 South Koreans. Everything is hunky-dory until every so often somebody comes along on the TV screen or in the newspapers and spoils it all by mentioning the war. I did it once, but I think I got away with it. As for “returning” islands, all… Read more »

Tom Welsh
Reader
Tom Welsh

Mr Xi has just been entertaining Mr Kim to make sure they are both in agreement before Mr Kim goes to Washington.
Mr Putin has kept in touch with the Japanese government so that they are aware of realities.
The difference between Mr Xi’s China and Mr Hussein’s Iraq or Colonel Qadafi’s Libya? The reason why Mr Xi will neither be hanged nor sodomised with a bayonet?
S-400, anti-ship cruise missiles, hypersonic anti-ship missiles, undetectable diesel submarines, Su-35, J-20A…