116

Communing with Camus in 2022

Edward Curtin

Albert Camus, Michel y Jeannine Gallimard by Antonio Marín Segovia (source)

The person with whom we are all most intimate is oneself. It’s just the way it is. I don’t mean that in some oracular Delphic “know thyself” way, or in any deep psychoanalytical sense, but very simply.

We have our own thoughts and feelings that come and go like breaths, most of which never get expressed in words.

Together with our actions, including speech, they make up our lives. We try to anchor them with photos and memorabilia and lots of things, but time has no mercy; it sweeps us all away.

Then our things remain for a while until they become a burden to those who remain, and then the things go. As the song reminds us, “We come and go like a ripple on a stream.”

For most people, their congeries of living experiences evaporate as quickly as soap bubbles in a pan of dish water. This is also true for the social and personal facts of our lives that leave but vague traces.

…Yet some strange people record them. They are a small minority, writers being chief among them. They keep words. Words unspoken and spoken words.

I have kept notebooks since my mid-twenties. They sit in cartons in a closet. They were at first my imaginary friends who never responded. Maybe I didn’t want them to. They are still silent, although every once in a while I seem to hear inarticulate sounds coming from the boxes.

I usually give them my ear at the end of each year when I read my notebook for the previous year. I then extract any entries that I have not yet used in my writing and put them in a small writing project notebook. But this year it was very strange.

There was only one entry for 2021: “It’s all lies.” Those words keep echoing in my mind.

Most years I encounter many things that I have forgotten: a scene I saw and recorded; a snatch of conversation overheard; thoughts and musings; little paragraphs that I write that I might use later; feelings and emotions; questions; notes for future writing projects; things I did, people I met, books I read; events both personal and social that seem significant – almost anything that comes to mind.

I have a love/hate relationship with these jottings, for I know that when I am dead, few, if any, people will care to read them. Why should they? I don’t, except once at the end of each year.

For some strange reason I feel that if I burn the lot of them, the real me might disappear. But I also don’t really believe that, for I know I am not in those boxes. But I keep writing to myself nevertheless and then shut those words up.

“It’s all lies” concisely summed up my private disgust throughout 2020-21. I had tried in my public writing to expose those lies while having no energy or inclination left to write to or for myself.

The past two years have been so absurd, the Covid propaganda so all-consuming, its madness so disturbing as so many people have gone off the deep end believing such outlandish garbage, that to contemplate this madness any more than I was already doing publicly must have seemed…I don’t know what.

All I know is that I didn’t. I could only take so much.

Anyway, to start this year, having read my three words for 2021, I turned to reading the notebooks of my companion since my early twenties, Albert Camus.

He too kept notebooks – cahiers – from the age of twenty-two until his strange death in a car crash – accident or assassination? – on January 4, 1960, a few months after his forty-sixth birthday, the age my daughter will reach this month.

Camus was born in 1913, the same year as my father. These facts may be significant. I am writing this on January 4, 2022.

Brother Albert had always striven to serve both justice and beauty; to find a way to oppose a world of lies while living fully.

I have recently concluded that many people who accept or oppose the vast tapestry of lies within which we now exist, the closing down of freedom and the rise of a new totalitarianism, have in a strange way unknowingly embraced a trick of the propagandists: they have become so one-dimensional in their obsessive need to defend or oppose their positions that they have forgotten to relish life.

One side lives in perpetual fear of disease and death and has turned into obedient and vengeful children wanting to ban the dissidents from society or burn them at the stake.

The other side, flabbergasted at the credulous behavior of the compliant ones in the face of so many official lies and contradictions, feels compelled – and rightly so – to resist at every turn the gradual slide into a digital dystopian totalitarianism.

But emotions are so raw and twisted that they flip at the drop of a pin. Or are flipped. This is how great propaganda works.

For those behind the COVID hoax, Russia-gate, etc. want all the peons to hate life itself and embrace their dark and evil nihilism. To forget that life is both beautiful and tragic. To cut each other to pieces.

The journalist Andre Vltchek used to remind us, as he traveled the world reporting on the empire’s atrocities, that to dispense with poetry and song and passion is to succumb to evil; it is to forget that true revolution demands art as well as politics, the best expressions of the human spirit.

For years before his untimely death in 2020, he noted how a grim sense of joylessness and indifference had descended on so many western countries, especially those, led by the United States, which cause so much human misery throughout the world.

And he reminded us repeatedly, that throughout the world where people are oppressed, the spirit of resistance is preserved in remembering the great and beautiful poetry and music of their countries’ artists, whose words regular people have memorized and celebrate for their beauty and joie de vivre – despite oppressive conditions.

Speaking for himself, in a moving essay, Return to Tipasa, Camus wrote:

To give up beauty and the sensual happiness that comes with it and devote one’s self exclusively to unhappiness requires a nobility I lack…isolate beauty ends in grimaces, solitary justice in oppression. Anyone who seeks to serve the one to the exclusion of the other serves no one, not even himself, and in the end is doubly the servant of injustice.

So I have turned to Camus’ notebooks to see if I might fill in some gaps and learn some lessons for 2022.

On May 5, 1935 Camus made his first entry. Here is the opening sentence:

What I mean is this: that one can, with no romanticism, feel nostalgic for lost poverty.

That can be easily misunderstood, but he clarifies it. For Camus grew up in poverty but under the sun and by the sea in Algeria where he found beauty and joy in nature. He knew there was a grey, depressing form of poverty that did not provide such solace.

He was trying at a young age to express what he later said differently: “I cling like a miser to the freedom that disappears as soon as there is an excess of things.”

Yet here we are in 2022 drowning in an excess of things, possessions that keep the world captive to the evil genius of consumer capitalism and the false rhetoric of freedom, things that people don’t need but want because of advertising’s brainwashing and the existential emptiness that convinces people that if you surround yourself with enough things you are somehow protecting yourself, while that delusion feeds an environmental crisis that is destroying the earth.

Possessions as a form of demonic possession, a protection racket that doesn’t protect. But they give people an imaginary boost. Call them boosters. See the front page of The New York Times for all the latest consumer goods no one needs. They call it news, and the boosters, booster shots.

April 1937:

In the evening, the gentleness of the world on the bay. There are days when the world lies, days when it tells the truth. It is telling the truth this evening – with what sad and insistent beauty.

Yes, this has always been so, but it is terrifying and exhilarating. Living in constant fear as so many are now doing blocks both the sun and the clouds and reduces life to a caricature of its possibilities. All the official lies have produced passionless people afraid of themselves and others.

April 1941:

It is always a great crime to deprive people of its liberty on the pretext that it is using it wrongly.” (Tocqueville)

Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose. When Camus wrote this, Germany was occupying France and the French Resistance was born. These days so many minds are occupied by endless propaganda that penetrates to the primal emotions and reduces carnal truth to digital abstractions.

I think we will lose our freedom if we continue to embrace digital technology. Resistance is necessary.

August 1942:

Novel. Don’t put the “plague” in the title. Put something like “The Prisoners.”

He instinctively knew that is was not a plague that imprisons people but the mind-forged manacles of those who are afraid to confront it. Those who lack the courage to see the truth and resist it. To collaborate with the Nazis was for cowards. Free people fight back.

As editor of Combat, the banned newspaper, he knew that when voices were censored it was because the censors were afraid the truth would prevail. A good lesson for 2022.

October 1946:

What makes a man feel alone is the cowardice of others. Must one try to understand that cowardice too? But it’s beyond my strength. And, on the other hand, I cannot be a scorner.

Ditto.

September 1949:

One must love life before loving its meaning, Dostoevsky says. Yes, and when the love of life disappears, no meaning consoles us for it.

Even depression is good. Even confronting evil is good. Even arguing. Pleasure is good. It’s all good. Life is an agon, always conflictual and agreeable.

We were born to love and fight and try always to make the fight a loving fight. Words are our best weapons. I have always enjoyed writing them, for they always have seemed to be like wild birds in my breast, struggling to leave the nest. They are always taking us somewhere. Where is the question. Or better yet: Where do we want to go?

February 1950:

Later write an essay, without hesitation or reservation, on what I know to be true. (Do what one doesn’t want, want what one doesn’t do.)

What was that? I think he never wrote the essay but left us with his beautiful, unfinished novel, The First Man, wherein he wrote without hesitation or reservation and opened his heart. His was an unfinished life. I wonder if that is true for all of us.

June 1951:

Man of 1950. He fornicated and read the newspapers.

Sort of still right. 2022: They masturbated and checked their cell phones. Call it transhumanism. What’s love got to do with it?

February 1953:

Two common errors: existence precedes essence or essence existence. Both rise and fall with the same step.

So the sagacious intellectuals ripped him for this. Subtleties of thought always escape them. Today’s common errors: Obama differs from Trump or Trump differs from Obama (Biden).

I once thought I was an intellectual until I understood their thinking. Small minds looking through the wrong ends of their binoculars.

May 1954:

Play. A happy man. And nobody can put up with him.

So what is happiness? There are those who think that it consists of having “fun.” They cannot understand the joy of struggle, the artist’s efforts to give form to chaos. One can only live if one is drunk with life, Tolstoy said. And he spent a bit of his life writing.

Was he happy? Of happiness and despair we have no measure.

November 1, 1954:

I often read that I am atheistic. I hear people speak of my atheism. Yet these words say nothing to me; for me they have no meaning. I do not believe in God and I am not an atheist.

I do believe in God and yet one of my sisters years ago said to me that “I thought you were an atheist.” This shocked me.

Camus too was shocked by the meaningless of such terms. He knew there was a sharp distinction between the heart and the head and that belief and faith were not the same thing. Only the living-dead cannot distinguish them. Faith guides me.

Camus, too, was led by an invisible star; he said it differently: “In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer.” The current age denies the invisible and promotes defeatism.

July 1, 1958 (his last notebook entry):

The lie lulls or dreams, like the illusion. The truth is the only power, cheerful, inexhaustible. If we were able to live only of, and for truth: young and immortal energy in us. The man of truth does not age. A little more effort and he will not die.

How to say it when “It’s all lies”? Keep trying, and try to make it beautiful. Only the artistic imagination can accomplish this.

As you said, Albert: “Beauty never enslaved anyone…And for thousands of years, every day, at every second, it has instead assuaged the servitude of millions of men and, occasionally, liberated some of them once and for all. After all, perhaps the greatness of art lies in the perpetual tension between beauty and pain, the love of men and the madness of creation, unbearable solitude and the exhausting crowd, rejection and consent. Art advances between two chasms, which are frivolity and propaganda.”

Create dangerously indeed, you advised!

For we are in the heat of combat.

Let us rejoice and fight on.

Edward Curtin is an independent writer whose work has appeared widely over many years. His website is edwardcurtin.com and his new book is Seeking Truth in a Country of Lies.

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script
script
Jan 19, 2022 9:49 PM

JFK Revisited was great read Ed

Platov
Platov
Jan 17, 2022 6:44 AM

Living in a full and true sense invariably means taking risks. It takes some courage to overcome the anxiety or fear that such risks entail. The Covidian believers are a fearful lot willing to do anything to feel safe and secure, so their fundamental flaw is that they are cowards devoid of any principle. They cling to the Covid hoax despite the obvious lies and contradictions because of their pathological fearfulness. They hate those who do have the courage to resist because they regard it as an attack on themselves, exposing their cowardice and unthinking submissiveness.

rubberheid
rubberheid
Jan 16, 2022 10:21 PM

shut the fuck up and act. actually, instead of wordplay, god i am sick of patter. get om the streets and fight you fukn cunts!!!

siamdave
siamdave
Jan 17, 2022 3:14 AM
Reply to  rubberheid

right, just what the ruling predators want, return to the jungle, where their natural predilection to deceit and violence will ever carry the day for them. we will never win a revolution based on violence, that just changes one set of predators for another. we will certainly need to be familiar with violence at some time, and dominant in our use of it, as the jujitsu master uses minimal force to subdue a violent opponent, as these dogs will surely bare their teeth and refuse to leave the manger and need to be driven out, but it will need to be democratic and controlled and minimal-necessary violence. The first Mr Roosevelt had the right idea for democracy – speak softly, but carry a big stick.

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 17, 2022 9:30 AM
Reply to  siamdave

Just a bit earlier, I said some things.

https://frankgl.substack.com/p/i-propose-a-new-electoral-system

rubberheid
rubberheid
Jan 17, 2022 6:40 PM
Reply to  siamdave

aye, agreed. i get very frustrated at general inaction and i think those who decry violence will find themselves clubbed senseless, at least, sooner or later.

self defense is entirely entitled, but you are right that we do not initiate “violence”.

was drunken rant ; )

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 17, 2022 6:41 PM
Reply to  rubberheid

If you support supposed government (capitalist state or state capitalism), you delegate your rights away and you lose.

Howard
Howard
Jan 17, 2022 3:36 AM
Reply to  rubberheid

There is an expression: An Idea Whose Time Has Come. It’s more than just a clever word salad; it points to one of the greatest truths of human existence: that all actions which affect societies come from Ideas, not from physical acts.

You can choose to go flailing about or you can choose to present an Idea with which to counter prevailing Ideas and attitudes. Choose the former, and nothing will change; choose the latter, and there’s a chance things will change.

rubberheid
rubberheid
Jan 17, 2022 6:52 PM
Reply to  Howard

no, it is word salad:
I think our current society is far too fucking fukt to be presenting nice ideas that will mean anything, currently.

Further, can you imagine trying to form a people’s “govt” or whatever, with even half the people on OG never mind wider society? really, go have a look at how ever-so-slightly-differing-ideas/perception/understanding causes the good people of OG to spit and hiss at each other….

i am very well known for excellent ideas and understanding, problem solving… especially by the predatory cnts at large who use it all up and never give any credit, even shekel in acknowledgement. ideas don’t win anything, “power” does.

Howard, whilst i am handy and never feart, i do not go flailing around. But I am very scunnert of cowardly people who never act decisively and have brought society to this repugnant roiling shitehole of today.

Howard
Howard
Jan 17, 2022 10:49 PM
Reply to  rubberheid

Who said anything about “nice ideas?” But yes, you’re right, ideas generally take a generation or generations to come to fruition. They do little good in the here and now.

So where are the ideas we can use now? Well, it appears nobody bothered anticipating the mess we’re in so nobody bothered coming up with any ideas.

This is why artists are the primary source of ideas whose “time has come.” Political pundits are too busy with the here and now to foresee what’s to come. And revolutionaries are too busy plotting how to take over societies to observe where current social trends may lead.

The first parent who accepted the “necessity” of letting the government dictate their child’s health and vaccination status set the ball in motion. Now it can’t be stopped till it’s run its course.

I’ve quoted Ayn Rand before; but this, I think, is her best and pithiest epithet: “One does not stop the Juggernaut by throwing oneself in front of it.”

mgeo
mgeo
Jan 18, 2022 7:25 AM
Reply to  rubberheid

Undermining ideas, alternatives and resistance was the purpose of
:- propaganda from childhood, undermined attention span and cancel culture
:- subverted education
:- ratcheting growing poverty
:- destroying communities and the middle class
:- blatant fraud in elections and in prosecution of the oligarchy
:- the latest restrictions on socialising.

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 17, 2022 9:28 AM
Reply to  rubberheid

I used to walk around at night, give hobos food, smoke joints with them, etc.

Sometimes they’d shoot up heroin with cops like, right across the street. That’s also how I discovered heroin is healthier than vaccines.

Soon after that, there were curfews, idiots wearing masks, etc.

I’m pretty sure I shouldn’t bother being decent.

rubberheid
rubberheid
Jan 17, 2022 6:55 PM
Reply to  Alcheminister

it was just a drunken rant, but still, where is societys backbone?

decent? decent? FKN DECENT? decent people aren’t selfish and take the jab.. decent people do what they are told, decent people are all essential workers hahaha

decent ffs : )

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 17, 2022 9:22 PM
Reply to  rubberheid

I don’t accept veiled bullshit.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kYSQz82q8Ng

Or the Lamb of God version.

rubberheid
rubberheid
Jan 17, 2022 6:37 PM
Reply to  rubberheid

when i read it through a day later, instead of skimming, this article was excellent, a beauty perhaps.

good words Ed.

so i will choke on my drunken jibber once again.

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 17, 2022 8:34 PM
Reply to  rubberheid

Not so long ago, my ex-boxer brother told me “Ek gaan jou seer maak”. So he threw like 4 punches at my face, none of those punches landed. He cried soon after that.

And yes, I drink.

I don’t just drink. I’m actually tired of existence.

When a broken heart breaks hearts, knowm sayn?

rubberheid
rubberheid
Jan 17, 2022 9:05 PM
Reply to  Alcheminister

well madman, maybe it regenerates? I boxed too, but left when all the “tough” guys joined, being an athlete pugilist meant nothing when it all becomes milling.

i concur, and wardropper honestly speaks of his deep weariness of life too. I am fukn sick of this life, all it’s utter fk-upness. I never really joined in, the majority of people are indeed a problem, too fkn stoopit to even think the pertinent thochts.

what can we do? i have children, am a grandparent recently, i cannot just retire hermit-style. but i hate this world and wish I was by with it. My dochter is sound and grown up, my son is bigger than me now but still a teen daftie. I will protect and help them til I die. that is my main purpose (and to keep planting).

but I am sick of THIS life, and I ain’t talking about the past 2 years alone!

no, i love this world actually, but i am sick of this “human” element. utterly fuckerly rotten in 90%+
just leave me alone to grow shit for the bugs birds and to feed masel.

drink? am fkn Scots, and in this 1000 years war, 400 years clearance/genocide and cultural erasion, drink eases the pain for sure. that’s just stupid wee “ethnic” pride talking, but drink…? i wish the fucker would give me peace ; ) but i wish the “world” woiuld give us all peace.

cheer up dude, we may inherit the earth? meekness is like the opposite of hubris, not some failing. But you’ll hate that comparison.

: )

rubberheid
rubberheid
Jan 17, 2022 9:06 PM
Reply to  Alcheminister

am gonna smack you a sair yin? is that the translation ek gaan..?

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 17, 2022 9:16 PM
Reply to  rubberheid

That’s what she said.

And no, I don’t love this world.

Also, I’m a MacGregor or whatever.

rubberheid
rubberheid
Jan 17, 2022 9:40 PM
Reply to  Alcheminister

macgregors are a popular mob, outlaws, maybe a convenient scapegoat/noble savage for the victoriana, even tho’ it was before all that.

nobody seems to remember the grahams, border reivers, west march toerags. Their name was outlowed too and many of them “removed” to Ulster and Connacht, well before any Rob Roy tales and “Highland” propaganda… ironically borderers were regarded highlanders too before the scots crown reclassified them all.

utterly absent from the wider context.

narratives, eh?

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 17, 2022 9:44 PM
Reply to  rubberheid

I’ll stop posting coz I’m not influential enough.

wardropper
wardropper
Jan 16, 2022 10:11 PM

“The man of truth does not age. A little more effort and he will not die.”

Now we’re talking…
That’s a lovely quote.

Just one quibble: “Beauty never enslaved anyone” –

Grace Kelly enslaved me way back when I was a kid…

Clutching at straws
Clutching at straws
Jan 16, 2022 8:21 PM

Djokovic is either an idiot or on the payroll.

I can’t decide.

He could have used the Jesse Owens precedent and said that the fascists won’t let him defend his title earning him and the cause enormous kudos.

He could have tried to be honest on his application and said that he is not taking the poison because it is poison.

Instead, he tried to play an unwinnable game.

Top sportsmen don’t do that.

Confused.

Ernest Judd
Ernest Judd
Jan 16, 2022 8:46 PM

It’s really NOT that important.
Just another celebrity, though highly skilled who gets paid for his perfection in his chosen trivial pursuit.
Don’t expect Gautama Buddha.

Clutching at straws
Clutching at straws
Jan 16, 2022 10:57 PM
Reply to  Ernest Judd

It really is THAT important.

Djokavic could have held a torch under the noses of TPTB and highlighted the medical apartheid.

Refusing to play their game could have been a significant step forward.

Instead, he lied and tried to fit into the system.

It stinks.

wardropper
wardropper
Jan 17, 2022 11:48 PM

A celebrity’s opinion on matters outside his field of expertise is as insignificant as anybody else’s.

It’s certainly good to know that not everybody is afraid to say what they think, but let’s just look at what we actually have here:

Djokovic plays tennis like an angel – an undisputed fact.
Djokovic ‘admits’ to being unjabbed – an unverified fact which is none of our business anyway.

Let celebrities do their thing, then leave them alone.
If he says, “F. U. Australia, I’m never coming back here as long as I live”, I’ll enjoy that immensely, but I’m not holding my breath.

wardropper
wardropper
Jan 17, 2022 11:39 PM
Reply to  Ernest Judd

⬆︎
Well said.

antitermite
antitermite
Jan 16, 2022 8:56 PM

He probably got “played”.

I don’t follow tennis but suspect that the AO people led him along, knowing that without him this year would be a dud.

And then there is “no such thing as bad publicity”.

Edith
Edith
Jan 16, 2022 9:58 PM
Reply to  antitermite

Somehow I figured it was all a game not worth getting emotionally involved in from day one….I would say just more distraction from the real issues that the aust economy is being tanked.

New Name
New Name
Jan 17, 2022 2:22 AM
Reply to  Edith

Sport is a clever control mechanism. Imagine the passion fired up over things of absolutely no consequence. The controlling cartels can distract the sheeple and make them forget their own real problems. They can use the passion to lead them down any path, in this case to their own extinction. And there is a lot of money to be made.

mgeo
mgeo
Jan 17, 2022 7:44 AM
Reply to  New Name

While the productive economy was crumbling and people starving or falling ill from withheld treatment, some of the sports industry and related propaganda went on. Some of the overlords even took the time to make their appearances at sports events.

May Hem
May Hem
Jan 17, 2022 4:08 AM
Reply to  Edith

I came to the same conclusion Edith.

wardropper
wardropper
Jan 16, 2022 10:16 PM

He doesn’t need the money, and perhaps he doesn’t need the hassle either.

I’d be inclined to say, “F.U. Australia, I’m never coming back here”.
After all, he has more than proven himself a master in his field.

Let Australia live with the disgrace of fubaring practically everything its so-called government touches these days.
Keep the country at a distance of a million barge-poles, and then some…

Then we can think about applying the same attitude to the rest of our crap-struck world.

rubberheid
rubberheid
Jan 16, 2022 10:23 PM
Reply to  wardropper

really ward we should be destroying that dystopia, not ignoring or sagely “moving on”. fuk all this shit
FIGHT

Clutching at straws
Clutching at straws
Jan 16, 2022 11:04 PM
Reply to  rubberheid

As a good friend said to me recently, “Just wait until a top sportsman or TV celebrity drops dead live on TV”

After a very short illness.

I would add to that that it won’t be the first one that will cause the awakening but the third, fourth, fifth or even the sixth until the fucking idiots wake up to what they have done to themselves

New Name
New Name
Jan 17, 2022 2:27 AM

At least 350 sportsmen and women have collapsed in the field in recent months as a result of the clot shot. More than half of them have subsequently died. Also TV presenters. The well known comedian Bob Saget (?) was recently killed by the lethal injection. An NY Slimes editor not long before that.

mgeo
mgeo
Jan 17, 2022 8:18 AM

Staff and guests in TV studios have already been collapsing in 2021. As for sports people in training or on the field, collapses and deaths over 2021 rose from 6 and 3 in Jan. to 74 and 51 in Dec., according to this link someone posted here yesterday:
comment image

rubberheid
rubberheid
Jan 17, 2022 7:25 PM

aye, maybe never as heart attacks are common in people who exercise a lot!! especially kids

; )

siamdave
siamdave
Jan 17, 2022 3:19 AM
Reply to  rubberheid

fight yea, but how about fight smart and not stupid

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 17, 2022 9:37 AM
Reply to  siamdave

Ruse de guerre.

Strategy and tactics are more important than simply involving yourself with bullshit as a “soldier”.

rubberheid
rubberheid
Jan 17, 2022 7:32 PM
Reply to  siamdave

are you calling me stupid?ffs there’s numpties at large (on “our” side) who want us all to go out and fight the coppers because they are coppers ffs! what do you take me for??

fear of violence does expose the general coward in my experience…. maybe that falls along desmet or panic response figures too??

please understand i am not advocating flailing, random thuggery. But i do believe the cunts in charge only understand that, and death.

The King and I will discuss your fate later dave ; )

wardropper
wardropper
Jan 17, 2022 11:55 PM
Reply to  rubberheid

I’m with you on that, rubber.
It’s just that I think Australians need to do their own domestic fighting in this case.
I’ll do my fighting here in Iceland, which of course couldn’t be farther away from Australia…
I’m not “moving on” in the least. Not One Inch.

Clutching at straws
Clutching at straws
Jan 16, 2022 10:52 PM
Reply to  wardropper

Think about my argument.

If he had said he won’t play because the rules are fascist it would have advanced the cause tremendously.

At least, it would have sparked a question or two and, let’s be honest, there aren’t many questions being asked about the narrative at that level.

les online
les online
Jan 17, 2022 12:48 AM

You are confused. Djokovik is not the issue. The politician in charge based his decision on not allowing any person who espoused ‘anti-vaxxer’ sentiments to enter Australia. The politician in charge believes such persons, especially if popular, are a threat to social peace, as allowing them entry might excite local ‘anti-vaxxers’ to action… Australians must be protected from ‘anti-vaxxer’s’ claims. …

mgeo
mgeo
Jan 17, 2022 8:26 AM
Reply to  les online

It would be heresy or a religious scism.

Croach
Croach
Jan 17, 2022 1:02 AM

The Djokovic Foundation is a WEF partner.

El Zafio
El Zafio
Jan 17, 2022 5:58 PM
Reply to  Croach

This is claimed to be Djokovic holding some sort of freemasonry diploma.
https://www.minds.com/newsfeed/1329855721470169098

Hemlockfen
Hemlockfen
Jan 16, 2022 8:07 PM

Must be Kindred Spirits in the closet that are being conjured up. The same thing keeps going through my mind when I hear the same noises. It’s all lies. Except I have not written anything in notebooks. My thoughts, however, are always followed up with this: Arrest them, try them, sentence them to death, execute them. Maybe it’s just me, but I think it’s Kindred Spirits. We are dealing with stubborn mules…….

Paul Vonharnish
Paul Vonharnish
Jan 16, 2022 6:29 PM

“Power is controlling what happens; absolute power is controlling what people think about what happens.” 

– Caitlin Johnstone – (October 20, 2021)

Sophie - Admin1
Admin
Sophie - Admin1
Jan 16, 2022 6:58 PM

She’s wrong – power is controlling what people THINK happened.

Edith
Edith
Jan 16, 2022 9:59 PM

Indeed and determining what they get to think about in the first place.

rubberheid
rubberheid
Jan 17, 2022 7:34 PM
Reply to  Edith

aye

siamdave
siamdave
Jan 17, 2022 6:22 AM

– maybe both …

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 17, 2022 9:39 AM

From what I’ve seen, Caitline Johnstone is a collectivist idiot peddling shallow industrialism. She even allows for the idea of mandatory vaccination “for the greater good”…though without ever trying to address the fraud of covid, vaccines, pasteur methodology, etc.

The hypocrisy and contradictions she often exhibits, some kind of statist idealist, really discourages me from even considering her.

Well, all I can say is I’m not joining that sort of collective.

S Cooper
S Cooper
Jan 16, 2022 6:19 PM

comment image
comment image

“The war racketeer corporate fascist eugenicist oligarch mobster psychopath Nazis believe there are too many of us untermenschen useless eater plague rats. They want to cull as many of us as possible. But to in order to accomplish that the psychos need to experiment on us first.”

S Cooper
S Cooper
Jan 16, 2022 6:25 PM
Reply to  S Cooper

“Jim Jones was a rank amateur compared to those psychotic freaks.”
comment image
comment image

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 17, 2022 9:45 AM
Reply to  S Cooper

“Gain of function” means coopting your body. Very few people seem to notice it’s more about sort of, control, slavery and using their bodies as research labs, drug production, etc (various vaccine concoctions, EM).

Say, with beliefs in their bullshit, buying and accepting vaccines, pharma shit based on that, and generally being controlled, that’s the sort of function they gain from you.

I’d *almost* wager it ties into the likes of insecure pieces of shit like Langer, Lieber, Gates etc trying to use your bodies to find “cures” for their impending doom (from say, cancers).

Covid (being a non-thing) is merely the suggestive setup for reductionist, religious belief and subsequent capitulation to those who claim to be authoritative and, practically, enlist you as fodder in one of the numerous “war ons” (against morons, and you being the targeted moron, assuming you support and enlist in those wars).

So imagine those vaccines as (bio)mechanical engineering payloads, used for instance to hijack iron oxide from your red blood cells (associated clotting, oxygenation, magnetism issues, etc), to aggregate larger magnetite sort of structures, as an example. But of course, it would only have so much efficacy, thus to continue the cooption/engineering of their bodies…boosters!

Also, with that magnetite being quite the EM absorber. Also, magnetic iron oxide data storage is a thing.

vgin taos
vgin taos
Jan 16, 2022 4:57 PM

This is a beautiful article brother Curtin. But let us not forget, that France was occupying Algeria — we should include what Algerian writers and thinkers think about Camus. It doesn’t take away it only adds.

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 17, 2022 10:24 AM
Reply to  vgin taos

Right?

Algeria was supposedly nuked by France, iirc. Did Camus know, mention that?

I honestly don’t read books and such (particularly supposed history, scripture, etc), I tend to the central, temporal, pineal.

Victor G.
Victor G.
Jan 17, 2022 9:14 PM
Reply to  Alcheminister

Try reading a book. Honestly!

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 18, 2022 11:06 AM
Reply to  Victor G.

No.

yossam
yossam
Jan 16, 2022 4:27 PM

Cheers Edward.

rob2
rob2
Jan 16, 2022 4:26 PM

One side fears… the other side is flabbergasted.

My husband is on the fearful side. Even now. Living with his fears is suffocating and most infuriating. But there is a third side which I’d go so far to say is worse than the former: the people-pleasing person who knows it’s all bullshit but goes along because she wants what she wants when she wants it, and who despised and mocked me because I wouldn’t also go along.

Ernest Judd
Ernest Judd
Jan 16, 2022 8:50 PM
Reply to  rob2

Good on you. Do not prostitute yourself!
I have said numerous times to Branch Covidians that I will NOT prostitute my health sovereignty for the mere promise of a “normal” life.

rob2
rob2
Jan 17, 2022 1:07 AM
Reply to  Ernest Judd

Thanks Judd. Right back at ya!

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 17, 2022 10:25 AM
Reply to  rob2

And I’m just wondering…your husband?

Rob is a peculiar name for a wife.

rob2
rob2
Jan 17, 2022 2:57 PM
Reply to  Alcheminister

You seem reasonably intelligent – rack your brain for a unisex name.

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 17, 2022 5:51 PM
Reply to  rob2

Nah.

I’m 50% of something.

I appreciate you say that I seem “reasonably intelligent”. That makes me feel better about myself and slightly more suicidal.

If you encourage me a bit more, I might even go kill myself with vaccines.

IJScambling
IJScambling
Jan 16, 2022 4:06 PM

The paradox lies in the yearning for the cosmos as a moral order versus the “absurd” in terms of its incomprehensibility, plus humanity’s foraging into bestial moments such as Nazism and the current pillaging over inflated diseases. Camus opted to resist and was/is deeply inspiring. The question remains whether humanity might evolve to a brain level worthy of this struggle versus sheep-like obedience and self-indulgence. “God” needs defining.

Howard
Howard
Jan 16, 2022 3:54 PM

Anytime Edward Curtin takes a journey with Albert Camus, I will be along for the ride. But, owing to youthful posturing, only as a passenger, never behind the wheel.

In college (junior college, where the poor or the lower IQ’d go) in the middle 60s, Existentialism and Albert Camus were all the rage. Everyone was into Camus and Sartre. Not wanting to run with the crowd, I avoided Camus like the “Plague.” I attempted to read some Sartre (his thesis on Jean Genet: “Saint Genet”); but I wouldn’t touch Camus.

I bought a Camus novel – “The Rebel”; but never read it. Then, along with a few other books (paperbacks) in my library, a mouse somehow peed on it. Perhaps that mouse understood better than I did that, having refused to read Camus when I could have, I had forfeited the right to ever read him.

Such is life.

dom irritant
dom irritant
Jan 17, 2022 7:01 AM
Reply to  Howard

Your loss.

Will
Will
Jan 16, 2022 2:54 PM

Another brilliant piece, by this prolific artist.

Vagabard
Vagabard
Jan 16, 2022 2:49 PM

Novel. Don’t put the “plague” in the title. Put something like “The Prisoners.”

The Prisoners‘ would have fitted the storyline of Camus’ ‘The Plague‘ just as well. It’s certainly worth a read. People trapped in a plague-ridden town. Much like ‘lockdown’. Full of a variety of different characters coping with the situation. Some scrupulous. Others less so. Much like our times.

I believe Camus was also part of the French Resistance

Thankful reader
Thankful reader
Jan 16, 2022 1:34 PM

Read Rene Guenon instead of Camus.

Will
Will
Jan 16, 2022 3:02 PM

And according to Mr Guenon, the Kaliyuga finishes in 2030/31. I know, another man’s calculations, based on certain assumptions, and all that – and what is this story about a ‘Kaliyuga’, anyway?

Nevertheless, Rene was a bright boy. I find it kind of fascinating . . .

wardropper
wardropper
Jan 16, 2022 10:25 PM
Reply to  Will

It’s not all good news…
The Age of Kali Yuga is so long that it won’t just end overnight.
These things take hundreds of years to peak, or dip.
Cosmic rhythms are very big, which is why we don’t notice them.

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 17, 2022 10:27 AM
Reply to  Will

Kama Kama (that’s like dual-scythes, but a bit more portable) chameleon. I come, you go. It’s one of Kali’s Sutras, right? Yuga dat rite.

jimbojames
jimbojames
Jan 16, 2022 12:32 PM

Uh, sorry, Beauty enslaves Man all the time, every time. In fact, I have an hypothesis that, by and large, Man can’t say No to Beauty and ’tis the true source of Man’s downfall.

Howard
Howard
Jan 16, 2022 3:43 PM
Reply to  jimbojames

I almost jumped on that bandwagon with you. Thinking of all the fine buildings with all the fine furnishings built for the rulers through the ages, for a moment I questioned Camus’ wisdom.

Then it struck me: that artificial beauty was not what Camus was talking about. Beauty is internal, not external. A thing has beauty not because it’s pleasant to look at or to listen to or to ruminate over; but because it expresses, be it in form or function or whatever, a truth.

Beauty is truth; and truth cannot enslave.

Dr Justin
Dr Justin
Jan 16, 2022 8:45 PM
Reply to  Howard

“Beauty is truth, truth beauty,—that is all
               Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.”

John Keats

Ernest Judd
Ernest Judd
Jan 16, 2022 8:53 PM
Reply to  Howard

Excellent answer, Sir!

jimbojames
jimbojames
Jan 16, 2022 11:24 PM
Reply to  Howard

Regardless of ‘inner’ beauty–I’m not even sure there’s such a thing–I was referring to actual (physical) beauty.

It’s funny that you mention ‘truth and beauty’ because I refer you to terror and beauty, like as in Rilke’s wonderful thoughts to experience both, and close with my own gloss: To know Truth is both Terrifying and Beautiful (not the inner kind but the actual kind).

Howard
Howard
Jan 17, 2022 3:47 AM
Reply to  jimbojames

Truth need not be pretty to be beautiful. Truth can be ugly – as in the truth that certain powerful individuals imagine they have a right to rule over others. Beauty lies in the realization that this is true, not in the frame holding the truth.

Waldorf
Waldorf
Jan 16, 2022 6:19 PM
Reply to  Duckman

Parts tend to be quoted by historians. Its existence is not suppressed – presumably they just see no reason to quote in full Hitler’s last note just before he stepped off. Obviously he didn’t like ___. The Kaiser said he didn’t want WW1 either.

Duckman
Duckman
Jan 16, 2022 6:34 PM
Reply to  Waldorf

I made no claims, just found it interesting, 2 yrs in to the intensified “nothing is quite as it seems” program it sits there like the 3 million starved in India by churchill and the fact that so many of the worlds worst sheisters have and do hide behind the banner “jew”, being neither israelites or hebrew.
Will this shitfest ever end? I guess the answer is no, but such is the way when you remove the lid from a tin of worms and find it full of jelly beans, then find they are the harry potter variety.
Little if anything is “sacred” anymore, truth is merely based upon the magnitude or otherwise of the rose tint of the pair you wear today and the pair you wear tomorrow.
As mused with a freind this afternoon, who are we to reject out of hand the intended genetic “upgrade” of humanity when so much shyte lies behind us?
The only answer to that is the same fuckers who engineer the shyte are behind the “upgrade”. so fuck em eh?
I like my imperfections they gve me something to work with and something to work on
Still, what with w.e.f gathering tomorrow, full moon and the imminent arrival of asteroid what ever its name is to a mere 1.3 million miles away, “things are sure to get interesting”.
Be well :0)

rubberheid
rubberheid
Jan 17, 2022 7:41 PM
Reply to  Duckman

+1

sean ryan
sean ryan
Jan 16, 2022 11:47 AM

Thank god we have people looking to protect our health.

As per the CDC on of the biggest ongoing threats to human health remains smoking.

Smoking leads to disease and disability and harms nearly every organ of the body.
Cigarette smoking remains the leading cause of preventable disease, disability, and death in the United States.
The tobacco industry spends billions of dollars each year on marketing cigarettes.
Smoking costs the United States hundreds of billions of dollars each year.
States do not spend much of the money they get from tobacco taxes and lawsuits to prevent smoking and help smokers quit. CDC recommends that states spend 12% of those funds on tobacco control.
In 2019, 14.0% of all adults (34.1 million people) currently smoked cigarettes: 15.3% of men, 12.7% of women.
Each day, about 1,600 youth try their first cigarette.

Whom are the largest shareholders of the largest Big Tobacco companies, like Altria, Philip Morris, British American Tobacco, Imperial brands, etc.?
The largest Big Asset Management firms & Big Banks, like Vanguard, BlackRock, State Street, Fidelity, Invesco, JP Morgan, the Capital Group and others, whom exist as a true CARTEL, similarly existing largely as the largest shareholders/investors of each other.

(side note: of all the studies linking tobacco use to cancer, heart disease & such, none focus exclusively on pure tobacco itself, but include the over 599 approved additives used by Big Tobacco to make their highly-processed products more addictive, more potent, more flavorful, etc. In fact, numerous Universities and Researchers are discovering that pure tobacco itself has anti-cancer and medicinal properties, via the phytochemicals it contains).

Protecting public health?

Also as per the CDC Obesity was also one of the main causes of premature deaths & chronic illness.

   The US obesity prevalence was 42.4% in 2017 – 2018.
   From 1999 –2000 through 2017 –2018, US obesity prevalence increased from 30.5% to 42.4%. During the same time, the prevalence of severe obesity increased from 4.7% to 9.2%.
   Obesity-related conditions include heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer. These are among the leading causes of preventable, premature death.
   The estimated annual medical cost of obesity in the United States was $147 billion in 2008. Medical costs for people who had obesity was $1,429 higher than medical costs for people with healthy weight.

Whom are the largest shareholders of the largest Big Softdrink companies, like CocaCola, PepsiCo, Keurig Dr Pepper, etc.?
And the largest Big Junkfood companies, like Kraft Heinz, Mondelez, Frito Lay, etc.?
Again, the largest Big Asset Management firms & Big Banks, like Vanguard, BlackRock, State Street, Fidelity, Invesco, JP Morgan, the Capital Group and others, whom exist as a true CARTEL, similarly existing largely as the largest shareholders/investors of each other.

Protecting public health?

Of course this CARTEL of Big Asset Management firms & Big Banks similarly exist as the largest shareholders of Big Pharma “vaccine” makers, like Pfizer, Moderna, Johnson & Johnson.

Thank god we have people looking to protect our health.

The exact same CARTEL of Big Asset Management firms & Big Banks that are profiteering by “protecting public health” are similarly the same profiteers whom are actively destroying our health in the first place.

New Name
New Name
Jan 16, 2022 9:59 PM
Reply to  sean ryan

Plus 10.
Blackrock and the rest also finance merchants of death like Lockheed. Good for the health of those bombed and napalm and agent orange sprayed by Western “defence” forces.

sean ryan
sean ryan
Jan 17, 2022 4:40 PM
Reply to  New Name

Lockheed, and Boeing, and Raytheon, and General Dynamics, and Northrop, and Huntington Ingalls, and BAE, and L3Harris Tech, and so on….

The same friggin’ CARTEL largely own, and control most everything now.

These are the firms of the neo-feudal Lords that we’re being told to place our health, faith & trust in.

les online
les online
Jan 16, 2022 10:22 PM
Reply to  sean ryan

Percy Weston wrote a book, ‘Cancer. Cause & Cure.’ Percy had a mixed farming property in Victoria Australia. He grew ‘deep, rich, chocolaty colour.’ tobacco. He was contracted by a tobacco company. They required that he supply them with the light, golden leaf that was the result of the plants being fed tons of superphosphates.
Percy claims lung cancers were rare when people smoked the thick chocolaty leaf. To read “numerous researchers…are discovering that pure tobacco has anti-cancer and medicinal properties.”.. confirms Percy’s layman’s observations…
..

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 17, 2022 9:54 AM
Reply to  les online

That’s probably why tobacco is coopted, toxified, etc. *OTHER* than its association with slavery.

Which also relates to viruses, btw, with TMV (a result of soil deficiencies, homogenization, and toxification).

sean ryan
sean ryan
Jan 17, 2022 5:00 PM
Reply to  les online

Appreciate the contribution.

I grow tons of tobacco, I love the flowers and the delightful scent they give, as do the pollinators.
My tobacco plants are always a favorite of bees & butterflies.

I find it interesting that synthetic neonicotinoids are amongst the most deadly pesticides, and have been implicated as a possible cause of bee population loss, yet pollinators love the natural nicotine in my organic tobacco plants.
Numerous studies have shown numerous benefits of the pollen of natural tobacco flowers, including warding off parasites from pollinators.

I grow everything in my own vermicast, aka worm manure.
Most every natural antibiotic, natural antiviral, natural vitamins, natural polyphenols (aka phytochemicals, like flavonoids, tannins, lignans, terpenoids, etc.) & other beneficial compounds come from interactions of microorganisms as they work with enzymes, secondary metabolites, and other compounds.

The history of the study of the virus began with the identification & study of the Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV).
I have conducted my own numerous experiments and have noted, consistently, that tobacco plants grown in vermicast do not succumb to TMV, as often do plants grown in synthetic fertilizers and/or other less sustainable practices.

The rapid growth of the tobacco industry meant the use of less sustainable growing methods.
Which led to highly-deficient soils, and less healthy plants.

We are often “advancing” so much that we are becoming ignorant of natural processes.
And creating our own problems in the process.

Pure natural tobacco was used as an herbal medicine for centuries before Big Tobacco came along & destroyed it’s beneficial qualities.

Biocatalytic and semisynthetic studies of the anticancer tobacco cembranoids
The tobacco can kill the cancer–by a molecule called “NAD1” which is obtained from flowers of Nicotiana alata

les online
les online
Jan 17, 2022 11:01 PM
Reply to  sean ryan

+ 100

steadydirt
steadydirt
Jan 19, 2022 2:53 AM
Reply to  les online

original people called it medicine

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 16, 2022 11:20 AM

I had something really important to say. I’ll try to remember what that was.

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 16, 2022 11:23 AM
Reply to  Alcheminister

Oh right. History.

Fuckoff.

Learn from the present, how’s about that? In the present, there are many curses (like fuck you). Now, what causes those curses? Witches? Like, I mean, Queen Jimmy (for PC reasons) burned various witches who did not appeal to his faggotry. That was an amazing idea, because. If you look at history, that’s also associated with corporate slavery.

And, so. I don’t care. Coz idiots are trying to stab children with toxins and they need to be “differently abled”, according to my perspective.

jimbojames
jimbojames
Jan 16, 2022 12:26 PM
Reply to  Alcheminister

maybe if you studied/learned history you’d know how ancient or old the curse word motherfucker is? Here’s a hint: it’s the oldest (motherfucker) ‘curse’ word in the world, followed up, I’d gather, by Fuck Yu or go fuck yourself. I should’ve said its origins, i.e. if you studied history you’d know where it comes from, and why, though by now I suspect you could guess.

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 16, 2022 1:44 PM
Reply to  jimbojames

Are you suggesting anti-life “worldly” morons try to abuse the Earth? Well, luckily, I’m not of this world!

I took a look at supposed history and it was like “Nah”.

For instance, the rather mentally retarded, they’re like “Covid vaccines are bad, but I’m not an anti-vaxxer, other toxic vaccines also based on fraud to degenerate that cannot be beneficial in any way whatsoever, they’re different…those are GOOD vaccines”.

rubberheid
rubberheid
Jan 17, 2022 7:45 PM
Reply to  jimbojames

well tell us motherfucker! i understand “fuck” comes from the germanic tongues, so how ancient is that outside central and northern europe? do explain.

je cursez vous! (attrib. Magua)

Johnny
Johnny
Jan 16, 2022 11:03 AM

Could it be Edward, that the ‘virus’ is now the ‘rock’ and we are condemned to pushing it back up their mountain of lies until we perish?

0use4msm
0use4msm
Jan 16, 2022 11:01 AM

The take away from Camus’s The Plague is that one must persist in fighting catastrophe with the full consciousness that doing so is an absurd endeavour. Only the recognition that the absurd faces all of us, collectively, is what can provide it with any meaning. In his 1951 book The Rebel, Camus writes: “I rebel, therefore we exist.”

New Nane
New Nane
Jan 16, 2022 10:53 AM

Disgraceful double standards. French resistance to the German occupation was noble but Algerian resistance to French occupation was terrorism. Why is this bugger a hero ?

sam quentin
sam quentin
Jan 16, 2022 12:07 PM
Reply to  New Nane

When the Algerian War of Independence began in 1954 it presented a moral dilemma for Camus. He identified with pied-noirs, and defended the French government on the grounds that revolt of its North African colony was really an integral part of the ‘new Arab imperialism’ led by Egypt.

“As far as Algeria is concerned, national independence is a formula driven by nothing other than passion. There has never yet been an Algerian nation. The Jews, Turks, Greeks, Italians, or Berbers would be as entitled to claim the leadership of this potential nation. As things stand, the Arabs alone do not comprise the whole of Algeria. The size and duration of the French settlement, in particular, are enough to create a problem that cannot be compared to anything else in history. The French of Algeria are also natives, in the strong sense of the word. Moreover, a purely Arab Algeria could not achieve that economic independence without which political independence is nothing but an illusion. However inadequate the French effort has been, it is of such proportions that no other country would today agree to take over the responsibility.”
(Quoted in Said, Edward. Culture and Imperialism, Vintage Books, New York, 1993. pp. 179)

People need to be careful about mere “either/or” dichotomous thinking.
Often, situations are far more complex that merely this or that polarization.

I’m certainly not qualified to speak for Camus, but it seems that rather than a mere “either for the french or for the Algerians”, it was much more complicated.

It is easy to criticize.
It if often far tougher to consider other views.
Perhaps you should read more about this topic.

And keep in mind, we’re all human…
And we’re all fallible.

Will
Will
Jan 16, 2022 2:54 PM
Reply to  sam quentin

Well said. And very interesting.

New Name
New Name
Jan 16, 2022 10:09 PM
Reply to  sam quentin

If that was what Said said (no pun intended) I am disappointed. During Camus’ lifetime, in 1957, JFK made his first senate foreign policy speech in which he supported Algerian independence. De Gaulle gave Algeria independence and was lucky to survive an OAS assassination attempt. The OAS was solidly pro Israel and has been implicated in the JFK assassination.

The Coming Revolution
The Coming Revolution
Jan 17, 2022 12:25 AM
Reply to  New Name

You shouldn’t be disappointed. As sam quentin said, the history of French presence in what was to be called Algeria is not that simple, and is just an example of the complex situations Capital can bring about. Camus was not for French presence in Algeria and against the indigenous, non-European population, and I agree with Edward Said that French effort in Algeria was very inadequate.

The context – France had already concessions (fishing) in North Africa which was a regency under the Ottoman empire, but had plans very early to colonize the whole coast for, what else, economic reasons: saturations of European markets (she lost the American market of cotton), need for more land for agriculture and so on.

Long story short, by the time of Camus, the population of Algeria was made up of a great majority of the indigenous population, and a minority of Europeans. Most of the European population lived in the cities and were working class living peacefully and were empathetic to their indigenous comrades who lived in slightly lower conditions but still bearable; the difference had to do with difference in professional aptitude rather than to anything else; you had also the indigenous of the outskirts of the cities and the peasantry who lived in miserable conditions. Then you had the big European settlers who had large lands and other big investments like fishing, agriculture, and so on. These are few people who were very influential (it is precisely for them or rather for their ancestors that the colonisation was made in the first place) in the Algerian parliament and in Paris and could overthrow any government formed in Paris they didn’t like. Any government,that is, that pretended to have a progressive policy towards the autochthonous population. The point is, even though, as it may be expected, French Capital did wonders in North Africa for more than a century, which benefitted all who lived there, the indigenous populations still were not on same level regarding political rights as the Europeans. They had same obligations but no same rights; they had access to education, health, could acquire land, paid taxes, etc, but their vote and the vote of their Algerian representatives, when they had any, didn’t count much and therefore they had pretty much no say in the political or economical decisions in the country they lived in long before the Europeans.

The reason the economic Lobby in Algeria wanted to keep the indigenous population as second class citizens, was that it were a majority, and if given political power would threaten all that the lobby had achieved and the privileges and influence they had acquired.

After WWII, as in other places, a movement for national liberation revived in Algeria, encouraged by the USA and England. After some years the attitude of Paris towards Algeria became more progressive encouraging policies of integration (no second class citizens) but still the economic power in Algiers was too strong. Besides, middle and upper class Europeans joined ranks with that Lobby out of feat of loseing their, well, country. The indigenous population who for so many years demanded equal political rights as the Europeans lost hope and started asking for independence. At first it was the works of Algerian intellectuals chiefly, but slowly the movement became widespread.

Albert Camus wanted the Algerians and Europeans to live together peacefully and in friendship as they were indeed living. Camus was speaking from the standpoint of the working class, and against the economic Mafia that sabogated every attempt to made that peacefull coexistence official and effective.

The Coming Revolution
The Coming Revolution
Jan 17, 2022 1:00 AM

Most of the information above is from the book Naissance, Vie et Mort de l’Algérie Française by Michel Honorin, Claude Guillaumin, and Guy Claisse (1989)

sam quentin
sam quentin
Jan 17, 2022 5:08 PM

Nice contribution.
Very informative.

People need to be ware of highly-narrative history (and/or any highly-narrative info).

Everyone should always aspire to seek out more complex & comprehensive data & info.

“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge”.
-Charles Darwin-

The Dunning Kruger effect is generally formed on this basis, the ignorant are to ignorant to realize their own ignorance, thus are more confident in what they think they know.

jubal hershaw
jubal hershaw
Jan 16, 2022 10:31 PM
Reply to  sam quentin

I’ll have you know The Catholic Pope is infallible.

rubberheid
rubberheid
Jan 17, 2022 7:48 PM
Reply to  sam quentin

interesting : )

Waldorf
Waldorf
Jan 16, 2022 6:22 PM
Reply to  New Nane

Camus was pretty mainstream in French terms and perhaps because he himself was a pied noir he was not sympathetic to Algerian aspirations. Like George Orwell he did not entirely overcome his origins.

wardropper
wardropper
Jan 16, 2022 10:30 PM
Reply to  Waldorf

The number of people who can entirely overcome their origins is so small that what we can learn from them could be argued to represent the very purpose of life – the actual reason we’re here:

To work, and to learn.

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 17, 2022 9:55 AM
Reply to  wardropper

Apparently I have a different purpose in life.

wardropper
wardropper
Jan 18, 2022 12:11 AM
Reply to  Alcheminister

Nobody said we’re all the same, and purposes in life can be very flexible.

When I say, “to work and learn”, for example, we can sometimes change our minds about what constitutes ‘work’, and switch to something else which we find more fulfilling than what is currently providing (or not providing) for our needs.
Of course I don’t include working for a boss as ‘work’…
By work, I mean energetically doing what you do best – simply because you enjoy it, but you need good luck to get to be in that position.

There are also countless ways to learn – about ourselves, about art, about science, about how to distinguish between fake and real, and so on…

Whatever your purpose, Alch, it isn’t set in stone, and it doesn’t have to be the same as anybody else’s.
However, I have a hunch that sooner or later, we all find the significant intrinsic value of working and learning. After all, the age of 96 does tend to put some serious hurdles in the way of other things…

Alcheminister
Alcheminister
Jan 18, 2022 11:09 AM
Reply to  wardropper

There is no fucking way I’m reaching 96. I’d honestly have suicided by now if I had truly viable options, unlike merely “somewhat efficacious” (in the context) vaccines.