So DID the Guardian back war on Iraq?

Philip Roddis

If I and a hundred likeminded others devoted ourselves 24/7 to rebutting the drivel above and below the line in the Guardian, we couldn’t make a dent. It would be like despatching midges, in August on a Highland bog, by crushing them one by one between thumb and forefinger.

So I seldom bother. But a few instances this year have seen me obliged to make some sort of response to twaddle too egregious to let pass. One was Matthew d’Ancona’s smug desire to see market forces rein in the purveyors of ‘fake news’ via the kitemarking of such online crusaders for truth as Full Fact, led by tory party donor Michael Samuels.

The other two were below the line. In an exchange with one btl commentator, back in April and over – what else? – Syria, I was told the idea of oil being a factor in the invasion of Iraq had been ‘thoroughly debunked’. I felt it incumbent, though it’s generally easier on such matters to spout nonsense than refute it, to put him straight on this small point.

More recently a commentator correctly asserted that the Guardian had supported the invasion of Iraq. This drew flat contradiction from another to the effect that, au contraire,  the Graun had opposed the war. I let it pass but, for reasons too mundane to test your patience with, it popped into my head today between lunch and walking the woofer.

A click or two of the mouse and here we are: an Observer editorial (pedants note, Observer is a sister of The Guardian within Guardian Media Group) of Sunday, January 19, 2003Its title? Iraq: the case for decisive action. The case, not to put too fine a point on things, for a war which – sanctions having already killed 500,000 children – proceeded with Shock And Awe to:

  • blast Iraq with depleted uranium (aka chemical warfare) …
  • snuff out the lives – and I’m being ultra conservative here – of hundreds of thousands of Iraqi civilians …
  • stoke the flames of Salafist terror …
  • give us the infamies of Abu Ghraib …
  • and – because, guess what, it turns out oil was indeed an incentive – enrich the very men who’d taken the decision to invade.

 

Of course, this was all a very  long time ago, and things have changed massively since then. I mean, we’ve had that nice Mr Obama to restore America’s honour and soul …

… and it’s such  a crying shame the delightful Mrs Clinton wuz robbed by the Russians.

But though it was  such a long time ago, and though so much  has got better since, here’s how the Guardian – oops, Observer – began that January 2003 editorial.

A war with Iraq has become more likely in the past week. Thursday’s discovery of undeclared poison gas shells was insufficient to trigger war alone. But here was the first concrete, and predictable, confirmation that Iraq’s co-operation with Hans Blix’s UN weapons inspectors has been less than complete. And Saddam Hussein’s defiant speech on Friday even disappointed those who still hope that the Iraqi leader might choose comfortable exile in Libya or Belarus.

One thing which has been stressed too little in recent weeks is that it is Iraq’s choices that have brought war closer. The debate in Britain and Europe continues to focus largely on what America is doing and why. Too often, it is overlooked that it is Iraq which remains, at the eleventh hour, in defiance of the will of its region and the wider world. That will is still to find a sensible resolution to the current crisis without war. The coercive diplomacy that could yet lead to Saddam’s disarmament or his disposal by his own side must be pursued. Indeed, the military build-up remains the best strategy for seeking to disarm him, short of war. Yet he still shows signs of frustrating the demands of December’s UN resolution. If this continues, few analysts doubt that the United States will seek support for a military attack. It is becoming equally clear that Tony Blair’s Britain would participate. Would we be right to do so?

There are good – and bad – arguments for and against military intervention. And there are some on both sides who have relied on weak and intellectually dishonest positions to further their own cause. It devalues debate to belittle Tony Blair as ‘President Bush’s poodle’ – and the crude anti-Americanism which often accompanies this charge also overlooks the nuanced way in which the Prime Minister has sought with some success to influence the approach of his superpower ally. It is similarly unilluminating when detractors dismiss the Bush presidency as ‘stupid’. The President, regardless of his own capacities, is surrounded by some brilliant advocates of his visceral beliefs. Equally, however, it does not help casually to conflate any threat from Saddam with that from al-Qaeda, rather than detailing the demonstrable dangers posed by Iraq itself.

The arguments for coercive pressure may well end in war. But they combine two laudable motivations. The first is the nature of Saddam Hussein’s regime and the call by many Iraqi exiles and dissidents for him to be overthrown. The appalling 1980s nerve-gasing of the Kurds is well documented. Less widely appreciated is that there are few Iraqi families which have not suffered directly, either in the massacres which crushed the 1991 uprisings, or by the violence routinely deployed by Iraq’s secret police. Both Bush and Blair could have emphasised more just how bad Saddam’s republic of fear has been for his people and the extent to which ending it is a desirable end in itself.

They could also have stressed more energetically that this dispute is not about oil…

Couldn’t happen these days, could it? Not with so sternly vigilant a monitor of arrant power as Guardian Media Group holding it to account.


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Chris Friel (@ChrisFriel7)
Reader

What the MSM aren’t doing but should do is shine a light on the pro-Israel hawks who are adept at manufacturing fake news. For example, as I show here, prior to 2015 Corbyn was not regarded as antisemitic – not even by his worst enemies. Soft on terrorism yes, but antisemitic no. The smear had to evolve.
https://www.academia.edu/37379708/Who_Let_the_Dogs_Out_-_MuralGaga

Pincus
Reader
Pincus

All global Mainstream Media are the realm of Fake News.

Dungroanin
Reader
Dungroanin

4 leading articles on dissing Corbyn this morning, not one open to comments. (no comments on McCain the shadow king of America hagiofest either) The Obsessive rides forth into the valley of doom, half a league… It was Russian canons that time too. As for Chulov, any photos of him reporting from the ground? or can’t they find the right face for that borg collective? SCL/ Atlantic Council / Bell Pottinger – ‘resistance is futile, why are you all STILL resisting? Stop it at once and follow your orders or we will let lose the terrors upon you and your… Read more »

James Connolly
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James Connolly

They’re clearly not interested in finding out whether ordinary people agree McCain is a hero and Corbyn a racist. The great and the good say they are, so that’s that.

Bryan
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Bryan

Good work Mr Roddis, a timely reminder of the centrality of oil to the Iraq war (and evidence to back this up) plus helpful clarity that the Graun’s recent slide is not that recent !

james bate
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james bate

Been an Observer reader since Harold Evans fell out with Murdoch, wasn’t an obvious call as it was then owned by Tiny Rowland. Been a while since I could bring myself to buy it though.

They’ve had a thing about Iraq since one of their cub reporters Fazard Bazoft was hanged by Saddam for being an Israeli spy, even then I thought he was dubious, knowing what we do now I think it’s clear he was used or compromised & the paper doesn’t come out too well.

Thomas Prentice
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Thomas Prentice

Obama was far more evil that Clinton, George W Bush or DIck Cheney. But who knew at the time, immersed as we were in the tsunami of Obama as the reincarnation of FDR and JFK/LBJ? (And he was classey, wuzzen’t he?) It was the same schtick we fell for with Billary in 1992. Instead Clinton/Obama did the neoliberal work of The Businessmen’s War Against the New Deal (and New Frontier/Great Society) and accomplished more than the wettest wet dream of the right wing neoliberal fascist handlers of Reagan, H. W. Bush and Bush/Cheney along with the beltway think tanks ranging… Read more »

Ghost Ship
Reader
Ghost Ship

Refute one lie in the Guardian and they produce twenty more. They now exist in the Bush regime’s new reality. The latest is today’s article entitled “Civilians in Syria’s last rebel stronghold brace for final battle” by Martin Chulov. It suggests that there are three million people under siege but I suspect that just like claims for East Aleppo, East Ghouta and Daraa it is a gross over estimation with about 1,500,000 people being closer to the truth. It also suggests that many of those were displaced from East Aleppo, East Ghouta and Daraa but from memory about 30,000 were… Read more »

Paul X
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Paul X

There is never a mention of Syrisn and Russian escape corridors. The Italian aristocratic UN man pretends to want to help but doesn’t – same as last time. The talk is all of a Syrian chemical attack; you’d be forgiven for thinking it had already happened they are so sure about it. Will the real opposition then show its face? US, French and British air strikes with something offered by Israel? Will they push ahead and attack the Regime full on? They seem understandably a bit nervous of doing that; after all they might lose or get bogged down with… Read more »

JudyJ
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JudyJ

The point you make about escape corridors had struck me as well, I thought I must have dreamt RT’s report about four days ago direct from the Syrian/Russian humanitarian corridor from Idlib at Abu al-Duhur, and their interviews with escaping civilians when I heard de Mistura suggest at the UN that it would be a good idea for the UN to think about setting up humanitarian corridors for Idlib civilians. No acknowledgement by him, or the MSM reporting on this proposed “UN initiative”, of the arrangements in place since the end of July.

zach
Reader
zach

The fact the leftmost boundary of mainstream British media sees D’Ancona as some kind of moral arbiter says it all really.

Adopt a Muj
Reader
Adopt a Muj

Note how the number articles critical of US actions around the world have suddenly and sharply dwindled, lately.

And when you spot an article like this pointing at the crimes committed by USGOV and agencies, you see this article is published on Saturday and more likely on a Sunday … when readership at its lowest on a weekly cycle.

Other days, John-adopt-a-muj[ahidin]-McCain is a Maverick and a hero, of course!

wardropper
Reader

Like the author, I have for a long time been inclined to “let it pass” when faced with the wicked distortions of reality perpetrated on a daily basis by our once-admired Jokeiad. This little note is simply to make me feel a little better after a bout of projectile vomiting through the nose caused by seeing the following one time too often: “The Guardian is editorially independent – our journalism is free from the influence of billionaire owners or politicians. No one edits our editor. No one steers our opinion”. That outright lie is 100% in line with Macchiavellian and… Read more »

vexarb
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vexarb

From Britain’s very own Vanessa Beeley, Patreon Aug 31 at 7:56pm ”As I was walking back up to the Old City yesterday, I saw the lorries and bulldozers removing the barriers that have stayed in place during the 7 years that Western-backed terrorists occupied the suburbs and surrounding countryside of Damascus – in Eastern Ghouta and Yarmouk. This is a hugely symbolic moment for Syrian civilians in the ancient city of Damascus, especially in the primarily Christian area of Bab Touma which was mercilessly targeted by mortars from Eastern Ghouta for 7 years. Mortars which tore into crowds of schoolchildren,… Read more »

vexarb
Reader
vexarb

Japanese govt donates medical equipment to the Syrian govt via WHO:

https://sana.sy/en/?p=145866

What medical equipment has the UK regime donatedto the Syrian government headed by medical Dr.Assad?

Jonny
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Jonny

Chlorine is a steriliser. Didn’t they supply chlorine shells via the white helmets? The whole situation is so depressing as an Englishman, alas, satire is all I can offer.

balkydj
Reader

if Balky remembers correctly, there was a rumour that the British Ambassador left one of those lil’ plastic cups, for eyewash >> Knowing Assad’s qualifications, they thought it humorous 😉

Harry Stotle
Reader
Harry Stotle

The Guardian seems to be suggesting the final, bitter stages of the failed US/Saudi coup in Syria, in other words the end of war, is actually a humanitarian disaster!
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/sep/01/civilians-in-syrias-last-rebel-stronghold-brace-for-final-battle

Does Chulov not understand that Orwell’s mantra ‘war is peace’ has literally become the cornerstone of US imperial policy?.

Frankly Speaking
Reader
Frankly Speaking

Good article, but most of us are surprised, that is in fact the reason why we are here. Since the Mancunian Guardian Of The Truth moved south it has progressively been overtaken by the Establishment to eventually become the Guardian Of The Establishment in all aspects. They deceptively wave a bit of feminasty crap and display some eco warrior rainbows at the gullible Millennial Brigade to fool them into thinking that the Guardian is their spiritual home.

rtj1211
Reader

It is now controlled by American Neocons, and glory be, as a result it toes the neocon line obediently.

Frankly Speaking
Reader
Frankly Speaking

First paragraph should read “…not surprised…” of course.

Kaya3
Reader
Kaya3

I followed the link “put him straight” in the third paragraph which I presumed was going to show evidence that the Iraq invasion and regime change was all about oil, however the article it took me to was some vague thing about the UNSC and them needing to sort their shit out. Apologies if I missed something, can someone tell me what it was? Alternatively does it link to the wrong article?

vexarb
Reader
vexarb

Meanwhile in the real world, far from the Fraudian Fairy Land of Mad Mullahs and Backward Bigots, Iran is Developing Refinery Catalysts for its own use and the world market. Iran is now the second country in the world, after the US, that makes such high-tech catalysts, noting that 9 Iranian refineries and 11 petrochemical plants have begun to use the homegrown catalysts. The new technology helps Iran save around $1 billion each year, and reap $60 billion in profit per annum through exports, Sobhani added. Export of the new catalyst is now on the agenda, he noted, saying Iran… Read more »

vexarb
Reader
vexarb

Philip Roddis, thank you for the money map. I dont knowwho owns Exxon or Total but British Petroleum and Royal Dutch Shell are Rothschild companies. Which ties in with the fact that in those days the Guardian Trust always had a representative from Rothschild on board. What I found even more egregious than their support for B.Liar’s gang rape of Iraq was the Guardian’s praise of Brown’s financial wizardry and the robust health of the British economy under Brown’s stewardship — from financing B.Liar’s war to Quantitative Easing. Both Brown and B.Liar were r.warded with directorships in Rothschild companies, for… Read more »

Francis Lee
Reader
Francis Lee

Yes, who could forget Gordon Brown’s fatuous claim that he had achieved, ‘An end to boom and bust’ in 2007. In much the same vein I think it was, just beaten by a head by Sir John Templeton’s analysis of financial market euphoria regarding asset-price bubbles and their imminent bursting . The financial community were convinced that the bubble would last forever, they always do, uttering the four most expensive words in the in economics. ‘This time it’s different.’ These sort of claims always occur when the bubble is at its most febrile inflexion point. That is the time to… Read more »

Dungroanin
Reader
Dungroanin

Bubbles are how the banks convert the imaginary money deposits to plebs into crystallised real money into the bankers own pockets.
Rinse and repeat – the rich get richer while the rest get fleeced. We keep letting them!

mog
Reader

In autumn 2002 Ed Vulliamy, a correspondent for Britain’s Sunday Observer newspaper, stumbled on a terrible truth that many of us already suspected. In a world-exclusive, he persuaded Mel Goodman, a former senior Central Intelligence Agency official who still had security clearance, to go on record that the CIA knew there were no WMD in Iraq. Everything the US and British governments were telling us to justify the coming attack on Iraq were lies. Then something even more extraordinary happened. The Observer failed to print the story. In his book Flat Earth News, Nick Davies recounts that Vulliamy, one of… Read more »

tutisicecream
Reader

Graun’s sister-in-war the Oddserver suppressing real news! What ever next…Polonium tea, KGB spooks and doorknobs….

Robbobbobin
Reader
Robbobbobin

“[Viner] was appointed by the board, made up of 100% white males, all City or Oxbridge, and connected by who knows what fraternal order.” Viner won a ballot of editorial staff, for which four Guardian Media Group journalists stood as candidates, and was thus assured a place on the shortlist ultimately selected by the board. The job was advertised externally and about 30 people applied in total. The GMG used an executive headhunting outfit to help manage the process. I seem to recall that Viner was not Rusbridger’s preference for his successor, but he had no role in the process… Read more »

JJ139
Reader
JJ139

One of the other 4 internal candidates was arch zionist Freedland. Cant imagine he would have been any less terrible than Viner.

Robbobbobin
Reader
Robbobbobin

“One of the other 4 internal candidates was arch zionist Freedland. Cant imagine he would have been any less terrible than Viner.” The four candidates on the staff ballot did not include Freedland. He may have put his name forward as an anonymous applicant, I have neither checked nor asked. The ballot was organised by the NUJ, so may have been returned and audited by Electoral Commission. I think (again unchecked) that the Guardian Media Group executive board met all four staff ballot candidates but their conclusion about them or any other candidate was, like Rusbridger’s, not binding on the… Read more »

Jen
Reader
Jen

It would have been like choosing among five variations on Tweedledee and Tweedledum, only one would have needed the latest model high-powered microscopes to find any differences.

manfromatlan
Reader

Not sure who approved Viner though I’m sure she was vetted by MI-5 and Zionist Central 🙂 Regarding the Scott Trust though Jonathan Cook has this to say: HSBC and the sham of Guardian’s Scott Trust https://www.jonathan-cook.net/blog/2015-03-03/hsbc-and-the-sham-of-guardians-scott-trust/ This comparative study of editorials at (Canada’s ‘liberal’ news paper) The Toronto Star vs The New York Times by Hanan Mian Ahmad York University http://cjms.fims.uwo.ca/issues/03-01/ahmad.pdf ABSTRACT This paper presents the coverage pattern of the front pages of The New York Times and The Toronto Star from March 1, 2003 to April 15, 2003 regarding: A-coverage of antiwar protests and B- the coverage of… Read more »

George Cornell
Reader
George Cornell

Agree. But do object to calling it the Iraq war. It did not fit the definition of a war but was an illegal invasion.

manfromatlan
Reader

Every war since Korea 1950 was an illegal invasion then 🙁

George Cornell
Reader
George Cornell

Every invasion you mean 🙂

manfromatlan
Reader

Nafeez Ahmed, an investigative reporter fired by the Guardian for his work exposing the connection between Israel’s attacks on Gaza and its interests in Gaza’s natural resources, exposes the sham of the Guardian’s Scott Trust: https://www.jonathan-cook.net/blog/2015-03-03/hsbc-and-the-sham-of-guardians-scott-trust/ Ahmed details that the Scott Trust board members have deep ties to HSBC. Consider, for example, board member Anthony Salz’s CV, care of Ahmed: “a senior investment banker and executive vice chairman of Rothschild, and a director at NM Rothschild and Sons. He was a key legal adviser to Guinness during the notorious share-rigging scandal, helped Rupert Murdoch form BSkyB, and was vice chair… Read more »

Robbobbobin
Reader
Robbobbobin

“So the UK’s involvement in the war was still about seizing oil.” Oh, for heaven’s sake, stop cruising along on a sea of innuendo, endlessly re-implicating the bleeding obvious. Of course the Iraq war was superficially “all about oil” – “kick their ass and take their gas”, as one American pre-teenager, probably channeling Daddy or a bumper sticker, posted in at least one online “forum” at the time. In fact, far more interesting insights, if you insist on staying in the realms of easy conjecture rather than documented fact, come from looking at possible explanations for the oil rationale in… Read more »

Jim Scott
Reader
Jim Scott

I am not sure about much of what you said in your post Robbobbobin because I found your emphatic but erratic writing style difficult to understand, which I readily admit coul be due to my own lack of patience. However I do understand your statement that – Of course the Iraq War superficially “was about oil”. The war was in fact principally and overwhelmingly about oil as Paul Wolfowitz attested in Singapore. The US deputy defence secretary, Paul Wolfowitz – who has already undermined Tony Blair’s position over weapons of mass destruction (WMD) by describing them as a “bureaucratic” excuse… Read more »

vexarb
Reader
vexarb

Manfromatlan, thank you, it confirms in sordid detail what I gleaned from my own amateur attempts to understand what drove the Fraudian’s insane editorial policy (in those days I was still a reader). Follow the money.

manfromatlan
Reader

Thanks, vexarb. We are all searching for the truth here.

George cornell
Reader
George cornell

At the time she was appointed I looked up the members of the board and who are you saying was not male?

Robbobbobin
Reader
Robbobbobin

Your “research” appears to be fucked and now you can’t read either?

George cornell
Reader
George cornell

No need to be abusive. Since you contradicted what I said you were asked to supply the evidence. Instead you lose control of yourself. So who was not a white male? Should be easy for you to reply instead of blustering. But the point was that the control of the Guardian was by a board that was completely unrepresentative of its constituency, and contained no one with a an easily discernible career in foreign affairs, social services, charity, or in the core issues projected by the Guardian as important to them. And no one of colour, etc. And what confidence… Read more »

Robbobbobin
Reader
Robbobbobin

“No need to be abusive.” No need for you to lose control of the capitalization of your own surname. At least not within the same BTL. “Since you contradicted what I said you were asked to supply the evidence.” Bullshitty use of the passive(-aggressive) voice there. But that aside: you want “do your own research and do it properly this time” in little schoolboy phraseology instead? OK: “I leave the establishment of the facts of the matter as an exercise for the reader”. Diddykums feeling better now? “Instead you lose control of yourself. So who was not a white male?… Read more »

George cornell
Reader
George cornell

So you have no evidence then.

Thomas Peterson
Reader
Thomas Peterson

Are you freebasing or something? Dude only asked a question.

manfromatlan
Reader

Also on the Guardian website:

Blair prepares troops for Iraq action
Fri 20 Dec 2002 12.53 GMT
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2002/dec/20/foreignpolicy.uk and,

The legal case for war with Iraq
Matthew Happold
Thu 13 Mar 2003 13.03 GMT
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2003/mar/13/qanda.politics

So, the despicable Guardian has consistently made the case for war since back when.

Robbobbobin
Reader
Robbobbobin

“So, the despicable Guardian has consistently made the case for war since back when.”

Have you actually read either of the articles you link to, other than their headlines?

If I were Happold, especially, and you had a real or traceable name, or this were a publication which had the ear of the mostly self-important bunch of bullshitters comprising the class of “important people who matter”, or you had at least a sizeable pile of readies, I would sue you shitless.

manfromatlan
Reader

Withdraw my comment about Happold, with apologies (for truth, not because I’m not traceable or, ‘scared shitless’). The rest of my post stands, and given Guardian’s abject failures since then as shown by Jonathan Cook and Nafeez Ahmed, germane to this article.

Robbobbobin
Reader
Robbobbobin

“Withdraw my comment about Happold, with apologies (for truth, not because I’m not traceable or, ‘scared shitless’). The rest of my post stands…” Whoever said you were ‘scared shitless (quotes salient)? I’ve read the thread again, even the bits of it I wrote myself, so should have been able to remember, and a provisional answer seems to be “no-one”. Perhaps you could clarify with a hint or twho? As for your first link, to a report by “Staff and agencies” (read: junior- or sub-editors and stringers or hacks) on a BFBS broadcast by Tony Blair to “the troops”: nn what… Read more »

Willem
Reader
Willem

I read the article

Happold says:

‘It is difficult to know on exactly what grounds the government is basing its arguments that that is a legal basis for war, …’ but as he explains further in the article, the government had no legal basis for war.

But Happold sticks to ‘difficult’

Sounds like a pretty biased opinion to me

Robbobbobin
Reader
Robbobbobin

Many laymen who seek to respect the opinion of lawyers very often find themselves nevertheless objecting when the resulting legal opinion is not entirely affirmatively entirely congruent with their own view of the situation. These are usually the same people who tend to believe that The Law is there to cast a floodlight on contested situations when even the most superficial observation of The Law as it actually is reveals that spotlights are the sole illuminants made available to it. Like the rest of us in less exalted professions, lawyers have to do the best they can do with what… Read more »

JudyJ
Reader
JudyJ

I gave up respecting the opinion of lawyers a long time ago, especially when they select to give an ‘opinion’ rather than rely on what the law says. Who can forget Sir Keir Starmer on BBC Question Time declaring that the US/UK and France were right to bomb Syria. Innocent until proven guilty? I always thought that was THE most fundamental legal principle, but clearly not in Starmer’s legal mind. Ironically I note from his Wiki page that he worked as a defence lawyer specialising in human rights!

manfromatlan
Reader

Sadly, the cowardice of the western journalist class is all too apparent here, but I couldn’t let my initial comment about Happold supporting the war stand. ‘Ambiguity’ is about the best the Guardian could come up with in the 2003.

Post 2008, with change in ownership of the Trust as shown by Nafeez Ahmed, the ‘liberal’ Guardian became a lapdog for Zionist interests.

tutisicecream
Reader

Well put Philip I understand that the Guardian has always eventually towed the establishment line. Now it is the establishment. It is owned. I remember that for example the BTL was pretty open until the Ukraine Coup. For a few months it was populated by many who saw through the increasingly fabricated narrative.The repetition of false memes rewriting the original reports of events as they had unfolded in Kiev. After the downing of MH-17 the whole censorship BTL started to shift up several gears. The day of that terrible event I was driving from Sochi in the direction of Moscow… Read more »

Jen
Reader
Jen

Have just seen news that Donetsk People’s Republic leader Alexander Zakharchenko has been killed in a bomb blast in a cafe.

Zakharchenko: a hero to his people and to others beyond the DPR.

RIP Zakharchenko.

Paul X
Reader
Paul X

My experience about BTL at the Guardian is the same; Ukraine sparked off a torrent of protest at the blatant mis reporting of the likes of Luke Harding and Shaun Walker which flew in the face of what most people knew was happening. Then came the clamp down. I was chucked for criticising Freedland. Nowadays they don’t give you live BTL with its ‘recommendation’ tally – of some interest – but a selected group of comments. The Guardian is in lock step with the FCO and the spooks. There is never a chink in their ‘Assad is an evil monster’… Read more »

tutisicecream
Reader

And then there was this piece which sums up the faux bleatings on feminist, gender, family life and war issues at the Graun https://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/mar/05/ukraine-women-fighting-frontline

A promo for the Nazi Aidar battalion and its gender credentials. Some what similar to the bon homie reporting of the White Helmets except that because they are Jihadists and oppress women’s rights they are all men…

Antonyl
Reader
Antonyl

But every fart in Kashmir will be published. India & Hindus can get lost. Pakistan on the other hand will hardly get an article with comments on.