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Intelligence Spats: Australia, Britain and Huawei

Binoy Kampmark

A note of fraternal tension has been registered between the United Kingdom and Australia. It began with Britain’s decision to permit China’s technology giant Huawei a role in the construction of the country’s 5G network.

While the decision is qualified to non-core functions, as UK officials term it, the irritations to the United States and, it follows, Australia, have been far from negligible.

Members of the US Congress have been clear that letting Huawei into the stables of security risks future trade deals. US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, on a visit to the UK, has been equally insistent on the dangers.

When you allow the information of your citizens of the national security information of your citizens to transit a network that the Chinese Communist party has a legal mandate to obtain, it creates risk.”

In Munich attending an international security conference, US Defence Secretary Mark Esper warned that,

Reliance on Chinese 5G vendors … could render our partners critical systems vulnerable to disruption, manipulation and espionage.”

As for US President Donald Trump, the words “apoplectic” and “fury” figured in responding to the UK decision.

Australian officials have relished their role in telling the old, long-in tooth Mother Country off.

Simon Gilding, director of the Australian Signals Directorate till December, suggested in The Strategist that the UK was putting its faith in “a flawed and outdated cybersecurity model to convince themselves that they can manage the risk that Chinese intelligence services could use Huawei’s access to UK telco networks to insert bad code.”

Gilding does not mince his words.

5G decisions reflect one of those quietly pivotal moments that crystallise a change in world affairs.”

The British decision had been “disappointing” in “doing the wrong thing” on the technology. It had not considered, for instance, Australian testing in the field.

“I was,” he smugly recalled, “part of the team in the Australian Signals Directorate that tried to design a suite of cybersecurity controls that would give the government confidence that hostile intelligence services could not leverage their national vendors to gain access to our 5G networks.”

Measures of mitigation were designed with the express purpose of preventing a state actor from gaining access to the networks. All failed.

The UK government has been attempting to reassure allies within the “Five Eyes” agreement that any security concerns are unjustified. UK Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab spent a good deal of his time during this month’s visit to Canberra attempting to assuage members of the Federal Parliament Intelligence and Foreign Affairs Committees. That effort seemed to fall flat.

In a report that was published in the Sydney Morning Herald, Deputy Intelligence Committee Chair and Labor MP Anthony Byrne was irate, notably at Raab’s response that the Huawei decision was a “technical” if “difficult” matter, but hardly political.

“How would you feel,” Byrne is reported to have asked of Raab, “if the Russians laid down infrastructure in your own networks? That’s how we feel about Huawei.”

Officially, Byrne gave the impression that things had gone rather well in “a full and frank discussion regarding 5G, trade and strategic challenges.” Privately, that same Byrne was cocksure, daring, even rude.

According to the source reported in the Sydney Morning Herald, “He basically said: ‘I’ll raise you my ASD [Australian Signals Directorate] against your GCHQ [Government Communications Headquarters].” China, he argued, had become an “existential” threat to Australia, being both its largest trading partner and most formidable “security threat”.

Few others were privy to the discussions that took place between Raab and various Australian parliamentarians. Parliament’s Intelligence and Security Committee’s Liberal MP Andrew Hastie was present, as was Foreign Affairs Committee chair, Liberal senator David Fawcett. The other person to bear witness to discussions was the UK High Commissioner Vicki Treadell.

For Treadell, the matter was obvious. Someone in the meeting had ratted. As the ABC subsequently found out, “measured” and “stern” letters were duly sent from the High Commissioner’s Office to both committee chairs chiding them for the leaks.

Despite failing to confirm the existence of such letters, the UK Commission being supposedly “unable to comment on private briefings, or on any information pertaining to these private briefings”, the shells had been fired.

Feeling put out, Parliament’s intelligence and security committee cancelled a planned visit to the UK scheduled to take place in March, preferring the more reliable, anti-Huawei environs of Washington.

The official, anodyne explanation for the cancellations was put down to advice given by Australia’s High Commissioner in the UK “as he advised that counterpart committees in the UK have not yet reconstituted following the UK’s December election.”

The reasons given to the ABC by a member of the intelligence committee proved more forthright.

If this is the attitude of the British, we may as well visit the Americans who we can trust more on this stuff.”

A right royal spat, indeed, and one not without its juvenile connotations.

Dr. Binoy Kampmark was a Commonwealth Scholar at Selwyn College, Cambridge. He lectures at RMIT University, Melbourne. Email: [email protected]

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MASTER OF UNIVE
MASTER OF UNIVE
Feb 20, 2020 11:33 PM

NATO & the Security Establishment aren’t dumb enough to facilitate Huawei market share or linkages to the western nodes of cybernetic control. The Republic of China is dreaming in Technicolor if they think Huawei will ever attain system control for 5-G telecommunications.

If the dumb arse Five Eyes plus One ever concede system operations to the pinko Commie bastards of either China or Russian Federation it would signal just how ignorant leadership was in the west as opposed to alternatives.

CANADA’s CSEC & CSIS will not support Huawei technological inroads either.
Politically, Huawei & China have no possible or probable chance of ever getting signed contracts to maintain systems for infrastructure or telecommunications infrastructure.

MOU

Martin Usher
Martin Usher
Feb 20, 2020 6:50 PM

Its no coincidence that the relaxation of monopoly controls over the last 20 years or so has coincided with the systematic outsourcing of manufacturing and development. Corporations grew to monopoly or near-monopoly positions by mergers and aquisitions with that market dominance leading to great cashflow and profits while simultaneously shedding what is unnecessary overhead. It was a process that was described fashionably as the ‘Smiley Faced Curve’. What could possibly go wrong?

The problem with this model is that it assumed that ‘the rest of the world’ was going to remain a combination sweatshop and market for products — essentially this ‘rest of the world’ (aka “China”) was going to continue to make low priced products indefinitely with the corporations in the US just putting a marketing spin (and huge markup) on them. This ecosystem was going to be policed by intellectual property agreements that guranteed that tribute would continue to be paid for long periods, maybe indefinitely. The setup came crashing down when new technologies were developed because they were not only developed outside the US but also not by US companies. Suddenly you had a key technology that wasn’t ‘owned’ by a US company, as 4G was, but by a Chinese one (Huawei owns about 60% of the patents needed to implement 5G). The political response to this has been classic “FUD” — “Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt”. The goal is to cripple the Chinese suppliers in order to give US ones the two years or so necessary to catch up. The noise will sound convincing to anyone who doesn’t know the technologies but it sounds horribly like Grade ‘A’ BS to anyone who has an inkling how things work.

The problem for many of us is that we’ve been warning people this would happen for many years. It doesn’t take genius to understand that if you move jobs outside a country then the skills that are needed to do those jobs decline and eventually become extinct. Some outsourcing is inevitable, even desirable, but the wholesale downsizing that’s characterized manufacturing has decimated the skills base leading to a serious, chronic, shortage of skilled workers. This isn’t obvious at first (although the Wall Street Journal had an article 15 years or so decrying the problems in hiring in engineering) because the focus shifts to lucrative low overhead development like the apps culture, which, lucrative or not, is really a derivative of the underlying technology rather than a contributor to it.

Sue
Sue
Feb 20, 2020 3:23 AM

I wonder what the West would look like without all its paranoid projections? It would turn to dust and collapse into thin air.

Glenn Greenwald is being hounded and Julian Assange is about to begin extradition proceedings partly for telling us that the rogue states of the West have already infiltrated everyone’s devices and TVs. So come on in, China. The more the merrier.

Sue
Sue
Feb 20, 2020 3:25 AM
Reply to  Sue

PS Binoy, thank you for all your hard work reporting what the corporate press won’t. It’s so very appreciated.

Jack_Garbo
Jack_Garbo
Feb 20, 2020 2:09 AM

Why bother with the Australians? They do what the US tells them. Finish. If there’s any (continued) spying to done it’ll be by the Yanks, regardless of the better Chinese communications technology. So, little Oz will trot along behind its master and fade into the 20thC, while the rest of the world goes forward. Once a penal colony, now on permanent parole, reporting to its probation officer every single day. Pitiful.

Richard Le Sarc
Richard Le Sarc
Feb 20, 2020 7:23 AM
Reply to  Jack_Garbo

Just look at the sad, sick, joke that is the NBN to see how Austfailia will handle 5G.

Antonym
Antonym
Feb 20, 2020 1:48 AM

The only two reasons to buy Huawei 5G are, cheapest and 5G is top for spying on all your residents plus giving the Chinese a first class seat too next to the NSA & Mi6.

Nothing wrong with present 3G or 4G, nor European Ericsson, Nokia or Alcatel.

Richard Le Sarc
Richard Le Sarc
Feb 20, 2020 7:25 AM
Reply to  Antonym

The power working really hard to control the Internet and the cybersphere is dear little Israel, everybody’s favourite ethnocracy and apartheid regime. China is a big, fat, fly in that ointment, eh Antsie.

lundiel
lundiel
Feb 20, 2020 7:58 AM
Reply to  Antonym

I disagree. This isn’t about phones, It’s all about bandwidth. 5G will lead to a revolution in tech only limited by storage. There’s no real prospect of driverless cars with 4G but 5 can handle the sheer volume of data needed. You can then apply that to virtually anything including robots.
Anyway, it’s already here so best make the most of it.

anon
anon
Feb 20, 2020 3:43 PM
Reply to  lundiel

“Anyway, it’s already here so best make the most of it.”

Sounds like the sort of argument that the people running Nazi concentration camps might have used to assuage any moral qualms about the gas-chambers (“they are already here, so best make the most of it”) and the brutality of the forced labour (as the inscription over Auschwitz says, “Arbeit macht Frei”). Or the US Air Force’s argument for bombing Laos after a treaty had been reached with Cambodia (“it would be a waste to have all those planes sitting idle; if we can no longer bomb Cambodia, we just bomb some other country nearby”).

How about not having driverless cars? Despite all the testing, it seems they are still incapable of managing urban areas safely. All this “always on” so-called “smart” technology is destroying society’s mental health. Present bandwidth is perfectly adequate, provided that the codebase is efficient. Too many websites take ages to load due to bad coding (i.e.: superfluous animation; circular arguments).

5G is a dangerous technology in that its enormous bandwidth would enable the gathering of enormous quantities of data, without consideration for whether such data *should* be gathered. It is bad in its own right, irrespective of whether it is the Americans or the Chinese who are developing it. The last few years have exposed the serious problems that are already arising from data collection on such an order of magnitude (fortunately, I never signed up to social media, so I am not as badly compromised as the people who dismissed my reasons as conspiracy theories). Do we never learn?

lundiel
lundiel
Feb 20, 2020 4:30 PM
Reply to  anon

See your psychiatrist fast. You’re having a psychotic episode.

lundiel
lundiel
Feb 20, 2020 4:37 PM
Reply to  lundiel

PS. You’ve addressed your own concerns by not subscribing to social media.
You can’t wind back technology unless we lose the knowledge and ability to produce it, for example, in a post apocalyptic world.

wardropper
wardropper
Feb 21, 2020 8:02 PM
Reply to  lundiel

It isn’t the technology that’s the problem. It’s the human beings deciding to let technology rule their lives. But there are a few who don’t, and in fact such people DO wind back technology and do what they can to live human lives in spite of current media and government propaganda.

Tim Jenkins
Tim Jenkins
Feb 22, 2020 2:06 PM
Reply to  lundiel

Bit like NASA losing the knowledge of how to land on the moon, you mean ?
& Transmit coverage.

Does China ‘own’ the ‘Dark Side of the Moon, or Pink Floyd ?

When does knowledge & creative thought become intellectual property,
patent or copyright >>> that ole’ light bulb moment, (eh 🙂 ) ? ! Such jokers, when with collective knowledge, ‘We’ were using radio-waves, communicating with one another, long before any licensing system was ever created, >>> then came capitalism <<<.
We 'woz' robbed . . . wave by wave, by the likes of the BBC !
Considering Nikola Tesla . . .
Free to communicate ? good god, lundiel, we cannot have that 😉
imagine the devastation on the dark side of propaganda . . .
those in control would lose control.

Fair dinkum
Fair dinkum
Feb 19, 2020 11:28 PM

Should we feel sorry for the grovelling sycophants in Canberra,
torn between two masters/lovers ?
In a great big Shit Pie of their own making ?
No.
Let em eat shit.

Portonchok
Portonchok
Feb 19, 2020 9:36 PM

I personally will not trust the technology of either of these two empires.

IANA
IANA
Feb 19, 2020 9:22 PM

This is one of those puzzling moments when the sum of the parts of the argument simply don’t add up.

It was largely the US who by outsourcing there manufacturing and labour costs to China that have put China in the position of being able to develop 5G technology. How many US companies have been working and developing with the Chinese to get them to this level.

And yet although there is obviously a symbiotic relationship between American and Chinese business interests no doubt with the full support of various US administrations we are supposed to believe that on the one hand ‘China is our partner’ while on the other they are a danger to western interests and security.

The logic of that doesn’t add up. If the CCP were / are such a danger why did the American’s allow there companies to invest so much there that they have created the problems they now say China presents? Has a very Hegelian feel to it…

Wilmers31
Wilmers31
Feb 20, 2020 1:55 AM
Reply to  IANA

“It was largely the US who by outsourcing ….”

What you see is a non-unity between the corporations who outsourced and government requirements to separate from a future potential enemy in war. When the companies outsourced 15/20 years ago they saw China as the huge market that they could sell US products to. It was never planned for the boot to be on the other foot, every company just made their own little decision but voila – here we are.

They also assumed that China would privatize everything. Rob Kapito’s ’50 idle trillions’ look like a war chest to take over China.

So now they try to weaken China and Russia through sanctions, bans, boycotts, and tariffs. At the same time they engage in propaganda (Murdoch’s media are shocking) with the war propaganda being against China (in Australia) while in Europe the war propaganda is against Russia. It did not make a difference to me who stole our land, East Germany for a while according to their laws and then the Kohl-Regime in the West breaching constitution and human rights. The West is no better in any way.

Maggie
Maggie
Feb 20, 2020 7:45 AM
Reply to  Wilmers31

Well said Willmers..

Chris
Chris
Feb 19, 2020 8:50 PM

Over the last couple of decades, Oz governments have become increasingly rabid and more partisan to the US, they have now got to the point where they are just another satellite. So when the UK goes to talk with the Australians they are basically just talking to the US.
GCHQ, much as I dislike some of their activities, are leaders in their field and quite capable of determining how much of a risk , or not, Huawei (and others) present to UK security. I think at least some of the ire from the US is as much the fact that Britain is buying Chinese comms and not US made kit as of course, US National Security these days is commanding every market.

Richard Le Sarc
Richard Le Sarc
Feb 20, 2020 7:30 AM
Reply to  Chris

Australia has been a satellite of the USA since WW2, and England before that. After the CIA ousted Whitlam. in ’75, the position became ever more abject and contemptible.

Richard Le Sarc
Richard Le Sarc
Feb 19, 2020 8:31 PM

The rabid, raving, Sinophobe stooge of the USA, Byrne, is an ALP (Another Liberal Party)rat, typical of the murine vermin that infest the corpse of the ‘social democratic’ party, now avid coal-miners, and competing with the Liberals to be the most groveling boot-lickers to our Yankee Masters. This is no long a country, but a fully controlled metastasis of the Imperial cancer in Washington D.C.

tonyopmoc
tonyopmoc
Feb 19, 2020 5:18 PM

I used to work on mobile data comms in 1995. Before then it was analogue. Obviously mobile data comms have improved dramatically since then, and 4G can be very fast, and carry tremendous volume, depending on your proximity to a mobile phone transmission tower. Wi-Fi works reasonably well too, but if you have more than a few devices in a close space, you are not going to get good performance, because they will clash with each other. You simply cannot beat cable connectivity if you want relaibilty and large volume throughput.

5G is not going to fix any of this, and it may well due to the frequencies and proximities, be almost as dangerous, as sticking your head in a microwave oven.

I certainly do not want a 5G antenna on the lampost outside my bedroom window, and I seriously dislike being picked out to go through a full body scanner at an airport, and there is no way, I would want even a 4G tower in the playground where my Grandkids go to school.

These microwaves are not completely harmless. Some people seem to be very susceptible to them. If you do not believe me, then peer in to your 20 year old (leaky?) microwave oven whilst seeing what it does to your potato in 10 minutes, using not heat, but microwaves. Do it too many times, then I think it highly likely your eyesight may be badly affected.

People tend to trust these things as safe, until, they can no longer see, that’s if they don’t get cancer from them in the meantime.

Cables are much safer and quicker.

I am not paranoid about such microwave radiation, or even sunlight in the visible spectrum, but too much of anything is not good for you, and we simply do not need 5G.

We need more cables, especially in rural areas if you want to communicate. It is not that hard. Most people receive electricity and piped water, even half way up a mountain in Scotland. Both could be used for data and voice transmission as well.

Tony

Mike Ellwood
Mike Ellwood
Feb 19, 2020 6:02 PM
Reply to  tonyopmoc

I refuse to own or use a microwave oven. Worrying if 5G is almost as bad. Ian R Crane is always talking on Youtube about this stuff. Not sure how seriously to take him, but I wouldn’t automatically accept official assurances of its safety.

Gall
Gall
Feb 19, 2020 9:22 PM
Reply to  Mike Ellwood

Yeah we tossed that puppy out. Of course that was after the Radon Tube broke but hey better late than never. Haven’t bought one since.

Robbobbobin
Robbobbobin
Feb 19, 2020 9:29 PM
Reply to  Mike Ellwood

‘I wouldn’t automatically accept official assurances of [5G’]s safety.’

There are no official assurances of 5G’s safety. No-one had ever checked it out properly before the deployment go-aheads were given. Check the Congressional record, where some asked it’s promoters directly and got back only a bunch of foot shuffling and blank looks.

Mucho
Mucho
Feb 19, 2020 9:54 PM
Reply to  Mike Ellwood

One highly qualified and respected expert on the health effects of wireless tech like wifi and 5G (which will use highly nefarious millimeter waves) and microwaves, is Barrie Trower, former Royal Navy microwave weapons expert. His credentials are extensive, he has worked in microwaves for the forces since the 70s, is highly educated in physics and related subjects and even wrote a paper for the Police on their Tetra system. Plenty of him on Youtube to choose from. He is very concerned about the rollout of these technologies

In this clip, he explains one the most sinister effects of wifi, which will not be seen for maybe two generations, because the microwaves being used in school wifi and by kids will cause irreversible damage to the genetic material in the eggs of young girls, which will mainly be seen in their children and their children thereafter. There has been an unbroken chain of unchanged, good genetic material being passed through the generations which can be traced back to the very first humans in Africa, but all that is being undone forever, as we speak, because of the proliferation of wifi

Wifi, Microwaves and the Consequences to our Health – Barrie Trower

Richard Le Sarc
Richard Le Sarc
Feb 20, 2020 7:32 AM
Reply to  Mucho

I believe that some creches and schools in Europe are doing away with Wifi, and hard-wiring their equipment.

Mucho
Mucho
Feb 20, 2020 2:09 PM

From a quick google search.

“What do France, Belgium, Israel, Spain, Australia and Italy all have in common? They have all taken action on removing or reducing WiFi (or cellphone) use in schools. Take France for example, they passed a law in 2015 banning WiFi from all nursery schools. In addition to that, the law states that WiFi must be turned off in all elementary schools when it’s not in use.”

This is not “News” to the authorities, that wifi and mircowaves are harmful. They understand the effects very well, that’s where your trillions of military spending goes, to work out ways to harm people. They’ve done their old trick of betting on the supposition that the public will assume that the authorities are looking out for them, that things have been tested and that everything is safe. The opposite is actually true, militaries worldwide have been using microwaves and millimeter waves in weaponry for decades and they know full well what the health effects of all this shite are.
When the public allows events like 9/11 and 7/7 to go ahead with zero scrutiny, when they allow the Nazis to take over and when they consistently shut down those who try to alert them to this problem, this is what happens. This is what happens when the Nazis take over.
It’s interesting that in Satan’s lair, the UK, they really couldn’t give a fuck about the children and are going all out to achieve maximum wifi exposure everywhere they go. On buses, in pubs, in libraries, in cafes, in schools. Do private schools have wifi everywhere, as a rule, I wonder?…….I saw a mobile phone tower right next to a major hospital just recently. Charming! Senior management promotions for whoever signed that one off. Phone masts are the biggest emitters of these harmful, man-made, pulsed microwaves.
The total lowlife that is Boris Johnson has been proudly announcing the delivery of “gigabit broadband”, which is actually just a weapons system to be used against the population. That’s gonna be your present from the Tories, kids, your new 5G network, millimeter wave exposure 24/7. How wonderful. England must be so happy with its choice to put its weight behind the Tories to fudge Brexit through and make the UK 100% in bed with the sinking ship that is the USA and also Israel, where 4G tech was developed and presumably 5G as well. This just as the EU announces plans to detach from the US. I’ll believe that when I see it, but I know which direction I would rather travel in.
The BBC were running a newsflash on the radio recently stating that more than 50% of minors in the UK not only have mobile phones, but they also sleep with them under their pillow and right next to them, switched on at night. The BBC could have used this as an opportunity to warn of the dire health consequences in doing this, that this is not good for children to do this, but they didn’t, because the BBC is a tool of the Devil which actually delights in spreading these lies and hiding this information from the public. Brits luuuurrrrrvvve their BBC.
As if that’s not enough, in Naziland, they are also installing blue light emitting, LED lights in eye hospitals and in hospital car parks! Presumably in the buildings as well. These lights actually CAUSE blindness. I went in to try to tell the staff at an eye hospital about this, that their new lighting system causes blindness, but the guy I spoke to was a total prick and wouldn’t listen. It was everything I expect from this nation of idiots. But never mind, the stupid people of Naziland are lapping it up, keeping their kids safe with their smartphones.
The way out of all this? Stop paying your phone bills. Boycott the wireless industry. It’s the only way, and it is totally peaceful.

milosevic
milosevic
Feb 20, 2020 2:30 PM
Reply to  Mucho

next time, try flavouring your disinfo with some references.

Gall
Gall
Feb 19, 2020 9:20 PM
Reply to  tonyopmoc

I agree with every word you’ve written here. I think this whole hissy fit misses the point entirely and that is the question of whether 5G is safe?

What I’d like to add is that no one really knows the possible dangers of exposing the public to 5G. Robert David Steel makes a valid point over at Veterans Today that many of the flue symptoms assigned to the Coronavirus could possibly be due to radiation exposure:

https://www.veteranstoday.com/2020/02/18/who-objects-to-robert-steeles-saying-its-radiation-sickness-not-a-virus/

Interesting that the flue started in China after they started installing 5G Networks in places like Wuhan for example.

Of course anyone saying such a thing would be labeled a “conspiracy theorist” and would be considered a hinderance to the march of progress that has given us such cool and groovy shit like Nuclear Weapons and Reactors that leak like sieves, fracking, strip mining, self driving cars that run over pedestrians, exploding cell phones and massive quantities of pharmaceuticals that keep the public dazed and confused while the greedy kleptocrats steal everything that isn’t nailed down.

I’m sure eventually the FDA will claim that 5G is “safe and effective” and we can all rest easy after taking our proscribed Prozac of course and lulled back into a stupor watching “America’s Got Talent” or whatever.

Mucho
Mucho
Feb 19, 2020 11:57 PM
Reply to  Gall

The health effects of millimeter waves and therefore 5G have been known since the 70s:

“Morphological, functional and biochemical studies conducted in humans and animals revealed that millimeter waves caused changes in the body manifested in structural alterations in the skin and internal organs, qualitative and quantitive changes in the blood and bone marrow composition and changes of the conditioned reflex activity, tissue respiration, activity of enzymes participating in the processs of tissue respiration and nucleic metabolism. The degree of unfavourable effect of millimeter waves depended on the duration of the radiation and individual characteristics of the organism.”

“They know what this stuff does, that’s why they’re doing it.” The Fullerton Informer

Health effects quote taken from this official CIA document, a translation of Soviet research in to millimeter waves and nonionizing radiation. Page 57 of pdf doc
https://thefullertoninformer.com/5gdangers-com/

Mucho
Mucho
Feb 20, 2020 12:00 AM
Reply to  Mucho

Definitive confirmation y the industry that they have done zero health testing of this tech, prior to rolling out 5G

US Senator Blumenthal Raises Concerns on 5G Wireless Technology Health Risks at Senate Hearing

Gall
Gall
Feb 20, 2020 1:24 AM
Reply to  Mucho

Exactly but you know that if the truth interferes with profits that the truth is usually deep 6ed.

Tim Jenkins
Tim Jenkins
Feb 22, 2020 4:13 PM
Reply to  Gall

Gall might like to verify for himself the home city of the best latest micro-processor chip, the most economical quality Chip maker & market breaker & Huawei most favoured competition for Intel inside Israel, today …

Yangtze Chips, based in Wuhan, continue daily operations, unhindered,
under sterile circumstances, as per usual. In a nutshell, No worries there :), nor for the free movement of their employees, Comms. D’Key to any knowledge & distributing same.

The Chinese could revolutionise the internet, tomorrow, if they so wished, destroying many businesses & nations in which they’ve interests …
The Photon internet, with Quantum Random Encryption inbuilt >>> unbreakable, Exists already, both from Space & 1,200 Km overland Antenna2Antenna, Military grade already tried & tested, a military advantage that will render fibre optic cable redundant in the long run in many places, cable way too expensive to construct the old infrastructure, when scrambling Photons.
The queen’s coronation & home Tv. was a ‘Psyop’ with lab rats being joe public, but this internet ‘Psyop’ thingy is a whole other dimension in terms of mind control & personalisation of messaging same Joe & Jan Public … data being key to programming A.i. & ‘inserting’ an Artificial ‘id’ iAmin’s dream Ugandan Utopia of Ubuntu WaffenSS, Waffen Soros Styling, with a few of his old in tooth pals, like ChenHallMorg’nMurdochRothRock & Co. … Data speaks louder, life, so simple . . . 😉 You can have the biggest army with boats & drones, but if you can’t communicate with any of them, coz’ of jamming or because of an EMP or various other potential electronic blackouts, real line of sight is lost immediately and line of sight & vision into the future is where & when empires fail,
trying to control simply,
too much … — …
Freedom to Communicate ?
Ask Julian Assange . . .
“Look over thur’, wake d’fukupAaaarghButtKnotsRecusalReluctance…”
Pure Double Standards, in legal terms a binding matter,
when programming A.i. !!
See the conflict ?
I trust Ren’s judgement, as engineer …

Rhys Jaggar
Rhys Jaggar
Feb 19, 2020 4:58 PM

I can speak with utter confidence that none of my computer-based work has ever been safe from US hands and I have never given any US entity permission to hack me.

Nothing China can do to me has not already been done by the USA, so all this hoity toity self-righteous crap is just that: CRAP!

Peter Charles
Peter Charles
Feb 19, 2020 5:57 PM
Reply to  Rhys Jaggar

Quite so. This has little to do with security, I am sure that Google makes a great deal more use of what data it drags from every android or google services user than the Chinese ever would. Does it really matter if the Chinese can monitor my phone calls etc? No, I would be much more worried about what GCHQ was doing in that regard. As to back doors in hardware, well every Western chip manufacturer has them and has passed their full specifications to the CIA et al as we know from various leaks/whistle-blowers.

That said, I suppose there is the possibility the Chinese could remotely crash our communications or do other unspecified but potentially hazardous things which is a reasonable argument not to allow foreign powers to install critical infrastructure, be it communications, energy generation, water treatment or whatever. I mean would we seriously allow Chinese companies to build nuclear power stations over here, or allow trans-national companies to provide our energy generation? /sarc

No, what we have here is two things, one the Chinese are ahead of the West in this area and would gain a huge competitive advantage from the start and secondly it could actually compromise our own security services spying on us.

tonyopmoc
tonyopmoc
Feb 19, 2020 7:40 PM
Reply to  Peter Charles

Peter Charles, Whilst I have never been to China, at least 3 of our childrens friends have lived and worked there for the last 10 years, and occasionally come back for a visit at Christmas. I have never had a problem with Chinese people, and neither has my wife. They often come to our local park, in the late autumn, and go picking chestnuts. They tell my wife, which are the safest, nicest ones to eat. I just played conkers with them, when I was a kid. Never even thought about eating them. We didn’t mind, cos we have no deer in our park.

I don’t mind people with the correct skills, culling deer – except anyone who works for The Guardian, who once invited me to meet him at a festival in Wales and I nearly did.

I like a bit of venison, but I can’t stand the hypocrisy. I would be amazed if he can shoot straight, but suspect he really enjoyed the kill.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/feb/19/wildlife-killing-deer-diversity-resources-environment

Tony

Gall
Gall
Feb 19, 2020 9:27 PM
Reply to  Peter Charles

If China wanted to spy on us they wouldn’t use their own 5G networks they’d tap directly into the servers by splicing into the cables like the NSA does or even better they’d ask Google.

Haltonbrat
Haltonbrat
Feb 21, 2020 12:03 AM
Reply to  Peter Charles

It’s Israel we should be worrying out although that would make us antisemites.

Theo
Theo
Feb 19, 2020 4:55 PM

The US has spied out over 125 countries with the help of Crypto for decades. Snowden revealed that. The US forced telecomunication companies to leave back doors for their spooks all around the world. On Australia’s ABC was a long article about the dangers of the Chinese tik tok App. About spying and censoring and deleting unwanted comments. But what about Facebook and Twitter and Instagram?

Richard Le Sarc
Richard Le Sarc
Feb 19, 2020 8:35 PM
Reply to  Theo

The ABC has long been leading the campaign of Sinophobic hatred in this sorry excuse for a country. The report on TikTok was typically rabid, utterly biased, and without a hint of any counter-argument, what the stooge from ASPI (financed by Raytheon and Lockheed among others, and a sewer off Sinophobe hatred)called a ‘liberal democracy’, in action.

BigB
BigB
Feb 19, 2020 3:59 PM

When the recent head of the CIA – who prided himself that they lied, cheated, and stole – chides you that your citizens information may be vulnerable to China …that’s priceless!

Tim Jenkins
Tim Jenkins
Feb 22, 2020 4:19 PM
Reply to  BigB

“Broadsword calling Dannyboy…”

Pomp-Pot calling Kettle black red yellow, you name it, Pomp-Pot calling Kettle …
Cable & Wireless, Comms. = Knowledge, unless Photon Encrypted.
The Photon internet exists & working from space and
up to 1,200 Km Antenna to Antenna overland . . .
Slow down Huawei.

Project & Transfer ! in every sense,
forget “Parallel Platforms”
Intel inside Israel
& missing $$$Trillions$$$
& WTC7 Demolition
& its’ Contents…
& Weather Modification
& Derivative Speculation
& Lockheed Martin’s Chinese Olympic Weather-cocktail
& 500 installations, on the Himalayas
& Monsanto/Bayer
& Enron unfortunates
& US Farmers
& Meng Wangzhou CFO Deputy Chair,
& Ren’s Daughter ! ??
& What’s the weather like today ?
& What did the Yanks ever do for us,
except lease fiction to the BBC, from the ‘Getgo’, from 1945 onwards & pay the Dalai Lama’s personal CIA wages, which were $180,000 p.a. from 1945 -1974, officially stopped by Nixon.
Imagine China holding Ms. Lynn Rothschild . . . or Rebekah Mercer !
No damn difference ! That’s priceless . . . a priceless disgrace.
Arrest bosses daughters ? Speaking of renditions >>> “Ivanka looks tasty . . . ” 🙂
Effin’ Soap, innit’, takin’ the proverbial & the Chinese
Bordering on a corporate royal Coronation of Corruption Kowtowers (C.O.C.K.s for short …)
A crowning disgrace,
from Neo-Pompeus ‘liberators’ & Media Matters, murdoch&soros
Monarchists are masochists, with sadistic touch …

Best wishes,
Tim 🙂

paul
paul
Feb 19, 2020 3:47 PM

You can buy Huawei equipment, which is good value, good quality, but which MAY be spying on you.

Or you can buy US equipment, which is expensive crap, and which DEFINITELY IS spying on you.

Mike Ellwood
Mike Ellwood
Feb 19, 2020 6:12 PM
Reply to  paul

Quite happy so far with my Huawei phone. (Good evening Comrade Xi. That’ll be beef with mushrooms for me; sweet and sour pork for the missus. Ta). (Satire, not racism).

lundiel
lundiel
Feb 19, 2020 6:37 PM
Reply to  Mike Ellwood

And I love my Xiaomi phone, wireless charger, laptop and activity band.

Richard Le Sarc
Richard Le Sarc
Feb 19, 2020 8:39 PM
Reply to  lundiel

Part of the motivation for the Sinophobe hate campaign is RAGE that an inferior type, the ‘mere Asiatics’, are far outdoing the Chosen People of the West in science and technology. The Western ‘Gods Upon the Earth’ rather than compete on their merits, or even collaborate for mutual benefit, resort, as ever, to bullying, threats, sabotage and, inevitably, violence.

paul
paul
Feb 22, 2020 8:25 PM
Reply to  lundiel

Never had any mobile phone, and I love that.

Tim Jenkins
Tim Jenkins
Feb 19, 2020 8:57 PM
Reply to  Mike Ellwood

So,Satay sauce ?

Richard Le Sarc
Richard Le Sarc
Feb 19, 2020 8:36 PM
Reply to  paul

Has there EVER been any concrete proof of Huawei ‘spying’ been produced anywhere?

Gall
Gall
Feb 19, 2020 9:30 PM
Reply to  paul

You forget that most of our equipment is actually “Made in China” with the exception of maybe the cables.

Haltonbrat
Haltonbrat
Feb 21, 2020 9:34 AM
Reply to  paul

US equipment with Israeli implants.

lundiel
lundiel
Feb 19, 2020 3:02 PM

All good news as far as I’m concerned.