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Nelson: The leader who puts current British leaders to shame

Gloria Moss

Today, Wednesday 21st of October, sees the 215th anniversary of the Battle that gave Trafalgar Square its name. Towering over this is the statue of Admiral Nelson, looking towards Parliament and beyond that to the open seas. His victory over the French and Spanish gave the British Navy supremacy of the seas for nearly a century, allowing them to police the world’s oceans and stop the transport of slaves.

Recently the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich has announced a review of the ‘heroic status’ of Nelson, a move prompted by suggestions of his complicity in the slave trade. In reality, a letter of Nelson purportedly supporting slavery is most likely a forgery and claims that he used his seat in Parliament to vigorously defend the slave trade is contradicted by his silence on this subject during his appearances in Parliament.

So, perhaps the Museum could use the anniversary of Trafalgar to spearhead a re-evaluation of Nelson, based on his leadership skills? We cover some of that territory here, taking a look at his man-management skills, relating them to his achievements and to modern management theory and comparing them to the skills of those directing the coronavirus crisis in Britain.

Nelson’s superb leadership

According to Andrew Lambert, Laughton Professor of Naval History in the Department of War Studies, King’s College London, Nelson was ‘an admiral of genius who inspired those under his command with a sense of fellowship, of shared endeavour and of national pride’. Nelson learned his trade from the bottom up, joining the Royal Navy at the age of 12 and passing his lieutenant’s exam at under the official age.

His genius?

In addition to a talent in unconventional battle strategy, Nelson provided inspirational leadership by putting himself on the front line and leading by example (for example, at the Battle of St Vincent 1797 and at Trafalgar); he would share his battle plans with his captains, providing intellectual stimulation and listening to their criticisms; he would have dinner with his captains, showing individualised consideration and getting to know them as individuals strengths and weaknesses; he showed stewardship in being prepared to defy orders and face the risk of a court martial if he felt that his solution would safeguard the lives of his men and the country (for example at the Battle of Copenhagen in 1801).

After Nelson was shot at Trafalgar, his final words were ‘Now I am satisfied. Thank God I have done my duty’.

The effect?

As he wrote in a letter to Lord Howe following the battle of the Nile in 1798, he had ‘the happiness to command a ‘band of brothers’ (Jan 1799 he even once described his captains as ‘my darling children’ and as ‘noble-minded friends and comrades, a gallant set of fellows’. He even wrote how his ‘heart swells at the thought of them’ and this last comment betrays the strong feelings and empathy that bound him to them.

This strong bond produced inspirational motivation and unshakable loyalty. So, at Cadiz in 1797, Nelson’s coxswain, Sykes, saved the admiral’s life by placing himself between Nelson and the enemy cutlasse. Then, following Nelson’s resounding victory at the battle of the Nile (1798), the surviving captains commissioned a sword and a portrait of Nelson as ‘proof of their esteem’ for his ‘prompt decision and intrepid conduct’.

In return, Nelson proclaimed the conduct of every officer to be ‘equal’, awarding Naval Gold medals to all. The creator of the modern-day ‘Equity theory’ (Adams, 1963) would have been proud of him.

Note also that by involving and empowering his captains, Nelson encouraged the use of initiative; and his message that captains who engaged the enemy could not go far wrong grew their confidence.

Ahead of his time: inclusive leader

We have seen how Admiral Nelson used at least eight leadership attributes – listening, idealised leadership, inspirational motivation, intellectual stimulation, individualised consideration, empathy, growing the confidence of others and stewardship. These are in fact eight of the fifteen competencies that can underpin the style of leadership known today as ‘Inclusive Leadership’.

In fact, the use of around eight competencies is typical of many of the organisations profiled in my book Inclusive Leadership (2019) and, in all cases, the effects were extremely positive. This type of leadership was associated with higher productivity, higher motivation and greater well-being than was found with authoritarian managers.

Note that a very wide range of organisations fed into these results. In industry, they emerged from a study funded by the Employers Network on Equality and Inclusion (enei) involving just under 1000 employees from eleven organisations including EY, Santander, Sodexo, Network Rail and the NHS. In the world of Higher Education (a sector typified by remote and authoritarian senior managers) they held true of students in a British and in a Norwegian university. And in the world of schools, a study at a top British independent school, Sevenoaks, revealed similar benefits to maths pupils taught by teachers with an inclusive style of leadership.

So Nelson was way ahead of his times in using Inclusive leadership and, as we have seen, with winning results. What of our government? Are they also following in the tradition established by Nelson and exemplified by some of Britain’s best organisations? The best way to judge this is by looking at the same eight attributes that Nelson practised so superbly.

The government’s handling of the Covid crisis

We can start with listening. The government has in fact been accused of failing to listen to 7000 scientists and doctors who have signed the Barrington Declaration, an initiative spearheaded by doctors at Harvard, Stanford and Oxford Universities.

This proposes that young, healthy and low-risk people should be permitted to go about their lives as normal, while “focused protection” is offered to the elderly and those with underlying medical conditions – the groups most at risk from COVID-19. 

Then, in terms of stewardship, many have said that the British government is failing to safeguard the financial and health interests of British citizens. It stands accused of blindly following the predictions of Neil Ferguson which, some say, were based on a flawed computer model. Indeed, some ask why they would heed the views of a man whose 2002 predictions about “Mad Cow Disease” (he foretold 50,000 deaths) were proved wide of the mark after only a little more than 200 people died.

Where idealised influence is concerned, government personnel in Britain have left a lot to be desired. From talk of officials breaking the lockdown (remember that trip by Dominic Cummings to Durham County?) to rumours of Matt Hancock drinking in a Commons bar past the 10pm curfew. As for individualised consideration, we can probably think of all too many arrests that show complete disregard for this.

What of intellectual stimulation? Many of those in the Cabinet had privileged educations but the sight of Matt Hancock floundering under the questioning of Talk Radio’s Julia Hartley-Brewer (see this video in which she asks about the 90-100% of positive tests which may be false) is hardly uplifting. Neither does it give confidence – any more than the epidemic of legal cases which implicate MPs in fraud. Then of course at a human level, many have commented on the absence of empathy (along with scientific rigour) in government guidelines since many prevent family and friends from visiting loved ones, in hospitals and care homes.

The lessons of Nelson

One of Britain’s greatest leaders towers above Trafalgar Square. He took Britain to unparalleled heights using a form of leadership that is inclusive rather than exclusive of those under his control.

This appears to be in short supply in government ranks and we can only hope that the lesson of Nelson – facing down to the Houses of Parliament – can shift the authoritarian stance of those directing the current crisis.

Gloria Moss PhD FCIPD is the author of six books including Inclusive Leadership (Routledge, 2019). She has a background as a Training Manager in blue chip companies and as a Professor of Management and Marketing. She will be speaking at the ‘Questioning History’ conference on December 18th-20th, not far from London. This conference will delve into official history and the extent to which it delivers us a false rather than true version of events (details here).

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Orage
Orage
Oct 25, 2020 2:50 PM

Admin
Will you check the spam folder where my comment, which was not spam, disappeared?

LIFE IS NOT ALLOWED
LIFE IS NOT ALLOWED
Oct 24, 2020 2:47 AM

Nationalistic boot licking drivel ! Death to Britannia and all imperialism!

Please take this shite off here if you don’t want to be associated with the far right.

The “far right” being those who pine for the good old days of imperialism, feudalism and monarchy. The perpetrators of which also happened to be whites preying on darker skins…

David Eire
David Eire
Oct 23, 2020 1:51 PM

Nelsons Farewell
Poor old Admiral Nelson is no longer in the air
Toora loora loora loora loo
On the eighth day of March in Dublin City fair
Toora loora loora loora loo
At one thirty in the morning without a bit of warning
Nelson took a powder and he blew
At last the Irish nation has Parnell in higher station
Goodbye Admiral Nelson toora loo

DunGroanin
DunGroanin
Oct 23, 2020 11:41 AM

‘Turning a blind eye’

Is the only thing Nelson has passed into English perfidious nature when dealing with the rest of humanity as inferior.

And kissing his midshipmen
😙😙

Doctortrinate
Doctortrinate
Oct 23, 2020 1:30 AM

Shot in full plume…when a covert display would have made a less cocksure target for the redoubtable french peacock..was Nelson resovled to die that day ?….”look after emma”.And then, over a century later, after a hike of around 1600 miles, and only 12 miles from the One Ton supply depot, Scott and others all, gave in to the elements….”look after our people”. Ill-fated, or was it something other ?

JuraCalling
JuraCalling
Oct 22, 2020 6:50 PM

Politics and war may well be related, but are still two very distinct arenas. It’s like comparing Opera and Woodstock. I think the author is naive.

It’s fair to say Nelson had qualities that no doubt drove his success. He was a leader of men, he could inspire them and he earned their undying trust. On top of these qualities, he was a master of strategy in the watery battlefields that helped maintain Britain’s power . Whoever ruled the waves ruled the world- in theory. Does that mean such a man would be as inspiring in the battlefield of politics where most battles are fought by stealth and covert means ?

Nelson’s brilliance worked for him in the context of warfare. A weak leader or poor strategist would have led his fleet to certain death with one wrong decision. You only get one shot.

In parliament you get several. One, or many, bad decisions, lies or mistakes don’t necessarily end your career and never your life and the lives of your party members.

In war Nelson needed an understanding of the size of his fleet and that of the enemy, the weather, the time that travelling would take to go to war and return and the other logistics such as his arsenal and supplies. That’s it.

In politics he would need the skills to negotiate with other leaders. He’d need men who could protect and grow an economy. He’d need to inspire a fleet that was comprised of the population of a whole nation. So many areas in which he had never been schooled.

If he was leading Britain today through this Corona Crisis what would he do ? Where would his man management skills come into play ? Would his inspirational leadership in war prove to be a transferable skill ? Of course not. How many state leaders have you seen dressed in military garb who could persuade anyone of anything without stirring up hatred and anger elsewhere ?

Nelson would be told about the coronavirus game. Rule by rule. He would be told to :- ”Leave the ‘sciencey stuff’ to the ‘sciencey’ folk and read it to the media later”. After all, we couldn’t blame him for misunderstanding medicine or science could we- he’d be a politician.

He’d also be told ( behind closed doors of his masonic lodge, Fabian society tea dance or Bilderberg meeting) the truth behind the narrative and the long term aim. He’d be reminded that battles will be won or lost but the war will be their ( not our) final victory ( solution).

His skills would be tested with regard to his mastery of prestidigitation. His integrity would have to be discarded as a preferred personality trait. There’s no room for integrity in politics. And, above all, when the enemy was named as ‘ the people’ he’d have to think on his feet and decide if he could sell out or not.

If Nelson was around today, he’d be ashamed to be British. He’d be ashamed of all the death and carnage he witnessed throughout the battles fought for a country that was always going to disregard the right to life enjoyed by it’s people. He’d feel that he’d been betrayed by the crown and that he’d unwittingly betrayed the people and his own values. And, if he had any understanding of psychological warfare, he’d know exactly what was going on right now and want no part of it other than to fight against it- not for it.

Mr Y
Mr Y
Oct 22, 2020 1:55 PM

“His victory over the French and Spanish gave the British Navy supremacy of the seas for nearly a century, allowing them to police the world’s oceans and stop the transport of slaves.”

Police?!

messenger charles
messenger charles
Oct 22, 2020 4:54 PM
Reply to  Mr Y

Oh yes, Messrs Rothschild needed lots of police to guard their Empire.

JuraCalling
JuraCalling
Oct 22, 2020 7:59 PM

I think ‘police’ was being used as a verb 🤔

messenger charles
messenger charles
Oct 23, 2020 11:14 AM
Reply to  JuraCalling

I fail to see your point. The US navy and military (policemen) now does the Rothschild’s policing.

tiredofthelies
tiredofthelies
Oct 22, 2020 8:06 PM
Reply to  Mr Y

Britain was the LAST nation to make slavery illegal, and did so only when requested to do so by America.

tish
tish
Oct 25, 2020 6:02 PM
Reply to  tiredofthelies

Slavery is alive and well to this day in our ‘nation’ be it illegal or not..I guess the term ‘people trafficking’ does not sound as bad as slavery, but make no mistake about it young women from Eastern Europe came here to work in bone fide jobs and ended up locked up in houses of multiple occupency. They became sex slaves.They were sold into slavery by their fellow Country people.

paul
paul
Oct 23, 2020 4:46 AM
Reply to  Mr Y

Allowing them to loot/ enslave a quarter of the planet, rape China, commit genocide across much of the planet…………………

messenger charles
messenger charles
Oct 23, 2020 11:17 AM
Reply to  paul

Take more water with that Kool Aid.

LIFE IS NOT ALLOWED
LIFE IS NOT ALLOWED
Oct 24, 2020 2:56 AM

I have toilet paper printed wiith the union jack. would you like some?

messenger charles
messenger charles
Oct 25, 2020 5:32 PM

You should spend the money on an education not Union Jack toilet paper.

Paul Vonharnish
Paul Vonharnish
Oct 22, 2020 1:37 PM

Aren’t “leaders” something used on fishing lines?

“Captain Tac is where your Fishing Fun Starts. Customer Care is our First Priority.”
https://www.captaintac.com/

Researcher
Researcher
Oct 23, 2020 5:28 AM

Apparently they LOVE leaders here. British people need “leaders” to tell them to jump off a cliff. Get a shot in the arm with some nanotech. Clap for the NHS and other ridiculous acts of gullibility and fakery.

Personally, I don’t see the need for leaders. Or the need for governments, police, politicians, the “media”, militaries, NGOs, bombs, the security state, bankers or billionaires.

But don’t mention the banksters, 5g radiation weaponry or the fact there’s no virus.

That’s three topics that are completely verboten.

The 77th or whatever psychopaths are here under multiple identities and fake accounts don’t like it. At all.

Paul Vonharnish
Paul Vonharnish
Oct 23, 2020 2:15 PM
Reply to  Researcher

I’ve always been an anarchist with my own personal dictator… The strategy hasn’t worked out very well… You may find this 77th definition helpful: >

Excerpted from: Sovereign wealth fund – Wikipedia

“A sovereign wealth fund (SWF) or sovereign investment fund is a state-owned investment fund that invests in real and financial assets such as stocks, bonds, real estate, precious metals, or in alternative investments such as private equity fund or hedge funds. Sovereign wealth funds invest globally. Most SWFs are funded by revenues from commodity exports or from foreign-exchange reserves held by the central bank. By historic convention, the United States’ Social Security Trust Fund, with $2.8 trillion of assets in 2014, and similar vehicles like Japan Post Bank’s 200 trillion yen of holdings, are not considered sovereign wealth funds.

Some sovereign wealth funds may be held by a central bank, which accumulates the funds in the course of its management of a nation’s banking system; this type of fund is usually of major economic and fiscal importance. Other sovereign wealth funds are simply the state savings that are invested by various entities for the purposes of investment return, and that may not have a significant role in fiscal management.

The accumulated funds may have their origin in, or may represent, foreign currency deposits, gold, special drawing rights (SDRs) and International Monetary Fund (IMF) reserve positions held by central banks and monetary authorities, along with other national assets such as pension investments, oil funds, or other industrial and financial holdings. These are assets of the sovereign nations that are typically held in domestic and different reserve currencies (such as the dollar, euro, pound, and yen). Such investment management entities may be set up as official investment companies, state pension funds, or sovereign funds, among others.” [End quote]

Complete definition: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sovereign_wealth_fund

People complain about “fascists” then join in the fray…

Researcher
Researcher
Oct 23, 2020 3:12 PM

Thanks.

So the central banks (BIS and IMF) are seizing the wealth of every nation state that they actually originally stole from the people, along with all pensions, stocks, bonds, gold and silver reserves, commodities and social security coffers etc., then using those as collateral for the Special Drawing Rights for the new Digital Global Currency Reset, managed by the CIA, MI6, Mossad, FSB, CCP, etc., QintetiQ, SERCO, Google, Microsoft, Facebook and Amazon, plus the other thousand transnational corporations that are the members of the IMF’s new digital currency, so that all the people of the world will be forced to hand over all their assets and right to own property forever, and themselves for elimination voluntarily, or they cannot eat and therefore starve.

And if you don’t voluntarily hand yourself and your children’s rights over you’ll get sent to quarantine camp, where they will declare you insane, contagious or a terrorist and seize your assets anyway. Then, eliminate you.

“People complain about “fascists” then join in the fray…“

Yeah. No kidding. This is the biggest fascist move in world history. All achieved by stealth with the absolute knowledge and cooperation of all governments through the central banks, UN, media, NGOs, Organized Religion and Industry.

They colluded from the beginning. No blackmail necessary.

LIFE IS NOT ALLOWED
LIFE IS NOT ALLOWED
Oct 24, 2020 2:59 AM
Reply to  Researcher

unfortunately the 90 % need leaders to feel safe, like domesticated animals or many other primates..

Thom
Thom
Oct 22, 2020 8:40 AM

Johnson and co aren’t leaders in the first place. They are vassals of Washington, installed to wreck the country with Brexit and the coronavirus scam. Nothing will change unless the British people learn the lessons of Guy Fawkes.

David Mitchell
David Mitchell
Oct 22, 2020 10:55 AM
Reply to  Thom

The lesson of Guy Fawkes? You mean you wish to come under a Papal dictatorship?

Derf
Derf
Oct 22, 2020 4:44 PM
Reply to  David Mitchell

Well you learn something new all the time! wanting to kill the King and replace him with a Catholic ….. wonder how many people know that or forgotten it from school history?

JuraCalling
JuraCalling
Oct 22, 2020 8:08 PM
Reply to  Derf

Or, alternatively, the Protestants had motives for wanting to foment anti-Catholic sentiment throughout Britain and set Guy Fawkes right up.

Mister Fawkes, like many Catholics, thought it was unconstitutional to ban Catholics from politics. A bit like recent accusations of anti-semitism except real.

Catholics weren’t even allowed to travel a mile from their own home without permission. That’s oppressive. So Catholics were getting a little restless.

So the Houses Of Parliament blowing up and blaming Catholics was the chosen narrative to maintain the bad PR about them. Plus of course, old ‘Guido Fawkes’ had fought for the Spanish against Elizabeth. Bad form old chap.

He was found just standing around by a huge collection of gunpowder. Don’t you hate when you leave the house without your lighter..

martin
martin
Oct 24, 2020 2:55 AM
Reply to  JuraCalling

John Gerard ‘What Was The Gunpowder Plot? The traditional story tested by original evidence’

https://www.gutenberg.org/files/34807/34807-h/34807-h.htm

Mucho
Mucho
Oct 22, 2020 2:24 PM
Reply to  Thom

Bang on. This is sabotage. Brits have no idea. It’s all about destroying the country, then rebuilding it as a “designed in Israel”, “made in China” technocratic shitepit where liberty and freedom as we know are but a memory. It’s tragic. They are grinding evryone down, making life as uncomfortable as possible, then they will swoop in with the pre-determined solution – technocratic fascism, which will be pitched as the only/natural way out. The billboard adverts telling ballet dancers to retrain in cybersecurity says it all

JuraCalling
JuraCalling
Oct 22, 2020 8:02 PM
Reply to  Thom

Washington’s boss and Downing Street’s are vassals of Israel. Guy was a patsy ( never forget 5 /11 ) 😉

richard
richard
Oct 22, 2020 8:38 PM
Reply to  Thom

Now sit down THOM and I’ll explain it to you in words of one syllable (or so)

Covid – globalist

E.U. – globalist

Brexit – freedom

LIFE IS NOT ALLOWED
LIFE IS NOT ALLOWED
Oct 24, 2020 3:14 AM
Reply to  richard

the CIA will soon remind you that “freedom” comes at a rather high cost. in this case the cost is economic slavery, and being despised by most other nations. it will be perfect for the City’s mega money laundering racket.

James Robertson
James Robertson
Oct 22, 2020 7:22 AM

Nothing against Nelson but I have immense problems with “supremacy of the seas for nearly a century, allowing them to police the world’s oceans ”
Pretty sure they were transporting large amounts of opium during that time, seems dishonest of you to neglect that,
More importantly though, the idea they were the global cop upholding all that is just and right is a joke.
People like Nelson have heroic status conferred upon them in order to obscure the real nature of the imperial operation- anchored entirely in pillage and exploitation as it inevitably is.
These myths may seem harmless now that the British empire is a footnote in history, except the same rationale is used by the bastard son of that empire, the US to justify their own pillage and mass murder right across the world.
“The US didn’t destroy Iraq and Libya, they freed them!” Is the despicable refrain of the heirs of the empire Nelson helped build and sustain.
Great powers are never, ever beneficent and to suggest otherwise is a deplorable, infantile lie.

Steven Augustine
Steven Augustine
Oct 22, 2020 8:53 AM

“Nothing against Nelson but I have immense problems with “supremacy of the seas for nearly a century, allowing them to police the world’s oceans ”

Pretty sure they were transporting large amounts of opium during that time, seems dishonest of you to neglect that,

More importantly though, the idea they were the global cop upholding all that is just and right is a joke.”

Yeah. I’m still staring at the screen and slow-blinking over this. Now I need to read a “heroic” re-telling of the George Washington Story to make my day complete.

messenger charles
messenger charles
Oct 22, 2020 5:20 PM

By 1815 they were Rothschild’s navy, hence the Opium Trade.

John
John
Oct 22, 2020 7:19 AM

You have hit the nail on the head Gloria Moss.

There has been a systematic and sustained attack by the “Elite” against any leader that poses a threat to the ultimate objective. Global rule.

This is so blatant and one only has to look at who it it aimed at. A leader that is not a politician and cannot be bought and has principals and conviction.

He terrifies them and they are using every effort to get rid of him. That is Trump.

Unfortunately the UK is being controlled by a clandestine branch of the “Elite” Johnson is the chief clown and puppet of the circus. One only has to remember how he withered when he was subjected to the fear mongering of the corona circus. He changes tack completely. He was bought. He simply capitulated under pressure.

The closest UK ever came to another Nelson was Churchill. He became very powerful and a threat to the establishment so he was spat out after he had served the purpose.

A very inconvenient and unpalatable truth.

THX-1143
THX-1143
Oct 22, 2020 9:24 AM
Reply to  John

To put things in plain language, during the years leading up to the Second World War, both Churchill and numerous other fellow British MPs were regularly receiving sizable financial stipends—cash bribes—from Jewish and Czech sources in exchange for promoting a policy of extreme hostility toward the German government and actually advocating war. The sums involved were quite considerable, with the Czech government alone probably making payments that amounted to tens of millions of dollars in present-day money to British elected officials, publishers, and journalists working to overturn the official peace policy of their existing government. A particularly notable instance occurred in early 1938 when Churchill suddenly lost all his accumulated wealth in a foolish gamble on the American stock-market, and was soon forced to put his beloved country estate up for sale to avoid personal bankruptcy, only to quickly be bailed out by a foreign Jewish millionaire intent upon promoting a war against Germany. Indeed, the early stages of Churchill’s involvement in this sordid behavior are recounted in an Irving chapter aptly entitled “The Hired Help.”

Ironically enough, German Intelligence learned of this massive bribery of British parliamentarians, and passed the information along to Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, who was horrified to discover the corrupt motives of his fierce political opponents, but apparently remained too much of a gentlemen to have them arrested and prosecuted. I’m no expert in the British laws of that era, but for elected officials to do the bidding of foreigners on matters of war and peace in exchange for huge secret payments seems almost a textbook example of treason to me, and I think that Churchill’s timely execution would surely have saved tens of millions of lives.

Ron Unz — Understanding World War II

Geoff
Geoff
Oct 22, 2020 2:44 PM
Reply to  THX-1143

He was nothing more than a drunken bum .

John
John
Oct 22, 2020 4:19 PM
Reply to  THX-1143

Thanks for the info.

Looks like history being repeated. Johnson is captured too. . Maybe he “Churchill” wasn’t a Nelson after all.

I am aware he knew about the issue.
Winston Churchill admitted the existence of conspiracy when he wrote in 1920, “From the days of Spartacus-Weishaupt to those of Karl Marx, to those of Trotsky, Bela Kun, Rosa Luxemburg, and Emma Goldman, this worldwide conspiracy for the overthrow of civilization . . . has been steadily growing.”

Ludwig von Mises wrote about him in his book The Middle of the Road Leads to Socialism which surprised me  “It is noteworthy to remember that British socialism was not an achievement of Mr. Attlee’s Labor Government, but of the war cabinet of Mr. Winston Churchill.”

I wonder if Neville Chamberlain was not given a warning by the crown to butt out? If he had some morals and was such a staunch “Gentleman” on would think he would have had the Guts to do something. However, I suspect though, all politicians have open hands, back pockets and yellow streak .

messenger charles
messenger charles
Oct 23, 2020 12:01 PM
Reply to  John

I think you will find Churchill was a Freemason and had Chamberlain poisoned.

“Nevile Chamberlain spent 4 years with a team of experts who were allowed into every German factory. Chamberlian believed Britain should join with Germany against the Soviet Bloc, which is why he was slowly poisoned by Churchills doctor Lord Moran. Lawrence Burgis, Churchill’s secretary, spoke of this on the record before his death.”

— Robert P (Henry Makow web page)

Voxi Pop
Voxi Pop
Oct 22, 2020 3:38 AM

https://worldchangebrief.webnode.com

BREAKING RUMOR: BIDEN WILL BE OUT, HILLARY PUT ON TICKET

Steven Augustine
Steven Augustine
Oct 22, 2020 8:54 AM
Reply to  Voxi Pop

Ha ha ha. Nah.

Voxi Pop
Voxi Pop
Oct 22, 2020 9:30 AM

care to gamble ; D a horserace now

Steven Augustine
Steven Augustine
Oct 22, 2020 5:13 PM
Reply to  Voxi Pop

I think that if it isn’t T-Rump, it’s going to be (a post-incapacitated-Biden ) Harris. She’s a woman, she’s “of color”… TFIC will get that Left/Liberal Cover they love to hide behind. She won’t be another BHO because she isn’t coming in with a “clean slate”… but she’s the closest TFIC have to that.

Mike Ellwood
Mike Ellwood
Oct 23, 2020 3:38 AM

Why no clean slate? And who will be her Deputy Dawg?

Steven Augustine
Steven Augustine
Oct 23, 2020 10:07 AM
Reply to  Mike Ellwood

“Why no clean slate? And who will be her Deputy Dawg?”

Well, Mike, here’s one of many headlines to answer the first half of that question (laugh):

“Kamala Harris’s controversial record on criminal justice, explained
Harris has characterized herself as a reformer. But some critics disagree.

As to the second half of the question: I’m so perfectly uninformed on that matter that I wouldn’t even hazard a guess!

Martin Usher
Martin Usher
Oct 22, 2020 2:44 AM

Unfortuantely these days the mere fact that you’re on a pedestal is reason enough to knock you off. We’ve done an awful job of educating people over the last 30 years or more; its not that we want them to remember ‘facts’, they’re good enough at that and then some, but what they’ve lost is the ability to reason around what they’re told, to use perspective. Its all “Four Legs Good, Two Legs Bad” these days with whatever the current orthodoxy is being peddled as absolute truth. Trying to judge people by contemporary standards for their thoughts and feelings 200 years ago is asinine; just understanding the relation between officers and men in the Navy of that period would be illuminating (because while the men were not slaves in the sense that they weren’t chattels they were definitely not free — and a lot of them got into the service by being press ganged).

Nelson was a contemporary of William Wilberforce. He is a politiican most associated with the anti-slavery movement in Britain, a movement that gained considerable momentum by the 1780s. An Act eventually banning the slave trade was passed in the early 1790s and enforcement would have been the responsiblity of the Royal Navy (except that they were too preoccupied with France and the like — priorities). Someone like Nelson would have been ambivalent towards Negroes (i.e. people from West Africa), he may have come across them in his cruises and even had one or two as members of ships crews but by the time of Trafalgar slavery was not just illegal but also immoral in the popular mind.

Rhys Jaggar
Rhys Jaggar
Oct 22, 2020 3:15 AM
Reply to  Martin Usher

Get your facts right:

  1. Battle of Trafalgar was in 1805, the first Slavery Abolition Act was not until 1807, so it was still legal at the time of Trafalgar.
  2. The Act of 1807 did not make the practice of slavery illegal, it merely criminalised the slave trade. So slavery continued to some degree.
  3. The 1833 Abolition of Slavery Act abolished slavery in much of the British Empire, but the East India Company was allowed to continue slavery in its owned territories and slavery in Ceylon and St Helena continued. So that’s all right, eh?

If you think that there is a principle to ‘abolishing slavery’ but you let the most repugnant global drug dealer (the East India Company) continue the practice, you don’t have much of a principled mindset. Quite clearly, the murderous mafia of the EIC made it quite clear to every Westminster politician that they would be bumped off if they tried to forcibly stop them using slaves.

So our ‘great leaders’ cowtowed to a bunch equivalent at the time to Pablo Escobar.

May have been pragmatic, but it wasn’t very heroic, was it?

Edith
Edith
Oct 22, 2020 4:58 AM
Reply to  Rhys Jaggar

I suspect while some of that may be true it isn’t totally…I am a descent of both the lord Nelson tribe and the lushingtons who ran the east india coy during some of its history….now the wildman side of family owned slaves in West Indies but they married into the lushingtons and next generations worked with lady Byron to abolish slavery…people do sometimes change as history changes…
The Nelson tribe married lushingtons later and were in Ceylon growing tea and I can only wince at what labour was used there but thought by then it was the unfortunate Indians

I don’t know all my history but like everyone else it is never quite as black and white as it may seem..And sometimes one would prefer not to have it…

Dylan Jones
Dylan Jones
Oct 22, 2020 8:56 PM
Reply to  Edith

I reckon a few of your distant relatives may still be running drugs. HSBC is the bank that laundered the Opium proceeds and it still launders today. The networks haven’t changed all that much.

EDITH W CROWTHER
EDITH W CROWTHER
Oct 22, 2020 11:09 PM
Reply to  Dylan Jones

no doubt they are….. and yes the networks for some parts have not changed. what has always been of bemusement to me is that these ancestors of mine started out as Clergy….. humble church of england ministers who appear to have married the right women to get their crowns of glory one way or another…….. in part via the early banking system….i.e. someone had to finance the slave and cotton trade it seems….move on to sugar, tea and opium and these days anything else that needs financing and laundering……..and run the slave plantations. And some of the genes became intertwined with negro so may even be part of the black lives matter movement…….

Rick
Rick
Oct 22, 2020 2:29 AM

This is the Kali Yuga. The final period of this cycle characterised by lies and deceipt and corruption. I wish there was a real virus but I fear they can’t even get that right. I can’t even watch the news any more. The constant barrage of lies makes me feel ill. I don’t need Doctors from Harvard or Stanford to tell me. I know horseshit when I see it.

George Mc
George Mc
Oct 22, 2020 9:23 AM
Reply to  Rick

No need to watch the news. Just watch World War Z. It’s the same thing.

Dylan Jones
Dylan Jones
Oct 21, 2020 11:45 PM

The spiritual form of Nelson guiding Leviathan
“Instead of a lifelike portrait, Blake paints Nelson’s “Spiritual” likeness. He stands on top of the Biblical sea creature, Leviathan, whose body encircles him. Nelson controls the beast with a bridle, attached to its neck, which he holds loosely in his left hand. Trapped in, crushed under, or in one case, half-consumed within Leviathan’s coiled body, ten figures, male and female, are arranged around the figure of Nelson; these represent the European nations defeated by the British during the Napoleonic Wars. Under his feet is a black body, whose wrists are fettered. The head and arms of the figure to the bottom left appear to be submerged under water, which occupies the lowest portion of the painting. Nelson stands in the centre of a graphic explosion of colour, creating a corona of light around him.”
https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/becoming-modern/romanticism/romanticism-in-england/a/blake-the-spiritual-form-of-nelson-guiding-leviathan

comment image

Dylan Jones
Dylan Jones
Oct 21, 2020 11:39 PM

I see no Coronavirus.

Dylan Jones
Dylan Jones
Oct 22, 2020 7:25 AM
Reply to  Dylan Jones

“Don’t kiss me Hardy, just in case.”

scott work-shy
scott work-shy
Oct 22, 2020 8:58 AM
Reply to  Dylan Jones

Kiss me Hardy but keep your mask on

Mike Ellwood
Mike Ellwood
Oct 23, 2020 3:40 AM
Reply to  scott work-shy

“England expects every man to do his mask up”.

aspnaz
aspnaz
Oct 21, 2020 11:25 PM

profiled in my book Inclusive Leadership (2019)

Drucker time again?

Loverat
Loverat
Oct 21, 2020 10:51 PM

You know, if I had thought an article such as this would be on here, I would have submitted my tribute toWinston Churchil.

But in all seriousness, reflect on the historical context. We can all sneer at past leaders based on so called standards today but such figures stand head and shoulders above Johnson, Hancock, Bush, Clinton, Blair and Obama.

aspnaz
aspnaz
Oct 21, 2020 11:26 PM
Reply to  Loverat

Because you know far less about them. Ignorance is bliss.

Geoff S
Geoff S
Oct 21, 2020 11:30 PM
Reply to  Loverat

If ministers or presidents were selected from the general population by random lottery, I would say the chances are very favourable that we would have been better served than we were by the names you mention. That’s a very low bar you set for Nelson to hurdle.

invitado
invitado
Oct 22, 2020 9:04 AM
Reply to  Geoff S

Sorry, voted down when I wanted to hit reply.And that to say that the lottery method would by definition guarantee a much better result, but not because of considerations about personal talents and characteristics but because you would automatically rule out that those people who want to govern govern.

Watt
Watt
Oct 23, 2020 1:49 AM
Reply to  invitado

‘rule out that those people who want to govern govern.’

Indeed.

John
John
Oct 22, 2020 2:04 AM
Reply to  Loverat

Churchill, don’t make me laugh. (or cry).

Martin Usher
Martin Usher
Oct 22, 2020 2:54 AM
Reply to  Loverat

Churchill had a rather checkered history so I hope the your post was somewhat in jest. Notable incidents from his career include Sidney Street, the Dardanelles and dealing with irritating arab tribesmen in the early 1920s using, among other things, the RAF to bomb them with poison gas.

He was a pariah for a lot of his career because of his not infrequent screwups. This, I think, paradoxically worked out well for everyone since if he’d been yet another conforming upper class twit he’d have been all in with the Nazis like much of the British establishment He being out of favor probably allowed him to see the Nazis not as a right thinking bunch (if a bit eccentric with all those uniforms and torchlight parades) but as a major threat to life, liberty and the persuit of happiness for all mankind (except the Herrenvolk, of course). So he gets revered for being in the right place at the right time to set the right tone. Good for him. It doesn’t mean that the British public were prepared to rehabilitiate the Tories, though, because in 1945 he was out on his ear. (Five years or so of enforced austerity saw their minds right, though.)

THX-1143
THX-1143
Oct 22, 2020 9:34 AM
Reply to  Martin Usher
mgeo
mgeo
Oct 22, 2020 12:32 PM
Reply to  THX-1143

Thanks THX. From the comments here, it seems these people have no idea what Churchill was up to. Too much BBC?

Loverat
Loverat
Oct 22, 2020 1:44 PM
Reply to  Martin Usher

Martin Usher

It was partly, hence the qualification in the post. But there was a serious message within it too, which you touched on.

That Churchill had a chequered history, spanning 9 decades. Much bad, some good. And when considered for the times he lived in, possibly a far better person and leader than the current day ones mentioned.

Accurate perception of events is something we lack very much. Covid for example. In March, Off G and some of us could see the disaster unfolding based on proportion of measures. We could see the big picture.

8 months later, despite the science now proven in favour of the sceptics, many still struggle with perception.

Sadly It’s going to take this disaster to affect all of us, for enough to wake up. and it will within a few months. I thought brainpower and care for humanity would prevail before we got to this stage but, not so. Anyway digressing but sure you get the point.

Rhys Jaggar
Rhys Jaggar
Oct 22, 2020 3:16 AM
Reply to  Loverat

The article is basically an advert for the author’s book.

Geoff S
Geoff S
Oct 21, 2020 10:42 PM

Not sure why we need an article that just seems to be to promote some management trainers book, but whatever her opinion of Nelson, she really would sound more credible if she didn’t feel the need to whitewash the guy.

Sure Nelson was a very accomplished leader and by all means talk about it (not on off-guardian though, please), but he was a great friend to the slave owners. And as for his treatment of other officers, well he may have been a great guy, just so long as the officer in question didn’t threaten to outshine him. Little mention here of how he jealously squashed Sir Sidney Smith who was likely a better tactician, better leader and certainly a better diplomat than Nelson. Napoleon was certainly aware and showed more respect to Smith than Nelson as an opponent.

Also not sure what makes the writer so sure the letter was a forgery. A source would have been useful.

Jen
Jen
Oct 22, 2020 1:50 AM
Reply to  Geoff S

It seems that Horatio Nelson’s attitude towards the institution of slavery was rather more complicated than it has been portrayed.

Nelson’s loyalty was to the British navy and to protecting British interests – which included British trade (and that relied in large part on slavery and the slave trade).

The letter that Gloria Moss refers to, which Horatio Nelson wrote to Simon Taylor, in which Nelson expresses his opposition to William Wilberforce’s abolitionist efforts, is lost. In 1807, two years after Nelson’s death, Taylor presented journalist / pamphleteer William Cobbett with what Taylor claims to be Nelson’s letter supporting slavery in an effort to hitch Nelson’s patriotism and reputation to the opposition against a proposed bill to outlaw slavery in the British empire. Cobbett published the letter in his Political Register. The likelihood that Taylor forged parts of Nelson’s “letter” seems strong.

Nelson was suspicious of Wilberforce’s motives in supporting abolition given that Wilberforce was (at the same as he was an abolitionist) opposed to trade unions and giving workers the right to organise themselves in trade unions. Wilberforce also was not exactly in favour of women’s rights, to the extent that he even disapproved of women being involved in the abolition movement.

The issue though is the agenda behind the drive to take down historic figures like Nelson and others based on their supposed attitudes towards slavery. There must certainly be more to a particular rewriting of British history through the junking of Nelson and others revered by the British general public, and not others.

Dayne
Dayne
Oct 22, 2020 3:51 PM
Reply to  Geoff S

Exactly. Someone’s peddling their courses in leadership training, whatever the **** that means. Complete with the pathological need to deaden, dissect and label everything, as in “The Fifteen Traits of Inspired Leadership!” How about we all behave as decent humans and treat others with respect? Then we won’t need 15 or 16 or 25 traits of anything.

S Cooper
S Cooper
Oct 21, 2020 10:39 PM

“Well one thing one can say about him is he had the good sense to go out on a high note and take one for the motherland. If only the idiots today would follow his example… and very soon.”

Borncynic
Borncynic
Oct 21, 2020 10:25 PM

This article is a shocker.

hexon
hexon
Oct 21, 2020 10:20 PM

The UK is no longer run in the UK, it is run from the USA.

Twinkletoes
Twinkletoes
Oct 21, 2020 11:04 PM
Reply to  hexon

It hasn’t been run by the UK for decades. Google maps was created for the invasion and Amazon will run the retail sector when all the others have been run into the ground off the back of a supposed killer virus.

Hancock put his foot in it a few months ago when he gleefully announced PPE would be deliverd by Amazon. And to think people voted for these killer clowns.

Dylan Jones
Dylan Jones
Oct 21, 2020 11:52 PM
Reply to  hexon

It’s run from the City of London, as is Wall Street and the USA.

Theobalt
Theobalt
Oct 22, 2020 3:24 AM
Reply to  Dylan Jones

Thanks! Finally…

Gwyn
Gwyn
Oct 22, 2020 6:50 PM
Reply to  Dylan Jones

The British Empire never went away.

Richard Bartholomew
Richard Bartholomew
Oct 23, 2020 7:33 AM
Reply to  Dylan Jones

As shown by documentary, “The Spider’s Web”, available on Youtube.

Nixon Scraypes
Nixon Scraypes
Oct 23, 2020 8:39 PM

A good documentary as far as it went but it left me uneasy. I also watched a public Qand A session about the film with it’s makers. It seemed to me they wanted the EU to curtail the City’s shenanigans but I feel quite confident that the EU is controlled by the same faces that run the City. Then they talked about a worldwide tax system and I saw their game, NWO.

Dylan Jones
Dylan Jones
Oct 26, 2020 6:34 PM
Reply to  Nixon Scraypes

They talked about rectifying the existing worldwide tax system so that the ultra-wealthy have to pay their fair share.

This is the game the oligarchs play:

anybody who suggests a fair tax for the 1% as well as the 99″ – NWO
anybody who suggests a free unfettered market – NWO.

The NWO or Old World Order as it should be called is a fusion of government and private corporations. They have the public and the private spheres fully under control.

Deep State Monopoly Capitalism/Socialism.

Dylan Jones
Dylan Jones
Oct 26, 2020 6:37 PM
Reply to  Dylan Jones

The Zombie Spider in the City of Londonhttps://bakerstreetrising.home.blog/2019/12/09/the-zombie-spider-in-the-city-of-london/

Jim McDonagh
Jim McDonagh
Oct 21, 2020 10:17 PM

I liked Churchill’s musing on the English navy ” Rum cruelty and buggery”

JuraCalling
JuraCalling
Oct 22, 2020 6:17 AM
Reply to  Jim McDonagh

That could have been the on the Churchill Coat Of Arms. The family motto / tradition 😉

Mike Ellwood
Mike Ellwood
Oct 22, 2020 3:53 PM
Reply to  Jim McDonagh