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Nostalgic for the Future

Edward Curtin

Despite its pedigree as a fundamental element in civilization’s greatest stories, nostalgia has come to be associated with treacly sentimentality, defeatism, and spurious spiritual inclinations.

Homer, Vergil, Dante, the Biblical writers, and their ilk would demur, of course, but they have been dead for a few years, so progress’s mantra urges us to get on with it.  This is now.

But now is always, and like its twin – exile – nostalgia is perpetual.

The aching for “home” – from Greek algos, pain + nostos, homecoming – is not simply a desire for the past, whether in reality or imagination, time or place, but a passionate yearning for the best from the past to be brought into the future.

Nostalgia may be more a long ache of old people, but it is also a feeling that follows everyone along life’s way.  Its presence may be shorter in youth, and it may be brief, intermittent, and unrecognized, but it is there. Surely it grows with experience.

As everyone knows, a taste, a smell, a sight, a sound, a song – can conjure up a moment’s happiness, a reverie of possibility.  Paradise regained, but differently.

A yearning recognized, as with seeing for the first time how Van Gogh’s blue paint opens a door to ecstasy or a line of poetry cracks open a space in one’s heart for prospective love.  Hope reborn as an  aperture to the beyond reimagined and made possible.

There is no need to ever leave where we are to find that we are already no longer there, for living is a perpetual leaving-taking, and the ache of loss is its price.

But like all pains, it is one we wish to relieve in the future; and in order to make a future, we must be able to imagine or remember it first.  We are all exiled in our own ways. Home was yesterday, and our lost homes lie in our futures, if we hold to the dream of homecoming, whatever that may mean to each person.  But it also has a universal meaning, since we dwell on this earth together, our one home for our entire human family.

You may think I am engaging in fluff and puff and flimsy imaginings. But no.

All across the world there are hundreds of millions of exiles, forced by wars, power politics, poverty, starvation, destructive capitalism, and modernization’s calamitous consequences to leave their homes and suffer the disorientation of wandering.  Emigration, immigration, salvaging bits of the old in the new strange lands – thus is their plight.  So much lost and small hopes found in nostalgic remembering. Piecing together the fragments.

But in a far less physical sense, the homeless mind is the rule today. There are very few people these days who don’t wish to somehow return to a time when the madness that engulfs us didn’t exist; to escape the whirligig of fragmented consciousness in which the world appears – i.e. is presented by the media – as a pointillistic painting whose dots move so rapidly that a coherent picture is near impossible.

This feeling is widespread.  It is not a question of politics.  It crisscrosses the world following the hyper-real unreality of the technologies that join us in a state of transcendental homelessness and anxiety.  All the propaganda about a “new normal” and a digital disembodied future ring hollow. The Great Reset is the Great Nightmare.  Nothing seems normal anymore and the future seems even less so.

The world has become Weirdsville. This is something that most people – young and old – feel, even if they can’t articulate it.  The feeling that all the news is false and that some massive con game is underway is pandemic.

Here is an insignificant bit of nostalgia.  I mention it because it points beyond itself, then and now.  It has always been nostalgia for the future.  I think it is a commonplace experience.

When I was in high school, there was a tiny cheese shop on Lexington Avenue and 85th St. in New York City near the subway that I took to and home from school. It was the size of a walk-in closet. Thousands of cheeses surrounded you when you entered. The smells were overwhelming. I would often stop in there with empty pockets on my way home from school.

The proprietor, knowing I was in awe of the thousands of cheeses, would often give me little samples with pieces of crusty French bread.  He would regale me with tales of Paris and the histories of the various European cheeses. He would emphasize their livingness, how they breathed.

By the door was a large basket filled with long loaves of fragrant French bread flown in every morning from Paris by Air France. These were the days before every supermarket sold knockoff versions of the genuine thing. Each long loaf was in a colorful French tricolored paper bag.

Those loaves of bread in the French colors always transported me to Paris, a place I had never been, but whose language I was studying.  Then, and for years afterwards, I was nostalgic for a Paris that was not yet part of my physical experience. How could this be? I asked myself.

One day I realized that I was not nostalgic for Paris or the cheese shop, nor for the cheese or the bread, which I had tasted many times, but for the paper bags the bread came in.

Why?

This question perplexed me until I realized my notion of nostalgia was wrong. For those bags had always represented the future for me, the birds of flight a sign of freedom beckoning as my youthful world expanded. My nostalgia for the Air France bags was a way to go back to go forward, not to wallow in sentimentality and the “good old days,” but to read the entrails for their prophetic message: the small-life world is limiting – expand your horizons.

It was not a question of jumping on a plane and going somewhere different, although that in time would also be good.  It was not an invitation to revisit that cheese shop, as if that were possible, for the store was long gone and in any case it would not mean the same thing.  It was not a desire to become a teenager again. You cannot repeat an experience, despite F. Scott Fitzgerald writing:  “You can’t repeat the past?…Why of course you can.”

The past in that sense is quicksand, a death wish.  For many people (and this is the prevalent understanding of nostalgia as an exclusively negative way of thinking), embittered nostalgia is their way of denying the present and the future, often by the fictitious creation of “the good old days” when everything was supposedly so much better.

But nostalgia can also be an impetus to create a better future, a reminder that good aspects of what has been lost need to be regained to change the course of the present’s future trajectory.

Today most people are bamboozled by world events, as an idiot wind blows through the putrescent words of the media sycophants who churn out their endlessly deceptive and confusing propaganda on behalf of their elite masters.  Given a few minutes peace of mind to analyze this drivel – a tranquility destroyed by the electronic frenzy – it becomes apparent that their fear, anxiety, and contradictory reports are intentional, part of a strategy to pound down the public into drooling, quaking morons.

But many people in their better moments do recall times when they experienced glimpses of a better life, transitory as those experiences might have been.  Moments when they felt more at home in their skin in a world where they belonged and they could make better sense of the news they received.  Not lost and wandering and constantly fearfully agitated by a future seemingly chaotic, leading to dusty death in a story told by an idiot full of sound and fury signifying nothing.

I suggest that those nostalgic moments revolve around the changing nature of our experience of space and time.

There was a time when time was time and space and speed had some human meaning, for people lived within the limits of the natural world of which they were a part.

As I wrote once before:

In former days you could cross over to other people’s lives and come back with a different perspective, knowing what was obvious was true and that to exist meant to be composed of flesh and blood like all the others in different places and to be bound by the natural cycles of life and death, spring and fall, summer and winter. There were limits then, on the land, water, and even in the sky, where space too had dimensions and the stars and planets weren’t imaginary landing strips for mad scientists and their partners in celluloid fantasies.

In that rapidly disappearing world where people felt situated in space and time, life was not yet a holographic spectacle of repetitive images and words, a pseudo-world of shadowy figures engaging in pseudo-debates on electronic screens with people traveling from one place to another only to find that they never left home. When the mind is homeless and the grey magic of digital propaganda is its element, life becomes a vast circinate wandering to nowhere.

The experience of traveling thousands of miles only to see the same chain of stores lining the same roads in the same towns across a country where the same people live with their same machines and same thoughts in their same lives in their same clothes.

A mass society of mass minds in the hive created by cell phones and measured in nanoseconds where the choices are the freedom to choose what is always the same within a cage of categories meant to render all reality a ‘mediated reality.’

Nostalgia is always about time and space. In that sense, it is equivalent to all human experience that also takes place within these dimensions.  And when technology has radically disrupted our human sense of limits in their regard, it becomes harder and harder to feel at home, to dwell enough to grasp what is happening in the world.

I believe that many people feel nostalgic for slower and more silent days when they could hear themselves think a bit.  When the sense of always being on the go and lacking time predominates as it does today, thinking becomes very difficult.

To think, one must dethrone King Rush and silence Queen Noise, the two conditions that the speed and noise of digital technology render impossible.

Tranquilized by the beeping trivia pouring out of the omnipresent electronic gadgets, the very devices being used by the elites to control the masses, a profound grasp of the source of one’s disquietude is impossible. The world becomes impossible to read. The sense of always being away, ungrounded, and mentally homeless in a cacophonous madhouse becomes the norm.  One feels sick in heart and mind.

Most people sense this, and whether they think of it as nostalgia or not, I believe they feel that something important is missing and that they are wandering like rolling stones, as Dylan voiced it so poetically, with no direction home.

How does it feel? It feels lousy.

So it’s not a question of returning to “the good old days.”  The future beckons.  But if we don’t find a way to rediscover those essential human needs of slowness and silence, to name but two, I am afraid we will find ourselves speeding along into an inferno of our own making, where it’s noisy as hell and not fit for human habitation.

Edward Curtin is an independent writer whose work has appeared widely over many years. His website is edwardcurtin.com and his new book is Seeking Truth in a Country of Lies.

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niko
niko
Feb 8, 2022 8:52 PM

The Withway
free pdf 

“In an ideal state of society one might imagine the good New growing naturally out of the good Old, without the need for polemic and theory; this would be a society with a living tradition” T.S. Eliot

rossgopicotrain
rossgopicotrain
Feb 7, 2022 11:19 PM

A very heartening, hearty and hopeful piece of writing; and one, i hope, many will read and ponder due to its inherent insights and relevance! One other thing: in perusing this article, i could not help but be reminded of the novelist who wrote his master piece vis-a-vis said topic of nostalgia – and concomitant associated realms of space and time – namely, Marcel Proust (i.e., his magnum opus: ‘In Search of Lost Time’/’Remembrance of Things Past); and although i’ve never managed to make my way through all 5 volumes of the translation i currently own, each and every word emanating from you pen (or, as the case may be, fingers) conjured up nothing but episode after episode from said novel; which, of course, is most exemplarily symbolized by this passage taken from this masterpiece of classic literature:

“No sooner had the warm liquid mixed with the crumbs touched my palate than a shudder ran through me and I stopped, intent upon the extraordinary thing that was happening to me. An exquisite pleasure had invaded my senses, something isolated, detached, with no suggestion of its origin. And at once the vicissitudes of life had become indifferent to me, its disasters innocuous, its brevity illusory – this new sensation having had on me the effect which love has of filling me with a precious essence; or rather this essence was not in me it was me. … Whence did it come? What did it mean? How could I seize and apprehend it? … And suddenly the memory revealed itself. The taste was that of the little piece of madeleine which on Sunday mornings at Combray (because on those mornings I did not go out before mass), when I went to say good morning to her in her bedroom, my aunt Léonie used to give me, dipping it first in her own cup of tea or tisane. The sight of the little madeleine had recalled nothing to my mind before I tasted it. And all from my cup of tea.”

What can one say subsequent to perusing such beauty, exquisiteness and illumination as represented in this excerpt from said novelist’s work?!? – nothing, except: Thank you to Marcel Proust for creating such art in an era still clinging to the remnants of beauty and aesthetics we’re so utterly devoid of today; and thank you for reminding me – via your above piece – of this fact! RGB-Y2 out!!

Roberto
Roberto
Feb 7, 2022 5:56 PM

Nostalgia is the subjective cleansing of one’s memory of things that occurred in the past with a view to ameliorating current misery, misery as defined by the crisis-creation media and politicians elected to ‘solve problems’ and implement ‘change’.
Objective nostalgia would be the remembrance of the atomic bomb hysteria of the 1950s and children (always the children) being taught to ‘duck and hide’ under their school desks to avoid annihilation, the threat of Strontium 90 (which was in everything) killing everyone, the flouridation of water. Or later, the hole in the ozone layer which would cause everyone to die, soon. Maybe the new Ice Age of the ’70s, like the new Ice Age of the early 1900s, which couldn’t be avoided unless we ‘do something now’, and for which we would need to store food to make it through even though most of the population of the world would succumb.
Cliché/nostalgic references by media to a ‘more innocent time’ presumably overlook the slaughter of hundreds of millions of people for no particular reason other than a few ‘leaders’ who wished to overcome feelings of inadequacy and felt necessary to demonstrate to the world that they were indeed mighty warriors as they hid from view and issued orders to people who ‘just followed orders’, all in an effort to distract politically from other domestic disasters created by the very same leaders. Perhaps devastating economic depressions created by the same people who promised prosperity for all creating bubbles but delivered only ruin qualify as more innocent times.
Etc etc etc, all in a strange loop.

John Crowther
John Crowther
Feb 7, 2022 9:05 PM
Reply to  Roberto

Yes caught in a constant fear loop that’s exactly how it feels breaking free that’s the difficult part

Howard
Howard
Feb 7, 2022 2:02 PM

The only nostalgia that matters is for the person you were many years ago. And that’s the very thing that can never come again – which is exactly why it’s so important.

Anytime I might be foolish enough to think “If only I had it to do over!” I snap myself out of it by reminding myself it’s only because of things I did years ago that I’m where I am now.

One’s past should always be cherished – not always the things that were done to you by others, but the things you did.

Sometimes I may think “I want to outlive anyone who ever witnessed me doing something stupid.” But that’s a mighty long list.

(And given some of my comments, that list might include OffG readers.)

Tom Welsh
Tom Welsh
Feb 7, 2022 12:28 PM

‘You cannot repeat an experience, despite F. Scott Fitzgerald writing:  “You can’t repeat the past?…Why of course you can.”’

Thomas Wolfe, a better writer, said more wisely “You can’t go home again”. You can, if you wish, revisit your childhood home – but be prepared for it to be a disappointment. Many of the beloved landmarks will have gone, but above all the people will have gone or changed.

Sekstans
Sekstans
Feb 7, 2022 10:23 AM

A wonderful reflection, capturing the state of mind of many of us OffG readers and friends. I was very touched because you so accurately capture my thoughts and feelings about what is happening in the world with this quasi-pandemic and indeed more… For a year and a half I have not watched, listened to or read what the MSM would like to catapult, lie and deceive me with. Am I happier? I do not know. But I am certainly calmer. Also thanks to texts like yours and wonderful, wise comments from OffG fans. Thank you. 
I apologise for the inaccuracy of the language. I don’t know the English language. I am helped by the Deepl…

Thinktwice
Thinktwice
Feb 7, 2022 9:02 AM

The future is made in the classroom

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red_squirrel
red_squirrel
Feb 7, 2022 2:33 AM

Lovely article, Thanks Ed.
There is a way to escape, at least for a while: Turn off your little digital demons. Maybe go to a place with trees and plants or even genuine wild nature. Try it, it helps.

Dayne
Dayne
Feb 7, 2022 1:50 AM

When I was a kid, in the 1970s, there was a pocket-size Atlas of the World that came out every year. It listed all countries, their capital cities, etc. etc. I would look at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and think to myself, “This place is so exotic, and so far away, I bet I will never ever have the chance to visit there!”

In the end, I spent all of my adult life in Kuala Lumpur (“KL”, as it’s known locally and around the region). Not by design, mind you. Just one thing leading to another – a work opportunity in nearby Singapore, a Malaysian person I met online and spent 18 years with, till death did us part. The happiest moments, and the most tragic ones, they all took place in KL. Which has now been closed off to foreigners and travellers for the past two years, and will likely never again accept non-jabbed individuals such as myself. So yes, I am deeply nostalgic.

Jojo
Jojo
Feb 7, 2022 8:43 AM
Reply to  Dayne

“Which has now been closed off to foreigners and travelers for the past two years, and will likely never again accept non-jabbed individuals such as myself.”
——-
Why doesn’t anyone, from commenters to reporters, pose the question to all the mandate imposing governments as to what is the purpose of the mandates, given that the CoVax shots DO NOT PREVENT virus TRANSMISSION?

As her majesty, the CDC Director said some months back:

   Oct 2, 2021 – “Our vaccines are working exceptionally well. They continue to work well for Delta with regard to severe illness and death – they prevent it, but what they can’t do anymore is prevent transmission,” CDC Director Rochelle Walensky told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer.

Whenever anyone gets the opportunity to interact with government bureaucrats or reports, ask this question!

Roberto
Roberto
Feb 9, 2022 6:48 PM
Reply to  Dayne

When I was a kid, in the 1960s I visited Singapore. Bombs were going off, and the Chinese, Indians, and Malaysians were all fighting each other.

les online
les online
Feb 6, 2022 11:33 PM

I have some nostalgia for democracy, feeble thing that it was. (anon).

Martin Usher
Martin Usher
Feb 6, 2022 8:45 PM

The impressions of something are far more potent than the reality. I’ve had many such experiences in my life which is why I’m a really bad tourist — I find it way more interesting to visit a supermarket in a foreign city than the places that tourists normally gather.

The reason for this is that I keep peering behind the curtain. I don’t know Paris but I’m sure that the impression given by the cheese shop is of a ‘pseudo-Paris’, a place that may well exist, a romantic vision but still something disconnected from the everyday life of Parisiennes. The vision may still be there, hidden in plain sight for all to see, but its like living in any tourist destination, its not the whole, just a selective vision. I’ve had numerous experiences like this; currently, for example, I live in a part of the world that features in many movies and advertisements. The image on the screen is crafted to give an impression. The image in real life can have the same impression but if, for example, you’re slogging up and down Pacific Coast Highway every day in traffic Malibu loses a lot of its luster. Its there, but at the same time, not there.

Nostalgia is the same trick but performed in time by memory. The past is always wonderful because we can selectively paint it so that only the good bits remain. You can’t return there, or make America like that again, because it really didn’t exist.

Hamish Dawson
Hamish Dawson
Feb 7, 2022 4:12 AM
Reply to  Martin Usher

I went to Paris for the first time for over 20 years and some things aspects overwhelmingly different and unpleasant, but then again I had cafe au lait and croissants each morning watching the world go by, dropping into a patisserie and relived the things I had been nostalgic about, so I don’t think your spectacles are always so rose-tinted that recapturing things you’ve missed are not possible. I agree, though, about going to supermarkets and the like to get a feel of life for ordinary people in that place. I might have been deceiving myself but I think it was possible to get a feel of a place by staying several hours in certain airports.

Pilgrim Shadow
Pilgrim Shadow
Feb 6, 2022 6:41 PM

Some good old UK punk from 1978:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZkF50iY2nDs

“About the future I only can reminisce
For what I’ve had is what I’ll never get
And although this may sound strange
My future and my past are presently disarranged
And I’m surfing on a wave of nostalgia for an age yet to come”

Kathy
Kathy
Feb 6, 2022 10:37 PM
Reply to  Pilgrim Shadow

You beet me to it!. I was reading this wonderful thought provoking piece and setting aside all the madness and feeling tranquility again. Yet again marveling at how Mr Curtin Always helps me realign with the calm.
In my head started up Nostalgia for an age yet to come. Always loved this song and what it to me represents.
Thank you Mr Curtin for the wonderful writing, and thank you Pilgrim Shadow for posting the song.

Pilgrim Shadow
Pilgrim Shadow
Feb 8, 2022 3:43 AM
Reply to  Kathy

Glad you enjoyed the song Kathy. I think of it almost reflexively every time “nostalgia” is mentioned, and naturally, it brings back nostalgic memories of my own. Back in 1981, I special ordered the “Love Bites” LP (upon which “Nostalgia” is found) from the UK, without having heard a song on it, and had it shipped to my local record store in Clarksville, Indiana. I’ve loved that record for over 40 years now.

Annie
Annie
Feb 6, 2022 6:32 PM

I don’t know if anyone agrees with me and at this point I don’t care,But everything you see hear is your mind you make whatever you see.You are living in your own world thoughts actions its all down to you you can change it mindset.Tv social media are trying to think as a group one entity?!!No that’s all wrong,You create your own reality nobody can see into your mind even though they try.Life is what YOU make it.When we die what do we take?Nothing.You are your own creation nobody can see feel what you do.All I’m saying is life is your stage play on.👍 YOU make the rules to your own destiny nobody else.To wait on a martyr or a saviour is wishful thinking you make the rules you are the only one that is seeing experiencing your life.

Annie
Annie
Feb 6, 2022 6:48 PM
Reply to  Annie

If I want to see the world a shade of yellow I’ll make it happen.Too much indoctrination we are to think everyone sees yellow everyone tastes the same taste this is how bad it’s got to you experience other peoples thoughts feelings and you think that is how it is???No believe me your mind is powerful and it’s yours nobody else’s yours.

Annie
Annie
Feb 6, 2022 6:55 PM
Reply to  Annie

People need to get away from other peoples thoughts on life listen to yours.You came into to this world with nothing.You will experience only your thoughts and point of view and then leave with nothing.

Duckman
Duckman
Feb 7, 2022 8:14 AM
Reply to  Annie

And so when we understand that by our own volition we created what now confronts us and we respect our responsibilities and take on board that these “elected” puppets are no more able to instigate just change than we are to change the rotation of the earth, perhaps then we will find peace within our selves and in radiating that peace we may yet create meaningful change..
Time to feed the Ducks and water the polytunnel, life goes on

Kathy
Kathy
Feb 7, 2022 12:08 PM
Reply to  Annie

Yes I agree with you, we all see and perceive the world in our own unique and individual way. All the education, all the media/social media is pushing everyone into conformity. But it is our individuality that makes us all special. We are all journeying through life on our own path. Every one of us has our own unique experiences.

Listening to the radio last night, there was a program about critical thinking and how to educate children on how to rule out their own instinctive understanding.. To teach them to invalidate their individuality. To make sure they will all learn to think in a uniform way. To bring them in line with one reality. That way they can distinguish between truth and fake news, conspiracy theories and dismiss spiritual beliefs and trust in the science. This brain washing conformity churning out robotic binary minds. As if there is only one way to think, feel, see things or view of the world. How sad this is, when as you say [You are your own creation nobody can see feel what you do].

The Coming Revolution
The Coming Revolution
Feb 6, 2022 6:26 PM

For the sake of humanity, we can’t let the Frankenstein-esque “advances” of technology run wild and get shoved down our throats by puppets of Capital in cahoots with sold-out, despicable and lead-desserving politicians, drunk with the vision of a world population living like clockwork, that is, a population as good as dead. All these people, too accustomed to live outside the bulk of humanity in exclusive clubs, have lost the notion of what it means to be human in practical terms; they have to relearn that spontaneous and unpredictable doesn’t mean dangerous. We may have to knock that understanding into them by force, I’m afraid.

Progress is like fire: under check, it can make your dinner and keep you warm; let it run without check and it’ll make you, yours and everything it finds on its way its dinner. We can’t allow that.

S Cooper
S Cooper
Feb 6, 2022 5:40 PM

comment image

“Any guesses as to what Nazi Boy and the Reich are paying them.”

https://www.reddit.com/r/TakeTheJab/comments/slrd00/aussie_whistleblower_in_the_funeral_industry/

S Cooper
S Cooper
Feb 6, 2022 5:49 PM
Reply to  S Cooper

“Just the Billy Eugenics Cull Juice doing in part what it was intended to do.”
comment image
comment image

“The Scamdemic ‘Big Lie’ is a Crime Against WE THE PEOPLE (Humanity).”

ity
ity
Feb 6, 2022 6:06 PM
Reply to  S Cooper

Thanks for the heads up on the ‘Gateway Pundit’ site; another useful news source, which today has this article, complete with a video featuring Neil Oliver.

“We Failed” – Danish Newspaper Admits Failure and Apologizes for Not Questioning the Government’s COVID-19 Narrative.

ity
ity
Feb 6, 2022 6:08 PM
Reply to  ity
wardropper
wardropper
Feb 6, 2022 9:01 PM
Reply to  ity

I say with Neil Oliver, “I think it’s a bit late”…
If people here at OffG knew two years ago that something was very off, then the world’s mainstream press should have known it too.

What’s worse: As soon as the world has digested this apology, the next Goeringian fear tactic will be stuffed down our throats by the very same media.

They rely, shrewdly, upon the 11-second attention span of the average human today.
But we can’t forget forget that the NWO, the ‘Great Reichsetz’ and the Creeping Censorship of the New Normal will not go away voluntarily.

They are too heavily invested for that.

Which means we must not fail in the same way as the media did – out of sheer sleepiness, lethargy and boredom.

ity
ity
Feb 6, 2022 9:35 PM
Reply to  wardropper

Yes, of course you’re right to a large degree. But I still can’t help but be a little cheered by any cracks that appear. I’m grabbing at the crumbs of comfort where I can.

And to be honest, I’m a little guilty of the whole sleepiness and lethargy thing. I’ll never cave in or surrender, and will fight this till my bitter end, but I reach for distractions on a daily basis. It’s how I survive.

But perhaps I could be doing more. Perhaps I should be doing more.

Sloth is certainly a problem.

wardropper
wardropper
Feb 8, 2022 5:35 AM
Reply to  ity

I totally get that, ity.
But a good hobby – or even a professional passion – can also be a ‘distraction’, with no need for a guilty conscience at all.

I would describe what I do, for example, as just keeping busy.
For me that means that my life IS normal, and I’m doing something creative and useful with it too.

I recommend finding something to be passionate about – probably best if it is totally unrelated to, or affected by, the current lunacy.

Even reading good literature takes one out of oneself enough to be able to think freely. I reckon that’s the key.

jubal hershaw
jubal hershaw
Feb 6, 2022 10:45 PM
Reply to  wardropper

Please dont write anything longer than eleven seconds ?

New Name
New Name
Feb 7, 2022 12:58 AM
Reply to  wardropper

The media did not fail. It succeeded as it was mean’t to in dragging mankind into the whirlpool of doom. The media does the work it’s masters the banksters demand of it. They now want us culled.

George Mc
George Mc
Feb 6, 2022 7:00 PM
Reply to  S Cooper

I wonder if they are aware that honk can also mean vomit? Kinda gives the messages a different spin!

Annie
Annie
Feb 6, 2022 8:29 PM
Reply to  S Cooper

👍

The Coming Revolution
The Coming Revolution
Feb 6, 2022 5:29 PM
Technocracy Unsustainable
Technocracy Unsustainable
Feb 6, 2022 4:37 PM

One of the best films that captures the essence of nostalgia is Cinema Paradiso. The story, the music, fills the heart to bursting with the memory of an encapsulated moment of time when there was less traffic sound, less bustle, just time to cultivate friendships, small magical moments like watching lovers on celluloid projected outside on a wall for all to share. Old friends are the gifts that keep on giving. Take the time to nurture them, because in the end, love is always what humanity is searching for.

Paul Vonharnish
Paul Vonharnish
Feb 6, 2022 4:35 PM

The picture of the young man staring into the sea is poignant, yet… When I see the younger people we’ve created in recent years, I see nothing but animated corpses. They have no future, and they know it…

Viva le corporation. We need more profits…

S Cooper
S Cooper
Feb 6, 2022 3:02 PM

comment image
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S Cooper
S Cooper
Feb 6, 2022 3:13 PM
Reply to  S Cooper

comment image

“Politically what exists today in many parts of the world is a large criminal gang of war racketeering corporate fascist psychopaths passing themselves off as “government,” preying upon (and victimizing) the rest of hapless humanity. If only there was honest government of the people,by the people, for the people, based on the principles of equality (political/economic/social)civil liberty, respect and peace.”

https://www.marxists.org/archive/debs/works/1918/court.htm

Howard
Howard
Feb 6, 2022 3:30 PM
Reply to  S Cooper

Yes, and the good Western consumers are getting sooo tired of paying for shipping Asian Slave-made Goods to their neighborhood Walmart – that they’ve decided to enslave themselves and make the goods here and save shipping costs.

Smart huh?

Edith
Edith
Feb 6, 2022 7:31 PM
Reply to  S Cooper

Yes the rather large elephant in the room never talked about…the media can go about discrimination, refugees etc but rarely does the plight of the asians making cheap goods, the pollution levels of their lives etc get brought home…

western economies have been propped up by this for some time now…

and we now want an even higher price to be paid by 3 world…they have to reduce the pollution we forced upon them….no doubt pay for that too.

NickM
NickM
Feb 6, 2022 2:49 PM

“Nostalgia — from Greek “nostos” home and “algos” pain.

Thanks for the etymology. Reminds us that two of the greatest Western epics are about a homecoming: The Odyssey and The Old Testament.

Vagabard
Vagabard
Feb 6, 2022 2:54 PM
Reply to  NickM

Thought that was good too. That ‘nostalgia’ and ‘homesickness’ are essentially the same

Odysseus
Odysseus
Feb 6, 2022 6:23 PM
Reply to  NickM

Indeed. It’s odd that nostalgia has come to refer to a melancholic separation from a pleasurable time in the past rather than an ongoing separation from the “home” of our deeper self in every moment. Jung understood this.

les online
les online
Feb 6, 2022 11:01 PM
Reply to  Odysseus

Carl Jung. Under the Nazi took over as head of the (Freud’s) Psychoanalysis Association. Nazified it. Expelled all Jewish analysts. (Probably advised Dr Josef Goebbels on propaganda ?) Survived the war smelling of roses. The Nazi had no disagreements with Carl Jung’s theories. Other analysts had their books burnt, their names put on Nazi Death Lists. They had to flee their home country. Not Carl Jung.

Sam - Admin2
Admin
Sam - Admin2
Feb 6, 2022 11:41 PM
Reply to  les online

Interesting. I’d be interested to read more about this, if you have a link. A2

NickM
NickM
Feb 7, 2022 7:48 AM
Reply to  Sam - Admin2

Seconded.

Heidegger was another academic who retained his post under the Nazis yet emerged smelling of roses. Christian Existentialist philosopher Karl Jaspers could not understand it. The Heidegger-Jaspers Correspondence (1920-1963) Contemporary Studies in Philosophy and the Human Sciences.)

les online
les online
Feb 8, 2022 6:44 AM
Reply to  Sam - Admin2

The claim that Jung was head of the PA during the Nazi’s reign is very doubtful. I included it expecting it to be challenged or clarified. Jung’s Scientific Mysticism / Mystical Scientism was agreeable to those mystical minded hierarchs in the Nazi Party.
Wiki provides a bare outline of Jung’s ideas. However, in 1933 Dr Wilhelm Reich wrote, ‘Jung has appeared of late as the spokesman for fascism within psychoanalysis. The International Psychoanalytical Association is completely unaware of the social-cultural significance and origins of these developments: rather it resists their exposure.’ (Sex-Pol Essays. Baxandall (ed)….’On the “right-wing” of psychoanalysis. Carl Jung’s psychology soon became an obscurantist pseudo-mythology.’ Eros and Civilisation. Herbert Marcuse…
Jung is very popular among New Age ideologues and his ideas are promoted in their periodicals…

les online
les online
Feb 8, 2022 7:16 AM
Reply to  Sam - Admin2

The claim that Jung was head of the PA during the Nazi’s reign is very doubtful. I included it expecting it to be challenged or clarified. Jung’s Scientific Mysticism / Mystical Scientism would have been agreeable to those mystical minded hierarchs in the Nazi Party. Wiki provides a bare outline of Jung’s ideas. In 1933, however, Dr Wilhelm Reich wrote “Jung has appeared of late as a spokesman for fascism within psychanalysis. The International Psychoanalytical Association is completely unaware of the social-cultural significance and origins of these developments: rather it resists their exposure.’…(Reich’s) Sex-Pol Essays, Baxandall (ed)…’On the “right wing” Carl Jung’s psychology soon became an obscurantist pseudo-mythology.’ .Eros and Civilisation byHerbert Marcuse…
Jung is very popular amongst New Age ideologues, who promote his ideas in their periodicals.

Sebastian
Sebastian
Feb 6, 2022 7:08 PM
Reply to  NickM

Good comments all.

Vagabard
Vagabard
Feb 6, 2022 2:38 PM

It is odd that many of the things we get nostalgic about were actually future-orientated at the time. Like a book or film that once inspired aspirational dreams of adventure and travel.

A quaint memory of the past that once gave wings to dreams

Clive Williams
Clive Williams
Feb 6, 2022 4:39 PM
Reply to  Vagabard

Not sure of Edwards age but I more often agree with the idea.
He mentioned some absolutes; Taste, Smell, Sight, Sound… A Song..A Yearning.
How on Earth is that possible governed in a World run off Computerisation.
My guess Edward is talking of say, pre 1985?
Anti-social people on social media Hate/Love anything and everything, no wonder people switch off;

So there is hope after the obsessively compulsion over reality Robotic failure. Course it will fail, Digital Computerisation isn’t Real.
Bad Taste, Smell, Sight, Sound…bad bad Song and no future in computer appeasement modelling language…ism.

Vagabard
Vagabard
Feb 7, 2022 6:25 PM
Reply to  Clive Williams

The digital world is a world of sight & sound. Taste, smell, touch still being the preserve of the ‘real world’. A lack of intimacy is built into the nature of the medium itself.

‘The medium is the lack of massage’, as Marshall McLuhan might have said

So the Covid saga is, in some sense, simply a promotion of the nature of the medium. Physical contact denigrated.

Nostalgia could well be for the pre-Internet ’80s era.

When television was the dominant medium, accompanied by radio. When interaction with others generally meant meeting them physically. When telephones at least carried the nuances of voice, unlike the text exchanges of social media. Less open to misinterpretation.

One day presumably, a new dominant medium will supercede the Internet/Social media. Maybe it will prove to be better. Or maybe it will prove to be the real world in the spirit of Romanticism  🤔 

Howard
Howard
Feb 6, 2022 1:49 PM

A good parlor trick is asking around: What’s the most important: past, present or future?

The smart, with-it answer is of course: present.

Some might grudgingly say: future.

Almost no one will say: past.

And yet, when we leave this life, this world, this plane, we take one thing and one thing only with us: our past. That’s the only thing in existence we can truly call our own.

You may think you left your past behind you long ago; but it’s still there, following you. Kind of like the quip a heavy set person might kiddingly hear: “I lost 10 pounds!” “Turn around, you’ll find it!”

Thinktwice
Thinktwice
Feb 6, 2022 12:37 PM

“COVID vaccines lose power like batteries” !!!
If they would have stated this BEFORE the injections…

comment image

George Mc
George Mc
Feb 6, 2022 1:47 PM
Reply to  Thinktwice

Help me out here. Is that poster a piss take or not?

ity
ity
Feb 6, 2022 2:43 PM
Reply to  George Mc

If I may answer for Thinktwice, then no, it isn’t a piss take. The above image is cropped from a photograph that I saw a few days ago in (I think) the Guardian. The original photograph (from memory) showed what looked to be a London scene, and featured a park, a road, and a passing cyclist or pedestrian.

Thinktwice
Thinktwice
Feb 6, 2022 7:05 PM
Reply to  ity

confirmed

NickM
NickM
Feb 6, 2022 2:44 PM
Reply to  George Mc

It’s Con-19 laughing at the public: You suckers!

ity
ity
Feb 6, 2022 2:51 PM
Reply to  NickM

Ha! … I just came back to add to my comment above, because while it’s not a piss take, they are certainly taking the piss. So it’s both a piss take and not a piss take. What we have here is a Schrodinger piss take.

bunkin
bunkin
Feb 6, 2022 3:07 PM
Reply to  ity

at least they got the comparison between vaccines and batteries right – both toxic

Hemlockfen
Hemlockfen
Feb 6, 2022 2:55 PM
Reply to  George Mc

Then they leak into the ground and poison the drinking water.

Peytoia
Peytoia
Feb 6, 2022 6:16 PM
Reply to  George Mc

Well, lbhf is Hammersmith and Fulham. I’m guessing it’s real.

hotrod31
hotrod31
Feb 7, 2022 1:09 AM
Reply to  George Mc

Thinktwice: If I can intrude … I would hazard a guess and suggest that the whole Pandemic-psyop has actually been a ‘piss-take’ … on the rest of us. You might have viewed a video interview featuring Albert Ballsup, from Pfizer actually saying to an interviewer; that he hasn’t had the Pfizer ‘vaccine’ because he doesn’t want to ‘jump-the-queue’. Forking hilarious. Now any moron still falling for this idiotic injection-trickery … deserves 3 shots, or as many as they want.

les online
les online
Feb 6, 2022 11:11 PM
Reply to  Thinktwice

SHOCK gets attention. In Advertising there is no morality. Or, when SHOCK is the intention, morality cant compete…
If It Gets Your Attention, Then You’ll Remember It…

Jojo
Jojo
Feb 7, 2022 8:51 AM
Reply to  Thinktwice

Ha! They plagiarized me. I used this analogy a few weeks ago on an NYT posting. I also use a similar one about tires, how they don’t stop as well with 10k+ miles o them as they do when new.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
Feb 6, 2022 12:35 PM

good article .. even if they can’ publish must some of my fave authors, writing about corruption and corporate takeover for years/decades reall embrace all of this 🙁

Fake news, fake art, fake everything – The Conservative Woman

NixonScraypes
NixonScraypes
Feb 6, 2022 11:53 AM

Yes, all that noise. I think that’s the reason I never got a mobile phone. So many people tell me to get one; they tell me to get vaxed as well. Somehow I never get round to it.

Bill Francis
Bill Francis
Feb 6, 2022 1:12 PM
Reply to  NixonScraypes

I had a mobile phone once – for business. I used it two or three times, then gave it away. I didn’t need it, and all I was doing was donating to a telephone company. Still don’t have one, and can’t have a vaccine passport. Hooray. I’m not so easy to track. At least I still keep a little bit of privacy.

Hemlockfen
Hemlockfen
Feb 6, 2022 5:43 PM
Reply to  NixonScraypes

Won’t be long before phones are free and mandatory. 5G technology phones themselves are already free. Low elevation towers will be on every corner and 1/2 way down every block. Radiation levels are expected to be off the charts. Just like vaccine safety, disinformation on effects of the radiation is being heavily downplayed.

les online
les online
Feb 6, 2022 11:17 PM
Reply to  Hemlockfen

But No Worries. There’s more profit-booster shots in the pipeline. If they cant protect you from the radiation – you’ll have Died With ‘Covid’.

mgeo
mgeo
Feb 7, 2022 7:49 AM
Reply to  Hemlockfen

There will be tens of thousands of satellites as low as 320 km up, with another business planning balloons in the stratosphere (far lower). The satellites will transmit microwave/RF at 10.7-12.7 Ghz, and the (few) ground stations at 14-14.5 GHz; in comparison, current LTE network utilise 0.7-6 GHz. There will be millions of ground (street) antennae.

John Gabriel Otvos
John Gabriel Otvos
Feb 6, 2022 11:18 AM

It’s all just Yankee capitalism in a vain attempt to protect what’s left of their empire; aided and abetted by the likes of BoJo in the UK, helplessly trying to resurrect Britain’s failed Empire and ScoMo Downunder, going along to get along.

Then there’s our illustrious merchant of nonsense, Just~Inn~Thyme True~Dough here, north of the 49th, doing the bidding of his handlers, fallin’ into lockstep with the southern warlords, with nary an original thought spoken publicly. One wonders how his intelligent, dear suffering wife, Sophie Gregoire, has put up with him all these years he’s been at the helm of our own sinking ship of fate.

Perhaps we as a species may return to the unspeakable 6th mass extinction of the car culture, the real reason why the west is responsible for the drugs from Columbia and Afghanistan, let alone the animal food diet that is responsible for the destruction of the Amazon rainforest. Make no mistake, folks, whether lab-leak [most probable] or species jump, this pestilence is zoonotic in origin. Deal with your lifestyle diseases. I’ve had my cancer. Have you had yours yet?

Orthus
Orthus
Feb 6, 2022 3:19 PM

Well, Bozo is a true Yankee, born in NYC.

New Name
New Name
Feb 7, 2022 1:07 AM

Convid 1984 is almost certainly a hoax.

Marilyn Shepherd
Marilyn Shepherd
Feb 6, 2022 10:46 AM

In South Australia now after months of hysterically telling everyone to be jabbed they now tell all people under 65 if they ”test positive” they should stay home, take a panadol and drink plenty.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
Feb 6, 2022 12:29 PM

until…

Edith
Edith
Feb 6, 2022 7:43 PM

Gee it is almost like they knew the needles didn’t work at all…funny that ….one of them must have read the pfyser trial report where it states less than 1% ….but get bolstered anyway…got to keep this system going or there would be very high unemployment…I.e what would all those people employed jabbing, testing actually do without the magical virus.

New Name
New Name
Feb 7, 2022 1:09 AM
Reply to  Edith

The needles worked fine. I estimate they have killed 1.5 million people already.

Mark EL
Mark EL
Feb 6, 2022 10:13 AM

We’re so busy, just rushing about
We haven’t any patience, we’re all stressing out
We’re so busy we don’t have time to wait
Manic activity is now our natural state

We’re so busy and isn’t it funny
We waste so much time just chasing money
We’re so busy and yet we’re all in debt
Making us so busy is the best con yet

We’re so busy we’ve no time to sit and stare
Except at endless screens located everywhere
We’re so busy we don’t have time to blink
Most of us are happy that there’s no time to think

Chorus:
We’re so busy
And doesn’t time fly
We should use it wisely
Before we die 

https://leaderleader.bandcamp.com/track/were-so-busy

The Coming Revolution
The Coming Revolution
Feb 6, 2022 4:31 PM
Reply to  Mark EL

+1

Edwige
Edwige
Feb 6, 2022 10:05 AM

‘The Great Reset’ is meant to be a Year Zero, the dawning of a new aeon. Other attempts to declare a Year Zero were the French Revolution and Mussolini’s Italy – how did they turn out?

The other extreme can be weaponised too. When the CIA was questioning how to reconcile the public to the prospect of nuclear annihilation, they turned to Gregory Bateson and he argued that the Soviets had reconciled Siberian native peoples to communism through an “archaic revival”, a superficial respecting of older traditions that tailored them to the needs of the new regime. The Laurel Canyon ‘folk rock’ of the 1960s came out of that – it appeared to build on the folk tradition while steering it into electronic music and ultimately technocracy. The song lyrics appeared to be radical – but when looked at closely, they avoided every important topic. But that Stephen Stills looked good in his jacket and stetson….

Dr Justin
Dr Justin
Feb 6, 2022 11:08 AM
Reply to  Edwige

“In 1975, the Khmer Rouge forces took over Phnom Penh, the capital of Cambodia (subsequently renamed Democratic Kampuchea, 1975-79).[5] Upon seizing power, Year Zero was decreed.[3]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_Zero_(political_notion)

Year Zero – just another name for mass murder.

George Mc
George Mc
Feb 6, 2022 11:17 AM
Reply to  Edwige

According to Dave McGowan, Buffalo Springfield’s “For What It’s Worth” was actually about a bunch of kids whining about having one of their hangouts closed. It figures.

Marilyn Shepherd
Marilyn Shepherd
Feb 6, 2022 11:27 AM
Reply to  George Mc

Inside Buffalo Springfield’s Anthem To The Sunset Strip Curfew Riots : NPR A teensy bit more serious than that, it was the start of cops dressed like military thugs attacking teenagers – don’t try to buy into the trivialising of what was a very dangerous situation

George Mc
George Mc
Feb 6, 2022 11:58 AM

Well Steve Stills seems to regard it as a bit of a larf when the Smothers Brothers take the piss here (30 seconds in):

Marilyn Shepherd
Marilyn Shepherd
Feb 6, 2022 12:23 PM
Reply to  George Mc

Well Steve was always a joker, the cruelty against those kids was horrific and led the way to cops getting away with worse during the anti war and then onto the Kent State massacre in Ohio. I remember it all vividly thanks anyway.

George Mc
George Mc
Feb 6, 2022 1:34 PM

For all that I’ve said, I still consider Neil Young one of the finest songwriters I’ve heard. He had the gift of evocative simplicity. Who else could have come up with such a bewildering mixture of the beautiful, the silly and the sinister as this?:

He came dancing across the water

With his galleons and guns

Howard
Howard
Feb 6, 2022 3:20 PM
Reply to  George Mc

Good refrain. I was never into Neil Young – it’s only recently I’ve heard his “After the Goldrush.” BTW, what song is that refrain from?

But, apropos of the article by Mr Curtin, we seem nowadays to have turned nostalgia on its head. Rather than interpreting the present in terms of the past, we re-invent the past based on what happens today.

Very – very – few are able to survive celebrity status. It seems to completely warp their perspective – even their view of their own earlier work. And that’s sad.

Igor
Igor
Feb 6, 2022 5:41 PM
Reply to  Howard

MY reply above your reply was meant for you.

Hemlockfen
Hemlockfen
Feb 6, 2022 5:55 PM
Reply to  Howard

Neil Young has changed. He is no longer who we thought he was. I sincerely don’t get it. Same for Mitchel and other celebrities. Malone must be right. Mass Formation Psychosis (Covidian Cult). All this time. All the new irrefutable information leaking into the mainstream but yet none of them are able to lower their guard and become objective any more. Is it laziness?

Dosamuno
Dosamuno
Feb 6, 2022 6:55 PM
Reply to  Hemlockfen

If it’s any consolation, Hemlockfen, I don’t get it either.

George Mc
George Mc
Feb 6, 2022 7:04 PM
Reply to  Howard

It’s from Cortez the Killer.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uX9k9aoX6gk

Typically perverse Neil STARTS with the extended guitar.

martin
martin
Feb 7, 2022 11:41 AM
Reply to  Howard

Nostalgia ain’t what it used to be,,,

Igor
Igor
Feb 6, 2022 5:37 PM
Reply to  George Mc
Dosamuno
Dosamuno
Feb 6, 2022 6:54 PM

Marilyn,

I grew up in the 60s and 70s.
When I hear this song, my heart aches and my blood boils.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCS-g3HwXdc

Neil Young wrote it and I’ll never forget it.
Right now I’m pissed at him, but not so pissed that I can forget that he wrote this song that so precisely expressed our rage.

Edith
Edith
Feb 6, 2022 7:52 PM
Reply to  Dosamuno

One of the odd things about now has been watching old friends who were actually at some of those protests in that song clip, buckle immediately and without question when the covid scam hit….it was weird to watch ….so at some level I am not surprised at the likes of Young etal buying the line……

perhaps when young death was remote….now it is around every corner..

Dosamuno
Dosamuno
Feb 6, 2022 9:41 PM
Reply to  Edith

Yup.

I Will Not Be Young Again

Later on, one began to realize                                             that life was not just a party.                                                   Like young people everywhere, I had come                                to conquer the world before me.  

I wanted to make a name for myself                                     and walk off stage to applause:                                                 Getting old and dying were just                                       conventional plots of shows.

But time has passed, and, alas,                                           the disagreeable truth is before me.                        Getting old and dying                                                is the only plot of the story.

(Poem by Jaime Gil de Biedma.) 

Dosamuno
Dosamuno
Feb 6, 2022 10:05 PM
Reply to  Dosamuno

Poem got mutilated when I posted it.
Lines should end with slashes:

I Will Not Be Young Again

Later on, one began to realize/                                              that life was not just a party./                                                   Like young people everywhere, I had come/                                to conquer the world before me./  
I wanted to make a name for myself/                                      and walk off stage to applause:/                                                 Getting old and dying were just/                                       conventional tales of shows./
But time has passed, and, alas,/                                           the disagreeable truth is before me./                        Getting old and dying/                                                            is the only plot of the story./

Original in Spanish:

https://ciudadseva.com/texto/no-volvere-a-ser-joven/

NixonScraypes
NixonScraypes
Feb 6, 2022 11:59 AM
Reply to  Edwige

I think that’s a tried and tested technique. I’ve heard that John Dee sent agents to Wales to collect folk songs so the lyrics could be subtly altered to push the desired social paradigm.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
Feb 6, 2022 12:33 PM
Reply to  Edwige

personally i am scared of the counter revolutionary backlash because of some of the online comments i’ve read. fundamentalist christians, mra, and so on.

Igor
Igor
Feb 6, 2022 5:39 PM
Reply to  sabelmouse

Fundamental anything is doubleplus ungood.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
Feb 7, 2022 11:31 AM
Reply to  Igor

yes.

Orthus
Orthus
Feb 6, 2022 3:24 PM
Reply to  Edwige

Have you forgotten Pol Pot?

les online
les online
Feb 6, 2022 10:04 AM

I’ve a newspaper cutting, from years ago:

‘When American journalist Lincoln Steffens went to Moscow in 1919, he pronounced, “I have seen the future – and it works.” I wish he’d been right, and not just another fellow traveller wowed by the sight of a few new apartment blocks. Instead i have to be satisfied with nostalgia for a future that never happened.’ (author not recorded)

I’ve been heading into The Future all my life. I look back and all i see is The Future i’d been heading towards all my life…

‘The future is a harsh mistress.’ (anon)

New Name
New Name
Feb 7, 2022 1:14 AM
Reply to  les online

Didn’t Steffens accompany Bronstein/ Trotsky ?

les online
les online
Feb 7, 2022 3:07 AM
Reply to  New Name

It was, according to Wiki, (joseph) Lincoln Steffens (USA) who went to Russia, 1919, then uttered “I have seen the future, and it works.”
i’ve often wondered who was the author being quoted…
Thanks for that…

MBJ
MBJ
Feb 6, 2022 9:49 AM

A theme in the ‘beeping trivia’ lately has been celebs who crossed the line. Rogan, Goldberg and Jimmy Carr. There have been earlier examples, but this is the first time I think that three celebs are accused of having foot in mouth syndrome. What next in this absurd play? James Corden calling someone a ‘dyke’?

Howard
Howard
Feb 6, 2022 3:26 PM
Reply to  MBJ

The big question is: how come anyone knew they crossed the line? Or to state it another way: you mean people actually pay attention to anything they say?