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Partly Truth and Partly Fiction – Totally Genius: Kris Kristofferson

Edward Curtin

PHOTO BY: Lacy Atkins / The Tennessean

He who binds to himself a joy
Does the winged life destroy;
But he who kisses the joy as it flies
Lives in eternity’s sun rise.

– William Blake, Eternity

Great songwriters, like great poets, are possessed by a passionate melancholic sensibility that gives them joy in the telling.  They seem always to be homesick for a home they can’t define or find.  At the heart of their songs is a presence of an absence that is unnameable. That is what draws listeners in.

While great songs usually take but a few minutes to travel from the singer’s mouth to the listener’s ears, they keep echoing for a long time, as if they had taken both singer and listener on a circular journey out and back, and then, in true Odyssean fashion, replay the cyclic song of the shared poetic mystery that is life and death, love and loss, the going up and coming down, the abiding nostalgia for a future home.

Kris Kristofferson’s songs keep echoing in my mind.

My very old mother, as she neared death, would often tell me, “Don’t let me go.”  I would tell her I was trying, knowing my efforts were a temporary stay and that through our conversations we were building what D. H. Lawrence called her “ship of death”:

Build then the ship of death, for you must take
the longest journey, to oblivion.
And die the death, the long and painful death
that lies between the old self and the new.
***
We are dying, we are dying, so all we can do
is now to be willing to die, and to build the ship
of death to carry the soul on the longest journey.
***
And the little ship wings home, faltering and lapsing
on the pink flood,
and the frail soul steps out, into her house again
filling the heart with peace.

In those days she also used to ask me: “Now that you have lived more of your life in Massachusetts than in New York City, where do you say you are from and which do you consider your home?”  I didn’t know what to say but would wonder where I would like to be buried, as if it mattered.  I would be dead.  Home.  I don’t think so.  Not underground, so why does it matter where.  Home isn’t a place for permanently sleeping.  It’s the place from which we launch our ships out into the world.  The place that we discover when all our sailings are done.

Where was the lightning before it flashed?

Kris Kristofferson, who is now an old man in his mid-80s, is an astonishing songwriter, a man of faith and conscience, and a humorously devilish performer with an on-stage persona of a spiritual satyr.  He has written and performed some of the finest songs in the American songbook.  A man’s and a woman’s man, he has written songs of exquisite passion and sensitivity and rough rollicking freedom that only an emotionless zombie would fail to be moved by.  And in the last 10 or so  years he has fearlessly confronted his mortality, writing many brave songs that bookend his earliest hits, such as Help Me Make It Through the Night.

I have loved and listened to his music for a long time and have wished to honor him for years.

This is my small tribute to a great artist.

Counterpose what is perhaps his most well-known song, Me and Bobby McGee, first made famous by the rocking swirling twirling wild dervish Janice Joplin, a former lover so I’ve heard, with his lilting poem that is little known: Shadows of Her Mind.  Two meditations in very different song styles on love, loneliness, searching, loss, and the secrets of one’s soul – a magician at work. Whether partly truth or partly fiction doesn’t matter.  Secrets are secrets.

Kristofferson broke barriers when he found success in Nashville’s country and western scene in the early 1970s. He made explicit the sexuality and the yearning for love that underlay traditional country music. The endless yearning that never ends. Its secret. Not just sex in the back room of a honky-tonk, but the “Achin’ with the feelin’ of the freedom of an eagle when she flies,” as he sings in Loving Her Was Easier. Something intangible. True passion for love and life.

He was an oddball. Here was a man whose inspiration for Me and Bobby McGee was a foreign film, La Strada (The Road), made by the extraordinary Italian filmmaker Federico Fellini. Not the stuff of movie theaters in small Texas towns. In the film, Anthony Quinn is driving around on a motorcycle with a feeble-minded girl whose playing of a trombone gets on his nerves, so while she is sleeping, he abandons her by the side of the road. He later hears a woman singing the melody the girl was always playing and learns the girl has died. Kris explains:

To me, that was the feeling at the end of ‘Bobby McGee.’ The two-edged sword that freedom is. He was free when he left the girl, but it destroyed him. That’s where the line ‘Freedom’s just another name for nothing left to lose’ came from.

Not exactly country, yet a traditional storyteller, a Rhodes scholar and a former Army Captain, an Oxford “egghead” in love with romantic poetry, a sensitive athlete, a risk-taker who gave up a teaching position at West Point for a janitor’s job in Nashville to try his hand at songwriting, a patriot with a dissenter’s heart, he is an unusual man, to put it mildly. A gambler. A man who knows that heaven and hell are born together and that the body and soul cannot be divorced, that all art is incarnational and meant to be about ecstasy and misery, not the middle normal ground where people measure out their lives in coffee spoons. He’s always wanted to tell what he knew, come what may, as he sings in To Beat the Devil:

I was born a lonely singer, and I’m bound to die the same,
But I’ve got to feed the hunger in my soul.
And if I never have a nickel, I won’t ever die ashamed.
‘Cos I don’t believe that no-one wants to know.

What do people want to knowA bit here and there, I guess, but not too much, not the secrets of our souls. Not the truth about their government’s killers, the lies that drive a Billy Dee to drugs and death and the hypocritical fears of cops and people who wish to squelch the truths of the desperate ones for fear that they might reveal secrets best buried with the bodies.  Secrets not about the dead but the living.

There are only a handful of songwriters with the artistic gift of soul sympathy to write verses like the following, and Kris has done it again and again over fifty years:

Billy Dee was seventeen when he turned twenty-one
Fooling with some foolish things he could’ve left alone
But he had to try to satisfy a thirst he couldn’t name
Driven toward the darkness by the devils in his veins

All around the honky-tonks, searching for a sign
Gettin’ by on gettin’ high on women, words and wine
Some folks called him crazy, Lord, and others called him free
But we just called us lucky for the love of Billy Dee

Like William Blake, one of Kristofferson’s mentors – “Can I see another’s woe/And not be in sorrow too?/Can I see another’s grief/And not seek for kind relief?” – Billy Dee captures in rollicking sound more truth about addiction than a thousand self-important editorials about drugs.

Kristofferson joins with Dylan Thomas, the Welsh bard, another wild man with an exquisite sense for the music of language and the married themes of youth and age, sex and death, love and loss, home and the search, always the search:

The force that through the green fuse drives the flower
Drives my green age; that blasts the roots of trees
Is my destroyer.
And I am dumb to tell the crooked rose
My youth is bent by the same wintry fever.

Although most of his songs lack overt political content, such concerns are scattered throughout his massive oeuvre (nearly 400 songs) where his passion for the victims of America’s war machine and his respect for great spiritual heroes like Gandhi, Martin Luther King, and John and Robert Kennedy ring out in very powerful songs that are not well known.  Note his use of the word they in They Killed Him, surely not a mistake for such a careful songwriter.

And in The Circle, a song about Bill  Clinton killing with a missile an Iraqi artist and her husband and the wounding of her children, his condemnation is powerful as he links it to the disappeared of Argentina in a circle of sorrow.  Of course no one is responsible.

“Not I” said the soldier
“I just follow orders and it was my duty to do my job well”
“Not I” said the leader who ordered the slaughter
“Im saddened it happened, but then, war is hell”
“Not us” said the others who heard of the horror
Turned a cold shoulder on all that was done
In all the confusion a single conclusion
The circle of sorrow has only begun

As everyone knows, songs have a powerful hold on our memories, and sometimes we learn ironic truths about them only years later.

When I was young, my large family, consisting of my parents and seven sisters and me – Bronx kids – would go on vacation for a week in the late summer to a farm called Edgewater.  We would pack our clothes in cartons weeks in advance and would load into the car like sardines layered in a can.  On the trip north to the Catskill mountains, in our wild excitement we would sing all sorts of happy songs, many from Broadway shows.  As we approached the farm, we would go crazy with excitement and sing over and over the repetitive song we had learned somewhere: We’re Here Because We’re Here Because We’re Here.  To us it was a song of joy; we had arrived at our Shangri-La, our ideal home, paradise regained.  To this day, the name Edgewater is like Proust’s madeleine dipped in tea for many of us.

What we didn’t know was that the song we were singing was the sardonic song that WW I soldiers sang as they awaited absurd and senseless death in the mud and rat-filled trenches of the war to end all wars.  Sardonic words to them and joy to us. They were there because they were there and it was meaningless.  We sang it out of joy.  So Blakean:

Man was made for joy and woe
Then when this we rightly know
Through the world we safely go.
Joy and woe are woven fine
A clothing for the soul to bind.

To listen to Kris Kristofferson’s vast oeuvre is a confirmation of that Blakean truth.  It is to realize that all those songs he has written and sung have been his way of fulfilling the words of another Romantic poet who was Blake’s contemporary, John Keats.  Keats called life “a vale of soul-making,” meaning that people are not souls until they make themselves by developing an individual identity by doing what they were meant to do.

In Ken Burns’ fascinating documentary series, Country Music, Kris answers the question of why he took such a radical turn early on and gave up his military road to success for a lowly job as a janitor in Nashville where he hoped to write songs.  He said:

I love William Blake…. William Blake said, ‘If he who is organized by the divine for spiritual communion, refuse and bury his talent in the earth, even though he should want natural bread, shame and confusion of face will pursue him throughout life to eternity.’

When he answered this call of the spirit and took such a dramatic turn away from the conventional road to success, his mother wrote him a letter essentially disowning him (“dis-owning” – an interesting word!).  When Kris showed it to Johnny Cash, Cash said, “Isn’t it nice to get a letter from home?”

Not devoid of humor, Kristofferson wrote Jessie Younger, a catchy tune that no doubt concealed his pain while sharing it, an example of his extraordinary ability to use words in paradoxical ways.  A close examination of so many of his lyrics leaves me aghast at his talent.

There are just a handful of songwriter/performers who can match the art of Kris Kristofferson. Bob Dylan and Leonard Cohen come to mind, men whose work also contains that deep spiritual questing for home.  Both have been greatly celebrated in recent years, Dylan with the Nobel Prize and Cohen with accolades after his death.

Kris Kristofferson may have been “out of sight and out of mind” in recent days, so I would like to bring him back to your attention and salute him.

Thank you, Kris.  You are an inspiration.  Blessings.

Encore:

Edward Curtin is a writer whose work has appeared widely. He teaches sociology at Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts. His website is http://edwardcurtin.com/. He is the author of the new book Seeking Truth in A Country of Lies

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Mr Y
Mr Y
Dec 17, 2020 11:47 AM

Totally genius? How about enjoying his music and leaving worshiping out of the picture?

Winnetou
Winnetou
Dec 17, 2020 2:57 AM

Yes, your handle says it all… Jerk-off. Likely your greatest talent. What have you done for this world that you can say you are proud of? If your comment here is any indication, you are not worthy of a janitor’s job.

Jyrkoff
Jyrkoff
Dec 16, 2020 3:20 PM

Ugh. Talk about head in the clouds. That wasn’t fun to read at all!

Kristofferson et al have written some serious masses of insipid, throwaway lyrics that this author clearly has never heard. I despise Dylan but adore Cohen– yet Cohen has a LOT of really awful songs that are very hard to endure. I do like Kristofferson, yet he too has many catalogue entries that we would do well to pretend never happened. And Jim Morrison? Big influence as a teen, but now I can see (or rather hear) how utterly terrible a lot of The Doors song are and how awful a person Morrison was.

And even Kris admits freely that he’s not a singer or performer and hates doing those things. I hate hearing him do them, he’s awful. Then we have Gordon Lightfoot, a decent songwriter but a lounge singer performer, and anything from him in the last 30 years or so illustrate why “know when to quit” is good advice. He could have retired after “Sundown” and we’d be happy. Hell, even Harry Chapin was good with the pen but his shows were sloppy, shoddy, and even he admitted he’d perform a kid’s birthday party in a backyard as readily as a sold-out MSG. No standards.

Everyone’s a fan, everyone’s a critic but devoting this much time and energy into infotainment content like this that is a mere indulgence not a necessity and certainly not important, is rather offensive against the backdrop of mainstream media lies and government propaganda.

Why does this Rolling Stone-esque fluff piece appears in the hard-hitting, non-nonsense pages of OG?

Eric Blair
Eric Blair
Dec 16, 2020 10:47 PM
Reply to  Jyrkoff

Miserable much, Jyrkoff? God forbid a guy writes about relaxing and listening to some music he enjoys when he could instead be penning bitter screeds denouncing all and sundry. Bah humbug to you too, friend.

Wayne Vanderploeg
Wayne Vanderploeg
Dec 15, 2020 3:06 AM

Refreshing twist for a normally dark and sad web site…..

Superbuggg
Superbuggg
Dec 14, 2020 3:22 PM

‘Always better to worship the art and not the artist! You have obviously not read Cathy O’Brien’s version of events… http://www.whale.to/b/kristofferson_h.html

Superbuggg
Superbuggg
Dec 14, 2020 3:44 PM
Reply to  Superbuggg
Greg Burton
Greg Burton
Dec 14, 2020 5:15 PM
Reply to  Superbuggg

Just about to load the same link. Second time in a week the Off-Guardian wrote a positive piece about a Deep State apparatchik. The other being Naomi Klein. The cover-up artist for MK-ULTRA mind programming (Satanic Ritual Abuse vs. ‘Shock Doctrine’).

Partly Truth and Partly Fiction? Apt title.

Trance Formation of America http://www.whale.to/b/obrien_b.html

Malatok
Malatok
Dec 14, 2020 12:56 PM

Cool is in the soul…..

timfrom
timfrom
Dec 14, 2020 11:51 AM

Lovely article. Just two quibbles: Janice ??? Come off it. Never seen her christian name spelt that way before.

And you can add Neil Young to Dylan & Cohen!

Jacques
Jacques
Dec 14, 2020 6:26 AM

“Art that’s lovely” is probably kitsch, entertainment.

Art is not supposed to be “lovely”. Lovely is a crap word. Meaningless, devoid of any descriptive value, only expressing the beholder’s contentment with what he/she sees. Art that aims to appeal to the consumer is not art, but entertainment. Entertainment is perfectly fine, nothing wrong with that. But it’s not art in the sense of breaking the bounds of the conventional, exploring the reaches beyond the status quo, discovering formerly unimagined concepts, conducing mankind to progress, preventing stagnation, regression.

Binra
Binra
Dec 14, 2020 11:27 AM
Reply to  Jacques

As soon as ‘supposed’ comes into play, art is conformed.
If the discipline is a free willing acceptance – such then it operates constraint constructively.
Art is the verb ‘to be’ – there is nothing that can be definitively said about or of being that does not constrain to form or pattern.
Truly moved is not artificial.
Yet artifice is not altogether escapable in the arising of a self-consciousness.

Self-image can usurp or substitute for ‘the joy as it flies’.

The dancing between is neither one not the other – nothing I can say but knots now.

I recognise the romanticisation of pain and loss, as a milking of it.
Likewise the frontiers of the monsters at the threshhold.
Life is a giving and receiving.
It takes one to know one.

Jacques
Jacques
Dec 14, 2020 1:40 PM
Reply to  Binra

Not sure what exactly you’re trying to say … What exactly are you trying to say … :-O …?

Howard
Howard
Dec 14, 2020 3:17 PM
Reply to  Jacques

“Lovely” is to Art as saying “Oh that’s so sweet” is to having done something heartfelt for someone.

Chris
Chris
Dec 14, 2020 2:37 AM

A wonderful tribute. Thank you

Patrick Corbett
Patrick Corbett
Dec 13, 2020 10:05 PM

A well deserved tribute. I met Kris at a party in the 80s when I lived in Los Angeles. You may not believe this–I probably wouldn’t but I used to get taken for him sometimes–same age, same build, very similar beard. I told him that when we chatted, he laughed and asked me what I say when people mistake me for him. I told him I don’t say anything, I just start singing “Me and Bobbie McGee.”

Voxy Pop
Voxy Pop
Dec 13, 2020 9:52 PM

https://worldchangebrief.webnode.com
US DEEP STATE Explained/
Election IS Cyberwar Pearl Harbor/
Senate Reports On Biden Crimes/
CCP Infiltrators Unveiled Globally/
Case For Insurrection Act/
Truckers Blockade US Cities/
West Coast Lawlessness/
Eyewitness: Pope A Committed Globalist/
US Begins Vaxxing

mae
mae
Dec 14, 2020 4:31 PM
Reply to  Voxy Pop

horseshit crap you flog

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Dec 13, 2020 9:41 PM

To my mind, the whitening of rock ‘n roll was a reaction to civil rights.

LBJ signed the papers in ’64, when he allegedly said “I’ll have those n*****s voting Democratic for 200 years”. Very many doubt his bona fides. It was, it seems, a cynical ploy and a double-edged sword.

Snopes scratches its ass for 600 words then declares it can’t decide: unproven. Well, just look at the soiled bedclothes, Mikkelson. You should be familiar with that. Look at the blood-splattered clothes of Martin Luther King and Malcolm X. Unproven?

Just as drums had been banned back in slavery times, Black influence was about to be wrested from Black hands by the arms of state. And the scraggy bearded white bois were set up to answer the call of appropriation, magnificently.

Willie Dixon’s You Need Love (1962) Performed by Muddy Waters

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Dec 13, 2020 8:01 PM

Who taught you to dance, boy?

Even Elvis took lessons.

Big Mama Thornton – Hound Dog (1952)

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Dec 13, 2020 8:17 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

Fact is, the model for White rocker boys was big, Black women.

Life is full of surprises and littered with unintended consequences.
Politicians follow and try to hold on. They can’t and don’t lead.
Predictions and central planning don’t work, never have.
Give up the hair gel and take a funking risk.
Kiss mummy and let her go.

JuraCaling
JuraCaling
Dec 13, 2020 8:40 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

Thar she blows….who would dare come home late to her ..i swear John Lee behind her is dancing out of fear 😉

Lost in a dark wood
Lost in a dark wood
Dec 13, 2020 7:47 PM

It is right it should be so;
Man was made for joy and woe;
And when this we rightly know,
Thro’ the world we safely go.
Joy and woe are woven fine,
A clothing for the soul divine.
Under every grief and pine
Runs a joy with silken twine.

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Pickering_Manuscript/Auguries_of_Innocence

Lost in a dark wood
Lost in a dark wood
Dec 13, 2020 9:17 PM

The Stolen & Perverted Writings of Homer & Ovid; of Plato & Cicero. which all Men ought to contemn: are set up by artifice against the Sublime of the Bible. but when the New Age is at leisure to Pronounce; all will be set right: & those Grand Works of the more ancient & consciously & professedly Inspired Men, will hold their proper rank. & the Daughters of Memory shall become the Daughters of Inspiration.

Shakespeare & Milton were both curbd by the general malady & infection from the silly Greek & Latin slaves of the Sword. Rouze up O Young Men of the New Age! set your foreheads against the ignorant Hirelings! For we have Hirelings in the Camp, the Court, & the University: who would if they could, for ever depress Mental & prolong Corporeal War. Painters! on you I call! Sculptors! Architects! Suffer not the fashonable Fools to depress your powers by the prices they pretend to give for contemptible works or the expensive advertizing boasts that they make of such works; believe Christ & his Apostles that there is a Class of Men whose whole delight is in Destroying.

We do not want either Greek or Roman models if we are but just & true to our own imaginations, those Worlds of Eternity in which we shall live forever; in Jesus our Lord.

And did those feet in ancient time,
Walk upon Englands mountains green:
And was the holy Lamb of God,
On Englands pleasant pastures seen!

And did the Countenance Divine,
Shine forth upon our clouded hills?
And was Jerusalem builded here,
Among these dark Satanic Mills?

Bring me my Bow of burning gold;
Bring me my Arrows of desire:
Bring me my Spear: O clouds unfold!
Bring me my Chariot of fire!

I will not cease from Mental Fight,
Nor shall my Sword sleep in my hand:
Till we have built Jerusalem,
In Englands green & pleasant Land

Would to God that all the Lords people were Prophets
Numbers XI, ch 29.v.
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Milton_(excerpts)/Preface

And Moses said unto him, Enviest thou for my sake? would God that all the LORD’s people were prophets, and that the LORD would put his spirit upon them!
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Bible_(King_James)/Numbers#Chapter_11

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Dec 13, 2020 7:10 PM

A turning point in Johnson’s land, new urgencies emerge,

At once we must defend the war and neutralize who err.

New music spins from disks of tar, the message is too black,

White voice we need, to hymn the Volk and flip it on its back.

Mark R. Elsis
Mark R. Elsis
Dec 13, 2020 6:57 PM

In The News
by Kris Kristofferson

Edwige
Edwige
Dec 13, 2020 6:29 PM

“a Rhodes scholar and a former Army Captain”.

Good will come of that combination? Uh-huh….

Igor
Igor
Dec 13, 2020 9:58 PM
Reply to  Edwige

Son of a USAF Major General who was married to an Ashbrook, as well.

Jim Morrison was the son of a USN Admiral, later just happened to be the commander of the fleet that was attacked by ghost gunboats in the Gulf of Tonkin.

nrrman
nrrman
Dec 14, 2020 1:00 PM
Reply to  Igor

just sucomb son
get with the program
get in line soldier
open your mind
the mirror cracked
shattered into a thousand alter
pieces
sucomb
join satan
and cris chris cc
rocky rhodes
rockerfella skank
fabian society
babylon
mind mapping
whore

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Dec 13, 2020 6:19 PM

There is without doubt a hypnotic element to modern popular music which is rare in folk (perhaps hurdy-gurdy) but not in classical music (though Bartok and Janacek sought to reproduce it). And it is not there in songs you sing to yourself. Though it is in religious and performative music, where, surprise, it’s known as trance.

Rather than painting pictures in the mind or lifting one’s perception to new levels, this mediated music holds you down, pushes you back and fills your body, permeating the brain, forcing out other thoughts, a swirling repetition that begins outside, enters the mind and dominates the consciousness. And this is precisely why people use it, like it, defend it and if they can, spend their discretionary income getting more… like a cult member handing over his wealth.

What is this human purr… this mezmerization of a cat or a fish with a spinning object throwing off scales of light?

Painting pictures in the mind was replaced first with sparkly disco balls, then strobe lights and now pulsating projections on a screen, at first external and then internalised.

Music and image push all thought aside. It does not inspire so much as clear the deck. Today’s music has appropriated the body so much that disciples say they like the beat… for the beat… the louder and more throb the better. The vibration of the beat relaxes. The music no longer matters.

Boom… thwack… boom… thack.

Roll over Beethoven.

JuraCaling
JuraCaling
Dec 13, 2020 6:19 PM

I’ve never completely thrown my arms around country music but have always appreciated those with the gift of wordsmithery. And many of those have graced that genre.

Kris was lucky to have been around during the same era of Hank Williams, Bob Dylan, Gordon Lightfoot , and the king of all wordsmiths- Leonard Cohen.

When the bar has been set at a particular level it provides a clear view of the task ahead. The aforementioned writers set it high. Only very few that aspired to reach it succeed. I’d say Kris Kristofferson was one.

I always prefer my music live. I always will. Maybe because my real love is of the blues. But i believe the power of music, like the power of the well chosen phrase can make contact. When it comes live it feels natural and spontaneous. It still manages to do that on the vinyl or CD as laid out in a studio. But the perfectionists always remove some of the raw nature from a song.

Kristofferson is like Willie Nelson this way. As the years continue to etch their stories into the deepening lines of their faces, their spirit sounds weary- but defiant- as it finds an outlet through the war-torn terrains of their lived -in throats. When They sing about loss or pain, you feel as though you too experienced it. When they sing about freedom you know that their determination is all the evidence you need to realise it’s a fight worth fighting. You feel it in your veins.

Me And Bobby McGee is a classic. It’s the spirit of the 60s ; it’s freedom, music, love and loss and all about the journey. Big themes quietly shared within the small rooms that resemble a small, personal journal entry. It’s unmistakingly Kristofferson. Gordon Lightfoot’s version can match it on a good day it has to be said.

Loving Her Was Easier was one of the live songs I first listened to from Kristofferson. That is one of two which I cite as perfect examples that demonstrate the the power of the live experience. It’s one of those songs that stand alone as poetry if you remove the music. Great poets down the ages have often resorted to hyperbole in a desperate attempt to express the depths of their love. Kristofferson does the exact opposite. He manages to capture the endlessness of love, and the power of it’s hold, in the simplest of ways. Yet it comes together as a work of art. When these words fall from his throat in the middle of his latest whiskey-fuelled meeting with his audience- you feel it and you envy him.

”Coming close together with a feeling that i’ve never know before, in my time

She ain’t afraid to be a woman or afraid to be a friend

I don’t know the answer to the easy way she opens every door in my mind

Dreaming was as easy as believing it was never gonna end

Loving her was easier than anything i’ll ever do again”

But if you want that Kristofferson of the 60s then look no further than Sunday Morning Coming Down. This was the young Kristofferson. he liked his whiskey warm and his women wild. And he knew what his wings were for.

”Well I woke up Sunday morning

With no way to hold my head, that didn’t hurt

And the beer I had for breakfast wasn’t bad

So I had one more for dessert”

With an opening like that you know exactly where you are.

”Then I walked across the street

And caught the Sunday smell of someone’s fryin’ chicken

And Lord, it took me back to somethin’

That I’d lost somewhere, somehow, along the way”

The sense of isolation and someone drinking to forget something he’s already forgotten.

”Then I headed down the street

And somewhere far away a lonely bell was ringin’

And it echoed through the canyon

Like the disappearin’ dreams of yesterday”

The sense of someone who wasted it all and designed his own downfall is forgotten when you feel the pain and regret.

”And there’s nothin’ short of dyin’

That’s half as lonesome as the sound

Of a sleepin’ city sidewalk

And Sunday mornin’ comin’ down”

Again, it’s the soul spilled out for examination. It’s practically a confession. It celebrates the carpe diem spirit of that time, but doesn’t deny the price it often charges.

The motif of the bird, and his freedom of flight, is often plundered by poets and writers of songs. It’s an easy yet powerful image, and we can all relate to it and see the attraction.

Often we can’t fly. We were all blessed with the same wings that Kris Kristofferson was blessed with. But life clips our wings early and, eventually, we’ll reach to the poets to experience, albeit briefly and vicariously, that freedom . They took their chance and bared their souls and came back to share their tales. The highs and the lows are all there. All the scars. That’s what separates them from us.

Kristofferson admired Blake, as this article points out. Me too. His poetry as well as his art. I believe he captured the spirit of Kristofferson in a small verse that would surely have resonated with the singer in his The Scoolboy :

”How can a bird that was born for joy, sit in a cage and sing ?”

This is the mission statement for every would-be voyager looking for freedom and love.

Many years ago, Kristofferson cited another poet, Leonard Cohen, in sharing with us what he wanted carved on his tombstone. It’s the opening lines of Mr Cohens Bird On A Wire :

” Like a bird on the wire

Like a drunk in a midnight choir

I have tried in my way to be free.”

Very apt. I’m sure that there’s many more flights left in him before that day arrives.

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Dec 13, 2020 6:43 PM
Reply to  JuraCaling

Captured beautifully.

I think it was the era. Look to Victor Jara in Chile, the great musicians of Brazil in both lyric and melody… and those who sang in poorer countries whose plaintive song never reached us.

Doesn’t art emerge from pain, asked Harry Lime?

And can you hear the echo… of tumbling leaves lost,
Feet pad through years declining, more silent than the moss,
Until our toes lay claim, to that we call our lot.

Sister Rosetta Tharpe — “Didn’t It Rain?”Manchester, 1964

JuraCaling
JuraCaling
Dec 13, 2020 7:05 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

I saw that years ago. I’d forgot all about it and now it’s back..nice one 🙂

She was an absolute legend. Her and ‘Big Mamma’ Thornton. There’s one of Big Mamma and she has three backing singers who look terrified of her and one of them id John Lee Hooker 😉

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Dec 13, 2020 8:15 PM
Reply to  JuraCaling
nrrman
nrrman
Dec 13, 2020 5:16 PM

the rot sets in
from the head on down.
poor kris

a star is never born
but forged worked
tavistock
manufactured

me and bobby magee and my 7
altered states

we worked secretly for the military
from zimmerman
doors to beatles
to rolling strolling bones

from air ministry radar onto
adventures in sound
and lsd
destroyed minds of soldiers
lessons learned from ww1

rolled out in 50s and 60s
for the counter culture
human wars of control

shattered prisms bicameral minds
shocked beast system
fuck you bobby magee.

you got a great voice
and a great head

but you are the devils own
private property

Mucho
Mucho
Dec 13, 2020 4:23 PM

An old favourite

Donald Duck
Donald Duck
Dec 13, 2020 4:04 PM

Slightly off-topic. Shutting down the economy means both SMEs will go bankrupt, workers will be laid off and tax receipts to the government will fall. No wages, no profit, no income or indirect taxes like SET. This means aggregate demand in the economy will fall and more workers made redundant as more businesses go bust. And so it goes on in a vicious spiral. What are these millions of unemployed and bankrupt businesses supposed to do to pay the bills exactly?! And how are the government going to make good the shortfall in their own tax? 1. By taxing even more, and adding a little spice of increased inflation courtesy of the Bank of England. = starvation.

Well one answer is to get hold of some of the loot where it is currently stashed: The Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands, Montserrat, Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of Man. The assets alone in the Cayman Islands is two and a half times larger than the UK’s GDP! These tax havens are British overseas territories and therefore not out of bounds, but do you really think any British government would seriously taking this course of action. Of course not they are the same members of the elite stratum of British society.

Nixon Scraypes
Nixon Scraypes
Dec 13, 2020 5:57 PM
Reply to  Donald Duck

Yes they could could be “bailed in”. Only joking.

Jungblud
Jungblud
Dec 13, 2020 4:02 PM

I dont understand how the off-guardian can not put out a single article on the massive uprising happening in India right now. Are you people actually off-guardian? You sure your not just some cheap paid heckler, that turns out to be a part of the act?
i apologize if what i said was insulting. you guys do a great job. keep it up

ity
ity
Dec 13, 2020 4:26 PM
Reply to  Jungblud

Forgive me for linking to the Guardian, but this is a surprisingly informative article on the Indian uprising. Looks like an attempt at the Great Reset Indian style.

Arsebiscuits
Arsebiscuits
Dec 13, 2020 4:40 PM
Reply to  Jungblud

First I heard of it? Any good links

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Dec 13, 2020 3:43 PM

So they arrived in L.A. at a time when the music industry was in New York. But to Laurel Canyon they went, from all over… an outsized bunch from Washington D.C., and from Canada… Steppenwolf, Buffalo Springfield, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell… several from Germany (half of Steppenwolf, Kris Kristoffersen).. the Mamas and the Papas from St Thomas in the Caribbean…

All to L.A… which in the mid-60s had no significant music industry, live or recorded. The music scene grew up after these artists. Clubs grew like mushrooms… Roxy, Zeroes, London Fog, Whiskey A Go-Go, Kaleidoscope, Pandora’s Box, the Troubadour…

No sooner did our budding artists arrive than they had music venues, a radio station, record labels, then their own publications, Rolling Stone began in 1967 and the L.A. Free Press, with an office at the mouth of Laurel Canyon.

All arrived with ready-written folk-rock songs in the same style… the M&Ps wrote Monday, Monday and California Dreaming while isolated in the Caribbean and yet arrived with an album full of music that was in the same folk-rock style that was just catching fire with the Byrds and Buffalo Springfield.

The Door’s Jim Morrison arrived with a ready-written album of songs, the lyrics and the tunes, yet no musical experience — he said he was more drama than dance.

It all came together, built out of nothing in an amazing short amount of time. Neil Young said, “I don’t know why we went there. We were like lemmings following the Pied Piper.”

Who was the Piper? McGowan could only finger the covert military propaganda operation at Laurel Canyon’s Lookout Mountain that continued at least until 1969.

“Lookout Mountain Laboratory had an advanced research and development department that was on the cutting edge of new film technologies. Such technological advances as 3-D effects were apparently first developed at the Laurel Canyon site. And Hollywood luminaries like John Ford, Jimmy Stewart, Howard Hawks, Ronald Reagan, Bing Crosby, Walt Disney and Marilyn Monroe were given clearance to work at the facility on undisclosed projects. There is no indication that any of them ever spoke of their work at the clandestine studio.

The facility retained as many as 250 producers, directors, technicians, editors, animators, etc., both civilian and military, all with top security clearances – and all reporting to work in a secluded corner of Laurel Canyon. Accounts vary as to when the facility ceased operations.

Some claim it was in 1969, while others say the installation remained in operation longer. In any event, by all accounts the secret bunker had been up and running for more than twenty years before Laurel Canyon’s rebellious teen years, and it remained operational for the most turbulent of those years.” — David McGowan

Arsebiscuits
Arsebiscuits
Dec 13, 2020 4:53 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

https://centerforaninformedamerica.com/laurelcanyon/

INSIDE THE LC: THE STRANGE BUT MOSTLY TRUE STORY OF LAUREL CANYON AND THE BIRTH OF THE HIPPIE GENERATION: PART I
BY DAVE MCGOWAN | MAY 8, 2008

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Dec 13, 2020 5:09 PM
Reply to  Arsebiscuits

Have you seen the documentary, The Wrecking Crew… they produced most of the recorded music for the young, inexperience bands. Roger McGuinn of the Byrds was a rare exception, who could actually play music.

Hal Blaine on drums, Glenn Campbell lead guitar, Leon Russell was the keyboard player, Carole Kaye was the bassist… the early records by most of the famous bands were performed by studio musicians. They were no different to other fake banks like the Monkees.

“The drummer for Toto was devastated to discover that his 10 favorite drummers of all time were the same guy,” — Dave McGowan.

The Beach Boys, The Turtles, the Mamas and the Papas, The Byrds… the same crack musicians were playing: The Wrecking Crew.

Steve Church
Steve Church
Dec 13, 2020 6:11 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

Did you get this from a series of articles on the Laurel Canyon thing? A few months ago, I was reading along when suddenly I couldn’t access any further articles. Fascinating reading. Do you have a link? Thanks.

Steve Church
Steve Church
Dec 13, 2020 6:14 PM
Reply to  Steve Church

Didn’t continue reading the comments. Arsebiscuits has the link. Thanks to both of you.

Nixon Scraypes
Nixon Scraypes
Dec 13, 2020 6:19 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

It’s hard not to notice how everyone’s ignoring that mawkish drivel at the top of the page.
I often skip the articles after a few paragraphs for the more interesting comments.
I resisted the computer for a long time until a friend gave me one of those groovy looking apple made. One of the first things I discovered was the Laurel Canyon and I eagerly awaited each new episode. What an eye opener. I still like the Doors music though.

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Dec 13, 2020 7:45 PM
Reply to  Nixon Scraypes

The music is great. Nothing I write is meant to diminish what these musicians gave us. Few were complicit and even if the were: if they delivered… Revealing who organized or paid for it does not diminish the sound.

unIntellingent agencies (very clever, mind you) may have organized it but political types are not creative. The music came from the bands, first with session musicians (The Wrecking Crew) until they were up to speed.

Art has always had three strands. Those paid to praise the State, the satirists who grant us hope and future, and those who move between the two.

Modern art is wholly in the control of money — because politicians are. The ground for grass roots bands is, economically, very sketchy. We must Hold On (To What We’ve Got)

Nottheonly1
Nottheonly1
Dec 13, 2020 3:41 PM

Anybody else experiencing serious internet/cell phone cutouts? My parents told me the ARD talks about global outages. Uruguay the same. Anybody else?

Is this the beginning of the online reset? With fighting on the streets in D.C. and Washington state? Testing of ICBM’s?

The accept cookies button on OG reappears every time it is clicked. Anybody?

While it may not be on topic – it will be, if nothing goes anymore.

ity
ity
Dec 13, 2020 2:40 PM

To those who complain that OffG doesn’t print the articles that they want, or cover the issues that they think should be covered at any particular point in time, how about you stop moaning, and instead say on these threads what you think needs saying. If what you think needs saying is that important and urgent, you could even submit your own articles.

I don’t know about the personal lives of those running this site, but I’m pretty sure that it could get exhausting pretty quickly, especially during these trying times. Burnout is a very real issue for us all. It’s hard to keep up and stay sane at the same time.

So how about just being grateful that this place exists, and instead of moaning about what isn’t on here, spend that energy filling these threads with what you wish to be reading about.

Be the change you want to see.

And forgive my slightly lecturing tone, but sometimes a thing needs saying.

Arsebiscuits
Arsebiscuits
Dec 13, 2020 1:14 PM

So basically he’s great at fooling people and putting people under a hypnotized spell

Great.

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Dec 13, 2020 2:17 PM
Reply to  Arsebiscuits

That would comport with the findings of the late Dave McGowan, especially Kristofferson’s role as rainmaker… like Zappa, like Rockefeller-by-marriage Vito Paulekas, like David Crosby. The movers and shakers who had the power to make it all happen around them.
Especially given that Kristofferson was a writer. Bob Dylan can tell you how important it is to have a good writer.

Dave McGowan – The Deep State and the Musicians of Laurel Canyon

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Dec 13, 2020 2:34 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

I apologize for posting that particular Dave McGowan interview. Jan Irvin is such a bore. Skip the first 20 minutes.

Dave McGowan was a writer, not so much a talker, to be honest. He turned the history of 1960s music on its head. You can read much for free here: http://centerforaninformedamerica.com/

Better to support his descendants after his untimely death from the famous fast-acting cancer and buy the book from his daughter: Weird Scenes Inside The Canyon.

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Dec 13, 2020 3:10 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

Dave McGowan’s best extant interview is probably that with Henrik Palmgren of Red Ice Radio. Best to jump in at 16:00 minutes.
https://redice.tv/red-ice-radio/covert-ops-behind-the-hippie-dream

Arsebiscuits
Arsebiscuits
Dec 13, 2020 4:59 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

I just shared that to your comment apologies.
My Gmail ain’t sending me notifications of replies to my posts anymore.

Yes dave mcgowan made a great effort joined a lot of dots that most wouldn’t have a clue what’s going on..

el Gallinazo
el Gallinazo
Dec 13, 2020 4:11 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

Least we not forget the “Lizard King,” Jim Morrison of the Doors, whose father was the admiral of the fleet which staged the Gulf of Tonkin false flag hoax, paving the way for LBJ to run a virtual war declaration through the Senate and turning the US involvement into a full scale war.

Arsebiscuits
Arsebiscuits
Dec 13, 2020 4:58 PM
Reply to  el Gallinazo

It was reading dave McGowan that made me aware of that crazy symbolism..
I tried saying that to a normie Doors fan
And just seeing it as an act of rebellion..

You cannot talk ill of the sacredness

Nixon Scraypes
Nixon Scraypes
Dec 13, 2020 7:11 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

I suspect a team of writers. I’m sure I saw he’s got two sons Inthe CFR, reward for a job well done.

Geoff S
Geoff S
Dec 13, 2020 1:13 PM

Wow. All this time, I though Kris Kristofferson died in the 70’s when Dirty Lyle shot his truck off the bridge.

You live and learn

paul
paul
Dec 13, 2020 3:05 PM
Reply to  Geoff S

No. the Rubber Duck could swim.

Geoff S
Geoff S
Dec 13, 2020 4:48 PM
Reply to  paul

10-4

Gin
Gin
Dec 13, 2020 12:57 PM

“He’s a Poet >he’s a picker< He’s a Prophet >he’s a pusher
He’s a preacher & a pilgrim & a problem when He’s stoned,
He’s a walking contradiction, partly truth and partly fiction
Taking ever wrong directions on his lonely way back home”

Gin
Gin
Dec 13, 2020 1:17 PM
Reply to  Gin

“While the world keeps on a-changin’ for the better or the worse
All He ever gets is older and around,
From the rocking of the cradle to the rolling of the hearse
The goin’ up was worth the comin’ down”

Jess
Jess
Dec 13, 2020 11:38 AM

The UK is going from being an integrated member state negotiating a good exit, to a ‘third country’ trying to get access to the EU markets. A big downgrade. The Brattish leadership just lost all their leverage.

el Gallinazo
el Gallinazo
Dec 13, 2020 2:28 PM
Reply to  Jess

If Brexit represented a break for freedom of the UK people to be released from the tyranny of the EUSSR, it would certainly be worth some economic hardship during the transition. But the economic hardship and economic collapse of the scamdemic lockdowns dwarf any which might result from Brexit. And we are only in the bottom of the first inning of these hardships. The ruling elitist traitors of the UK, including BoZo, have proven themselves through their actions to be every bit as malevolent as the EU politburo. I now see Brexit as a transition stage moving the UK into Oceania as separate from and at intermittent war with Eurasia. But if Brexit had not been subverted, it would have been a mandatory first step to a free society.

peter
peter
Dec 13, 2020 5:12 PM
Reply to  Jess

Not just a member but one of the main players with veto, it’s own currency and not subject to Schengen. Not so now when we have to rejoin; if we fully leave. My prediction?

The posh oaf will tell the EU (in cod Latin no less such is the exceptional brilliance of the man) that the UK needs to extend transitional negotiations therefore needing an extension into next summer, or longer taking it to the end of 2021. This being useful for Macron and his election campaign, hence all the muscluar posturing at the moment; those Davos and Bilderberg meetings are more than just drinking the blood of the innocent, eh!

At which time they will begin to formulate the need to offer the people a say on this current situation (as it will be 4+ years on, covid etc.) they may call it a referendum or people’s say or something else and then go to work making sure the right result is returned or just re-enact the great fraud as was December 2019, also witnessed in the USA presently, “Build Back Better”, great lines. Or just renege and call emergency measures as the economy will have tanked by then and the endless news reports rolling that will be the disaster on the M20 all through Kent, port of Dover into Calais and the coming squeeze on all our living standards, particularly certain food shortages. Creating an anxiety and general fear in the population.

Bozo the clown will be gone before then and afterall that Durham shithead Cummings has already walked before this deadline, of course for other reasons, my arse. Which should tell us all we need to know. Another tell is sterling is almost equal with the euro and after the latest largesse with the currency the UK maybe in a position to go back in a weaker member than would be imagined resulting in lower membership fees, hence Sunak’s great give away. £2+ trillion debt, unhealthy deficit and a credit rating similar to Zimbabwe.

Good olde Gideon, another blood drinker. No AAA credit rating any more. Which may allow these people to raid the nation’s Larder once again when EU emergency funding is needed for an economic disaster zone that will be the UK, or maybe just England by then.
A creation from the political party for business and union of nations, FFS. Or is the new mantra “Fuck Business, Fuck Wales, Fuck Scotland, Fuck Northern Ireland”; maybe? Unbelievable. I suppose these tory types that voted for them need to pay their mortgage and collect their dividends, or they’re just right into BDSM as the bitch. Dunno. Either way the Tories will take a huge hit from this. At least they have castrated the main opposition and nullified that threat.

A plague on all their houses!

God
God
Dec 13, 2020 11:33 AM

No Brexit coverage here? Why.

ity
ity
Dec 13, 2020 2:49 PM
Reply to  God

What’s to be said at this moment in time? All we can do is watch in horror as the disaster unfolds. Yet another running commentary wouldn’t be of much use.

Thom
Thom
Dec 13, 2020 11:19 AM

It seems to be ‘aiming off’ weekend at OffG, given Brexit bubbling over and the worsening crisis in the US (manufactured or otherwise). I don’t disagree with this piece but it could surely wait for a quieter news day?

Nottheonly1
Nottheonly1
Dec 13, 2020 11:49 AM
Reply to  Thom

…wait for a quieter news day?

After the reset?

Arsebiscuits
Arsebiscuits
Dec 13, 2020 1:12 PM
Reply to  Nottheonly1

My brain needs a reset

Nottheonly1
Nottheonly1
Dec 13, 2020 3:43 PM
Reply to  Arsebiscuits

You are not the only one, if I may say so. With no reserves on this side of life.

ity
ity
Dec 13, 2020 12:29 PM
Reply to  Thom

Thom, we all need some hope and light at times, and especially so during the hard times. There is plenty of page space here at OffG.

On a slightly personal and melancholic note, a few weeks ago on this site someone quoted the great Leonard Cohen’s song ‘Everybody Knows’, and since then I have been haunted on a daily basis by these four lines;

Everybody knows that the boat is leaking
Everybody knows that the captain lied
Everybody got this broken feeling
Like their father or their dog just died

Art is indeed a powerful and wonderful thing. There is healing and growth through sadness.

Joerg
Joerg
Dec 13, 2020 1:59 PM
Reply to  Thom

I agree with Thom. 
The US election, for example, is a real thriller. But the last article on OffG about this election was “US Election: A Color Revolution ‘Comes Home to Roost’” from Nov 26th, 2020.
Thats more than 2 weeks ago.

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Dec 13, 2020 5:50 PM
Reply to  Joerg

Agreed. People who think the U.S. will sail through this unscathed should at least check their assumptions.

This is a huge historical event and the media, “the first draft of history” is oblivious.

-CO
-CO
Dec 13, 2020 11:06 AM

According to Cathy O,Brien and Fritz Springmeier Kristofferson was a programmer in the CIA’s MKUltra Monarch trauma based mind control programme. No mention of that in Edward’s article. Seems far fetched but if you do the research there is stuff that tends to support the claim.

Seansaighdeor
Seansaighdeor
Dec 13, 2020 11:15 AM
Reply to  -CO

There has been talk of Kristofferson’s involvement in MK Ultra for years but it seems to have escaped analysis in this piece. Really puzzled by this piece especially in the light of all that is happening particularly the EU and the msm scaremongering.

nrrman
nrrman
Dec 13, 2020 12:57 PM
Reply to  Seansaighdeor

check out the movie the jacket
dr kris stores folks in filing cabinets
adrian brodey and kierra knightly
tavistock agent army ranger rhodes scholar

rhodes scholar

and handler weangler

as for cohen and zimmerman

twisted world of zion
enough already

my how he has aged
he looked so young in heavens gate
no heaven for this one
he made his pact long ago
signed sealed delivered

-CO
-CO
Dec 13, 2020 1:50 PM
Reply to  Seansaighdeor

Hi Sean
Fritz Springmeier wrote three volumes on MK Ultra Monarch trauma based mind control and Catherine O’brien was a presidential mind controlled slave. She was eventually deprogrammed by Mark Philips. Her young daughter Kelly was also programmed too. It’s a long story and Kris Kristofferson is named and shamed. All the sordid details is recoded in the book Trance Formation of America and contains copies of official documents.

Seansaighdeor
Seansaighdeor
Dec 13, 2020 2:28 PM
Reply to  -CO

CO thanks I am familiar with Cathy O’Briens testimony and Trance Formation and there is (was?) quite alot of her work on YT where she exposes this.

I am not so much familiar with the work of Springmeier though so thanks I will look into that.

-CO
-CO
Dec 13, 2020 2:56 PM
Reply to  Seansaighdeor

If you search Fritz Springmeier pdf his books are available free access.

Seansaighdeor
Seansaighdeor
Dec 13, 2020 5:07 PM
Reply to  -CO

Cheers C

Steven Augustine
Steven Augustine
Dec 14, 2020 9:25 PM
Reply to  -CO

“According to Cathy O’Brien…”

Click.

“Hello? Hello…? Are you still there…?”

Nottheonly1
Nottheonly1
Dec 13, 2020 10:32 AM

Kris Kristofferson is not only a great poet, songwriter and performer. He is also a great actor – as the combined talents and artistic skills provide an extraordinary blend to portray any person in a most amazing fashion. If hollywood would not have become what it did, there would be more great films with Kris in it. Cherished are those he blessed with his participation.

There is another important aspect in Kris Kristofferson’s life: Friendship. Seldom have I noticed such powerful bonds to like minded artists. Without ever having had the chance to experience both great men live, the friendship between Kris Kristofferson and Johnny Cash has to be one of the most inspiring bonds between two very special human beings. How I wish to could have been a mouse watching the two together in private.

Here is one of the greatest concerts that reflects this lifelong friendship.

Johnny Cash – The first 25 years

Who would not love to have a friend that lands with an old helicopter in your yard?
Blessed beings like Kris and Johnny make suffering so much more bearable – knowing that they too, had enough joy and pain to go around forever.

Thank you for this lovely hommage to a truly exceptional human being.

Jacques
Jacques
Dec 13, 2020 11:17 AM
Reply to  Nottheonly1

I guess …

Nottheonly1
Nottheonly1
Dec 13, 2020 1:18 PM
Reply to  Jacques

Of course one cannot know what Kris was whispering in Shinnead’s ears, but the two. But to give any artist free choice at introduction is remarkable to say the least. While not all inclusive, Bob Marley’s anthem was a great choice. It created silence and awe for this then unknown singer.

Hector
Hector
Dec 13, 2020 10:18 AM

David Icke thought (still thinks?) that Kristofferson is one of the “lizard people”?

Make of that what you will.

Nottheonly1
Nottheonly1
Dec 13, 2020 10:37 AM
Reply to  Hector

Pure psychological projection…

From Far Away
From Far Away
Dec 13, 2020 12:20 PM
Reply to  Hector

[David Icke thought (still thinks?) that Kristofferson is one of the “lizard people”?]

Clearly then David Icke is a “gatekeeper” and “controlled opposition” for the “lizard people!”

Ergo, David Icke is guilty as sin. The greedy, evil, satanic, monstrous left-wing / right-wing (choose your preferred enemy) is likely funding him as part of their well-orchestrated, nefarious plans. Do not trust him.

There. No quibbling with the “truth” I have just “explained” to everyone. If you disagree with me, then you are surely a “troll.” Or even worse, a serial “downvoter!”

PS. Obviously my “arguing” above deliberately mimics the way a few commenters here tend to “argue.” Thankfully however, they are a far cry from all! So at the same time, my appreciation to the many reasoned commenters here.

-CO
-CO
Dec 13, 2020 2:41 PM
Reply to  From Far Away

Are you suggesting that Dvid Icke has been programmed in some form and is an intelligence asset or a disinformation agent for the dark forces?

Jungblud
Jungblud
Dec 13, 2020 4:15 PM
Reply to  -CO

the dudes first job was at bbc. my spidey sense tells me he’s a double agent mi6 assassin,recruited in the 80’s. Re-assigned with the duties of establishing a following with some truths to lead astray, since he had a massive mushroom addiction which lead to many unsanctioned hits.

-CO
-CO
Dec 13, 2020 6:26 PM
Reply to  Jungblud

Ha! He’d have a hard job at being a “double agent MI6 assassin” with his arthritis.

As for truths leading us astray when push comes to shove for the most part he does the reverse.

I don’t know where you got the “mushroom addiction” idea from, although I do believe he had an experience with the traditional spiritual medicine known as Ayahuasca which is a potent psychotropic used in shamanism.

George Mc
George Mc
Dec 13, 2020 1:51 PM
Reply to  Hector

One of DI’s more arbitrary pronouncements. Didn’t he also suspect Madonna? I’m guessing that in each case he was in a bad mood and just happened to see images of them. And then made one of his “mystical” connections.

-CO
-CO
Dec 13, 2020 3:11 PM
Reply to  George Mc

That can only happen as far as we know George if the person in question has either been programmed or is psychotic and as far as Madonna is concerned also participates in some form of dark sex magic!

-CO
-CO
Dec 13, 2020 2:13 PM
Reply to  Hector

I think David Icke got that idea from MK Ultra’s so-called “Lizard Programming” theme which creates the shapeshifting illusion in the consciousness of one of the slave’s alter personalities.

The trauma used in programming is so severe that it creates dissociation and alter personalities in the slave are produced. Another infamous programming theme is the Wizard of Oz whereby specific alters can be accessed for a variety of different purposes e.g. Intel or sex.

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Dec 13, 2020 8:45 AM

Art is entwined with criticism: of the world as it is and as it should be.

So let’s recognize the artistic truth of 19-year-old Fatemeh Khishvand, as she faces a decade in jail in Tehran for “promoting public corruption” for mocking UN goodwill ambassador Angelina Jolie.

Whatever point Fatemeh was making, the target is deserving. Jolie has been directly involved with spreading polio through Bill Gates’ polio vaccine in Sudan and Chad. While the public relations “fact checkers” are out in force misleading the masses, the WHO has admitted there’s an issue.

Jacques
Jacques
Dec 13, 2020 7:33 AM

Good article. Not necessarily because of how it puts Kristofferson on a pedestal, as much as he might deserve it, but because it leads to a bigger issue.

The importance of art as such.

The artist is the person who gazes beyond the horizon, proposes new ways of life, new prisms through which to look at things, new avenues. Art is the opposite of the status quo, it drives progress, it keeps people’s eyes open, it prevents them from becoming sleepy zombies. The artist has an open mind, lives outside the realm of the ordinary, leads the way in proposing new directions where the world could be headed. Technologies only come after that – engineers take the artist’s bold ideas and transform them into reality.

It no longer works like that in today’s world. More often than not, art is equated with entertainment, catering to the rather putrefied taste of the random consumer. Kitsch par excellence. Classical, savant art is pretty much dead, popular art having taken over, which would be to some extent okay, but there has been essentially no new art for some four decades. Shit has been recycled over and fucking over. With all due respect to Kristofferson, the man is over 80. Not that he doesn’t have anything to say, but where are the Kristoffersons d’aujour’dhui? Nowhere to be found and the occasional artists who has something to say only confirms the sad reality.

Our culture is empty, stale, devoid of art, and therefore rotting, imploding, collapsing, disappearing down the tubes.

The world is driven by technocrats, technologists, people whose imagination only encompasses technical shit, as opposed to the inner world, which is where life happens.

Not surprisingly, these motherfuckers are now outdoing themselves to destroy whatever culture there might be left in the world – all forms of performing art are in the state of clinical death right now, probably for good. Well, art – what sort of fucking artists are the entertainers of today anyway, since just about all of them – including those who have built their career (quite oxymoronic in reference to an artist – an artist shouldn’t have a career, an artist should be true to his/her art, not aspire to make money out of it) on a rebellious image – have kept their mouth shut and tail between their legs.

Anyway, the world won’t be better before new, true artists rise from the ashes of the cultural ruins which the world has become and show others the way to new tomorrows.

From Far Away
From Far Away
Dec 13, 2020 12:46 PM
Reply to  Jacques

[The artist is the person who gazes beyond the horizon, proposes new ways of life, new prisms through which to look at things, new avenues.]

You use a definite determiner, namely “the.” The logical conclusion that is immediately derived is that non-artists do not also perform the above actions.

Frankly, that is not true.

[Our culture is empty, stale, devoid of art, and therefore rotting, imploding, collapsing, disappearing down the tubes.]

“Devoid of art?” I suggest you tone down on the hyperbole. I have personally encountered some lovely NEW art just this week.

[The world is driven by technocrats, technologists, people whose imagination only encompasses technical shit…]

No, the world is not driven by them. In my country, the drive originating from technocrats, technologists, and the like does not match up to the politicians, academics, and the so-called “thought leaders” and “social influencers.” And I leave you free to imagine what politicians imagine. Their imagination encompasses much political shit (to use your turn of phrase).

PS. The evocative yet fallacious hyperbolic and over-generalising style is making it very difficult for me to discern the actual truth in your comment. I am, however, quite sure that you will get many upvotes from those to whom the provided emotional rhetoric appeals (as I may get downvotes). Sadly, we humans do tend to suppress our critical analysis when the message we receive is loaded with layers upon layers of incorrect, but emotionally stirring, phrases.

PPS. I love beautiful art and appreciate artists.

PPPS. Your technique of rhetoric also brought a smile (somewhat wry) to my face.

Jacques
Jacques
Dec 13, 2020 2:43 PM
Reply to  From Far Away

Your allusion that one’s motivation is to get upvotes indicates to me that you must be so fucked up in the head by the likes of Facebook that you can’t fathom that a person simply writes something to express an opinion, to provoke a debate, or for a number of other reasons.

You encountered “lovely new art” (sic)? What was it, a lovely Mickey Mouse statue on somebody’s front lawn? Do you have a concept for such terms as art, entertainment, kitsch? Art vs. craft?

I doubt that you’ve encountered “new art”. What the adjective “lovely” is supposed to mean, I know not. Art is not supposed to be (primarily) lovely. Art is supposed to a) propose a technical innovation in the applicable artistic field, b) exhibit perfection of execution, c) convey an abstract value that can be emotional but also intellectually provocative. Lovely doesn’t enter into that. Most of the stuff people like you consider art is entertainment, kitsch, or popular art. Wherewith there is nothing wrong with, except that – safe for some forms of popular art, such as Kristofferson’s – it’s not conducive to progress or even maintenance of culture per se. It would behoove you to acquire some basic knowledge of this.

You might be right that technologists are not the only people who are setting the course of where society is going, but it is “technology” in the broader sense that is the defining factor.

There has been no new artistic movement, style to speak of for decades. In the art I happen to practice, the last major movement happened sometime in the 1980s and it was already a rehash of an earlier style. The world has been recycling itself since that decade. Regardless of whether you’re able to perceive it.

Whatever your country is, it’s the same all over the world.

We live in a world that gravitates toward conventions. Faster and faster. Sameness is omnipresent. Products look the same (where are such bold designs as the Citroen). Clothes look the same. People look the same. Everything is the same. People’s thoughts are the same. Status quo, conventions are God. Now people will have a digital leash shoved up their ass and all of this will be further exacerbated.

Yeah, you’ve seen some “lovely art” …. give me a break …

You don’t like the way I write, don’t read it. You’re probably want me to say the same thing as everybody else is saying, use the same officially approved style. Fuck that. I consider it my prerogative to preserve my individuality. Whether you or anyone else likes it or not.

-CO
-CO
Dec 13, 2020 4:28 PM
Reply to  Jacques

Thank you Jacques for bringing a smile to my face on this dark and dismal day. There are some who view the world and art forms through rose tinted spectacles no matter what crap is produced and you do not appear to be one of them judging by your reply to From Far Away. However, they do say that beauty is in the eye of the beholder maybe that goes for art too!

Grafter
Grafter
Dec 13, 2020 5:48 PM
Reply to  -CO

“beauty is in the eye of the beholder”

 Wrong. In relation to the visual arts, that premise is flawed. Your average “beholder” today is a sorely dumbed down consumer whose critical faculties produce statements such as “lovely art” which is in your case, endorsed by your superficial comment. This downward trend results, as Jacques has stressed, in a plethora of rehashed, recycled ideas posing as “new and innovative” but are in reality, mundane and sterile. Would be obliged if you could post a link to what you consider to be “lovely art”.

-CO
-CO
Dec 13, 2020 7:04 PM
Reply to  Grafter

Where art is concerned dear Grafter there is no right or wrong interpretation all is relative and subjective and to a certain extent culture bound through our social conditioning. So why the hysterical attack on something you misinterpreted that coming from me? After all that’s subjective too is in not?

I said “THEY say that beauty is in the eye of the beholder and maybe that goes for art too”. Before you jumped in all guns firing it would have been better if you had looked up the meanings of that phrase. One is that the perception of beauty is subjective – what one finds beautiful another may not. That’s it. No reference was made by me to “lovely art”😍

Grafter
Grafter
Dec 13, 2020 8:33 PM
Reply to  -CO

Let’s see the link to what you term “lovely art”.

Grafter
Grafter
Dec 13, 2020 8:38 PM
Reply to  -CO

Correction. “lovely New art” was what you said. Am waiting .

-CO
-CO
Dec 13, 2020 11:52 PM
Reply to  Grafter

Are you sure that you are addressing the right person here for that comment namely, ” lovely new art” for there is nothing in my comment – s to Jacques or to you that ever mentions those words!! So you will be waiting in vain for a link to a non existent comment that was never made by me in the first place – period.

Howard
Howard
Dec 13, 2020 1:37 PM
Reply to  Jacques

Thank you for this much needed counterpoint to the strange idea that Art flourishes throughout the world because of the largesse of “the Medium.” I won’t carry my view to the next level and say “If people are aware of it, it cannot by definition be Art.” But I will go so far as to say that Art, like everything else, is cyclical.

I’ve noticed that, even in the Pop Music field, the “Greats” are all pushing 80. I don’t think this is mere coincidence; nor do I think it’s because the music industry has become crasser than it was, say, 50 years ago. I think those born of chaos (such as the chaos of a World War) possess a greater need to understand existence and create something transcendent.

Long ago, in college, I remember hearing or reading that someone had made a kind of chronology of philosophers; and had discerned a correlation between significant historical events and “great” philosophers. The same can almost certainly be said of “great” artists.

Grafter
Grafter
Dec 13, 2020 10:29 PM
Reply to  Howard

Agree with that.

Jacques
Jacques
Dec 14, 2020 4:20 PM
Reply to  Howard

Action generates reaction. Tension, of whatever nature, prompts people to respond, the artist to create.

Abundance, welfare don’t do that. People have had it – thanks to artists, philosophers, others – good for a long time, engaging in gluttonous consumption, living off past achievements.

Now, it’s coming to an end. Our culture is driven by stuff created decades if not centuries ago. Our world is an empty shell, a mirage of what things once were (sort of) and what the PTBs want us to believe in an effort to sell is yet another useless piece of shit before this circus comes down like a house of cards.

Howard
Howard
Dec 14, 2020 5:25 PM
Reply to  Jacques

Unfortunately, the patronage system of the Age of Enlightenment all but assured today’s non-culture in that the “common man” was largely excluded from the higher reaches of culture.

To me, the truly great irony resides in classical music. Many classical compositions were based on folk tunes which, basically, sprang from ordinary people – yet these were the very people virtually excluded from participation.

Granted, logistics played a huge part in this exclusion: symphonies simply could not have been orchestrated in, say, settings such as the Globe Theatre. But I think patronage played a far greater part. I cannot conceive of princes and other titled nobility (and, later on, commercial tycoons) wishing to open their palaces to the common man (and symphony halls were basically palaces away from the palace).

Societies, like people, get what they pay for. A little Beethoven in the 18th century might have helped keep the Kardashians at bay a little longer.

Jacques
Jacques
Dec 15, 2020 2:09 PM
Reply to  Howard

I don’t know if you can say that many classical compositions were based on folk tunes? Which ones?

I mean, you can probably find some melodic similarities in between classical and folk music, but saying that classical music is based on folk tunes is not based in reality.

Moreover, most classical works don’t revolve around tune – they employ many melodies, contrapuntal structures, extended harmonies (folk tunes are mostly based on the ol’ I-[IV]-V or something similarly rudimentary in the era preceding tonal music), and extended forms.

You’re to a large extent right about aristocracy being the owners of the arts.

Today, the arts, as per the classical definition, don’t have an owner (they’re mostly owned by the academia and are therefore -surprise surprise – academic). Instead, we have popular art, but much of it is entertainment or kitsch, unable to drive progress.

Howard
Howard
Dec 15, 2020 3:21 PM
Reply to  Jacques

What comes immediately to mind is Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 5 (Reformation Symphony). This is one of my very favorite classical pieces.

The fourth movement is based on Martin Luther‘s choraleEin feste Burg ist unser Gott” (“A mighty fortress is our God”). Sorry, this info is copied directly from Wikipedia, which I hate to use as a reference (talk about kitsch!). It’s also a bit of a stretch to suggest something by Martin Luther is analogous to a folk tune.

I would suggest, however, that complexity in and of itself doesn’t negate basic similarities. And, of course, themes certain composers use occur in their own songs as well as their more serious works (Brahms comes to mind here).

Jacques
Jacques
Dec 16, 2020 2:18 PM
Reply to  Howard

Well, to be honest, I don’t know the body of classical music that well. A good deal of my knowledge of classical compositions comes from (excruciatingly hard) harmony analysis classes, but I’m a jazz musician and ethnomusicologist, so …

Marilyn Shepherd
Marilyn Shepherd
Dec 13, 2020 7:00 AM

I fell in love with Kris and his music when I was 15 and country music had been made popular by that other great, great man Johnny Cash.

Shin
Shin
Dec 13, 2020 8:22 AM

Lets not forget Townes Van Zandt!

-CO
-CO
Dec 13, 2020 3:46 PM

Perhaps your love for him will not be as ardent after you read what he did to Catherine O’brien and it might take the shine of his music too.

MaryLS
MaryLS
Dec 14, 2020 5:41 AM
Reply to  -CO

Well, what did he do? Could not find anything on this.

Jeff Carmack
Jeff Carmack
Dec 13, 2020 6:25 AM

There is a threshold of public exposure for all people that once met corrupts regardless of circumstance or “purity.”

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Dec 13, 2020 5:35 AM

An uplifting article full of William Blake. What better way to start the day.

Not to put a damper on it but because it is authentic, here is a contemporaneous recording of “We’re Here Because We’re Here”.

It’s by one of those World War One Tommies who sang in the trenches, Corporal Edward Dwyer VC, recorded in France on August 11, 1916, less than a month before he was killed in action at the age of 20.