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Canadian Conviviality vs. Global Helplessness

Sinead Murphy

Image – Bob Moran [twitter][website]

The showdown between Trudeau and the truckers has shown the real nature of a war that is by now quite obviously not about a virus.

On 17th February, in an article at Brownstone Institute, David McGrogan described the Trudeau-trucker stand-off as not only ‘the single most significant event of the Covid pandemic’ but as illuminating ‘the core conflict of our age.’

David defined this conflict as between state and society, with states across the world posing as guarantors of security and incubators of expertise in contrast with the allegedly extremist defense of human freedom and allegedly anachronistic attachment to human interaction that are, or have been, promoted by alternative sources of authority to that of the state – the family, the firm, the church, the individual.

David’s insightful description of the core conflict of our age might profitably be reframed as a conflict not so much between state and society as between the less politically aligned phenomena of helplessness and conviviality.

The term ‘conviviality’ here comes from Ivan Illich’s Tools for Conviviality (1973). In this book, Illich described convivial communities as those in which are made available an array of ‘tools’ – institutions, devices, systems, networks, routines – which optimize people’s autonomous investment of their energies in pursuit of their ends.

A convivial society is one that facilitates rather than stifles our creative commitments and capabilities.

An example: In The Coming Insurrection (2007), The Invisible Committee made reference to the event of Hurricane Katrina.

They claimed that this disaster quickly caused to crystallize, around the ad hoc street kitchens, supplies stores, medical clinics and house building projects that sprang up, the amount and efficacy of practical knowledge that had been accumulated here and there over the course of lives lived – ‘far from the uniforms and the sirens,’ as The Invisible Committee wrote.

They continued:

Whoever knew the penniless joy of these New Orleans neighbourhoods before the catastrophe, their defiance towards the state and the widespread practice of making do with what’s available wouldn’t be at all surprised by what became possible there. On the other hand, anyone trapped in the anaemic and atomized everyday routine of our residential deserts might doubt that such determination could be found anywhere anymore.

According to the French collective, Hurricane Katrina was an outrage to the establishment and to the norms with which it transmits helplessness among its people, for blowing the cover on what Illich described as an ‘abundance of competence,’ that is, on the extent to which some communities continue to cultivate the convivial possibility of ‘autonomous and creative intercourse among persons and of persons with their environment’.

Convivial communities are directly at odds with the hubs of growing dependency that have been revealed, by Covid at least, as the globalists’ vision for future ‘democratic’ societies.

Such communities foster not only the willingness but the capability to make do with what’s available in pursuit of purposes and by expenditure of energies that are fully under people’s control.

The Canadian truckers – typically self-employed, accustomed to travelling along the margins of the society to which they deliver, tight-knit and with time on their hands for listening to news of the world and for debate, accustomed to meeting adverse conditions and dealing with contingencies alone or with the support of their fellows – comprise one of the last frontiers of conviviality in our milieux; as David described them:

almost the last bastion of self-sufficiency and independence in a modern society…the type of people who, seeing a problem, tend to want to find a solution for themselves.”

Justin Trudeau – groomed, slick, WEF-born emitter of the latest sound-bites and now indisputably craven in his desire to exert control over helpless herds – is one of the foremost puppets of the global project for the eradication of conviviality by institutions, devices, systems and programs all designed to intensify our condition of dependency under the aegis of progress, turning us, as Illich warned, into mere ‘accessories of bureaucracies or machines.’

*

According to Illich, modern societies tend to ‘optimize the output of large tools for lifeless people.’ Such tools – certification systems, screening programmes, end-of-life pathways, to name a few – have the effect of providing ‘best-practice’ ‘solutions’ to human life recast as a set of problems and needs, in the process alienating us from the energy and competence required for us to realize ends of our own choosing.

Covid lockdowns surely exacerbated this effect – prising people away from the last of their autonomously directed energies. But they also revealed the extent to which this effect was already in place.

The shutting of schools in March 2020 has been rightly lambasted as a direct assault upon the learning opportunities due to our children. Studies are now showing that the children of Covid have been hindered in their development by the suspension of their education.

What is also regrettable, though, is that almost everyone has appeared to judge that, unless children are submitted to educational institutions, the possibility of their learning anything is all but non-existent.

And yet, a moment’s reflection is enough to establish that most of what we know was learnt, and fairly effortlessly, outside of the formal school system, in happenstance ways, by observing others, by trial and error, by guerilla consultation of informative literature, and so on.

The primary effect of our educational institutions, then, is not to teach us what we will know but to implant a lack of confidence in our own capacities, and in those of our children, to learn from life as it is lived and, when necessary, to gain access to the talents of those among whom we live and from whom we can acquire new understanding and skills.

It is true, when the lockdowns happened many adults in the home were consigned to working and socializing via screens, from which activity children can learn almost nothing by observing or imitating.

But this shows only that the tools with which we are alienated from what ought to be our abundance of competence at teaching and learning are not contained in a single institution but are ever more plural and networked, not easily untangled and rejected or brought under control.

Clearly, ‘our’ NHS is increasingly another of Illich’s ‘large tools for lifeless people,’ who have been so distanced from their own energies and ends that the specter of asymptomatic disease is now a main driver of health policy and of people’s expectations of their health service.

Once asymptomatic disease is accepted as a phenomenon, any last competence that we have, even at identifying whether we are sick, never mind at treating our own sickness, is eradicated in favour of large and distant instruments operated by designated professionals.

Add to this the growing consensus that immunity is an achievement best produced synthetically by the ministrations of massive health systems and the pharmaceutical industries with which they are allied, rather than by naturally existing biological defences enhanced by easily accessible understanding and products, such as good food, rest, established and cheap vitamin supplements and, yes, the odd ‘boosting’ infection – and we are fast entering a condition of such total dependency on the tools wielded by government institutions and businesses over which we have no influence that our competence in overcoming even a cold will no longer be ‘common’ but overseen and managed from afar.

A convivial society, according to Illich, is one that ‘allows all its members the most autonomous action by means of tools least controlled by others.’

In a convivial society, progress in education should mean growing competence in the easy edification of ourselves and our children, both by the intensity and reality of our own involvements and by the accessibility of other talents for purposes of modelling and instruction, rather than a growing dependence on the ever-changing standards and curricula of institutions that never stop increasing their requirement for enrolment.

In a convivial society, progress in health should mean growing competence in our self-care and our nurture of those around us rather than growing dependence on the judgements and products of an ever more remote service.

*

Education and health do not now promote conviviality, but rather the helplessness of the populations to which they are provided as services. And certainly, in the UK at least, they are largely run by the state.

Why not accept David’s suggestion, then, that the core conflict of our age is that between the state and those alternative sources of authority that still constitute what we might term ‘society’?

Because this would be to overlook that the state does not have a monopoly on the war against conviviality, and that it is the war against conviviality that is the core conflict of our age.

Take two sources of authority that were named by David in his article as alternatives to the state: the family and the individual. Examined for their effect on conviviality, both are subject to doubt as to their contribution to human flourishing even if they also represent a real buttress against the encroachment of state power.

According to Illich, the subject of human history around which conviviality has historically been woven has not been the individual, nor indeed the family, but rather the kinship group – the extended family, we might describe it as.

Insofar as the ‘nuclear’ family and the individual have amounted to the destruction of the kinship group, they have arguably done almost as much to destroy possibilities for conviviality as has the state and its massive instruments of control.

A real shock of the Covid era was the subjection of the most vulnerable among us to the revoking of care, so much of which was starkly revealed as taking place outside of the family home – old people and those with disabilities either stranded in care homes or rejected from care homes, and young children excluded from early years’ settings.

The exposure of these frail and fragile groups to the whims of state power has been truly demoralizing. Yet, though it is easy to dream of how much better things would be were our vulnerable people to be cared for by family in family homes, the question is whether the family actively erodes this convivial option in many ways.

The nuclear family, or the ‘family unit,’ which we now take for granted was largely a construct of the industrial age, an age in which every man’s house – no matter how modest – was his fortress-castle, the large balconied windows of pre-industrial residential architecture giving way to the small, heavily-draped, inward-oriented apertures of the Victorian street.

In tandem with this enclosure of the family unit, the woman of the house emerged as primary, or sole, carer of all who needed care – replacing the abundance of care that had circulated in the looser arrangement of the kinship group or village community.

As with all assaults upon conviviality, the family unit created scarcity from what had been plentiful.

It is easy now to object to the submission of dependent family members to state institutions. It is easy to posit the nuclear family in its cosy home as having the responsibility of caring for its own.

But it is precisely the nuclear character of the nuclear family, precisely the cosiness of their cosy home, that can be detrimental to the abundance of care characteristic of convivial communities; if the family unit does undertake the care of its own, it does so mostly under conditions that promote a helplessness that must always be overcome and that relentlessly exploit the energies and spirit of certain of its members, mostly women.

As for the alternative source of authority to that of the state, represented by the human individual, certainly we who have been opposed to the Covid swelling of state power have appealed to it again and again in defense of freedoms that ought to be inalienable.

It is also the case, however, that the human individual is an instrument that militates against the autonomous channeling of our energies to serve our ends, a promoter of just that brand of helpless dependency against which we have also relied upon it to offer resistance.

A parallel theme to that of Covid has been that of personal identity. Questions about race and gender have been asked as never before throughout the Covid events. A curious accompanying theme, we might think – but not when we notice that the Covid-accelerated descent into helpless reliance upon mighty tools for ‘solutions’ to our ‘problems’ is further boosted by focus on individuality as identity.

Insofar as our individuality is now advertised as defined by race- and gender-related content – lying deep within us and defining of us, though only to be uncovered and understood by a combination of professional theorizing and medical or quasi-medical interventions – it is a powerful tool for our further removal from the autonomous application of our native energies to our freely chosen projects.

Contradictory though it may seem, given the much-heralded alleged alliance between personal identity and personal liberation, this primary mode in which the human individual is now abroad submits us to self-understanding and life-ambitions that are articulated and administered by professionals, not by ourselves.

One of the effects of reframing the conflict of our age as one between helplessness and conviviality is its promise of welcome departure from a binarism that has proven worse than useless over the past two years – that of Left versus Right.

Both the family and the individual have been rallying points for the political Right, not least during Covid times, for their offer of resistance to a horribly overbearing state, darling of many on the political Left.

But the fact is that there are certain arrangements, certain institutions, certain systems, certain devices – including, in some aspects, the family and the individual – which work to erode conviviality and make us helpless, no matter whether those tools are in the hands of the state, the private sector, a single person, a communal set-up.

Whatever political framework they fit into – Left or Right – they reduce us to dependents, alienated from our own energy and vision, and vulnerable to manipulation and punishment.

It is true that our landscape is clogged now with tools for helplessness – institutions that see after our needs and solve our problems, devices that we can only ever operate and that destroy our creativity but whose atmosphere of convenience and of ‘latest and best’ is very difficult to cut through. How to even imagine a life of conviviality in this landscape, let alone to realize it?

One principle might help us here. It has the merit of being one with which most of us are painfully familiar, having lived under its shadow since the financial crisis of 2008: austerity.

Austerity is taken to mean, and certainly has meant over the past decade and a half, a cutting back on the joys of life, on the ‘inessentials’ – tightening the belt, living more frugally, and so on.

But in the closing paragraph of the introduction to his book on conviviality, Illich mentioned that, for Aquinas, the virtue of austerity is not pitted against joyfulness at all. It is rather the promoter of joyfulness, by identifying and excluding what is destructive of joyfulness.

In accordance with Aquinas’s insight, we might begin to acknowledge that certain tools can and should be rejected, not in some implausible drive for frugality over progress and simplicity over complexity, but rather in pursuit of enhanced freedom and joy, in pursuit of progress in other words.

*

What the truckers did despite all of the efforts of the legacy media to ignore it was to make visible – to people whose two-year battering by government-sponsored promotion of fear and suspicion had made them falter as never before, had made them question their capacities and feel only their incapacities – that we human beings are quite stunningly brave and able and capable of maintaining within our reach the wherewithal to construct our most fundamental conditions and realise our most cherished dreams.

Images from Canada, of tables quaking under the weight of home-cooked food, of people in sub-zero temperatures lining the roadsides and bridges, of tweeted offers of hot showers and warm beds for strangers, of makeshift saunas and pop-up barbeques, of dancing and singing under threat of militarized suppression…these will not fade from our consciousness of what human beings who live freely with one another and in their environment can achieve and achieve with joy.

‘Reconnecting with such gestures, buried under years of normalized life, is,’ so The Invisible Committee wrote, ‘the only practicable means of not sinking down with the world, while we dream of an age that is equal to our passions.’

Sinead Murphy teaches Philosophy at Newcastle University. Her most recent publication is Zombie University: Thinking Under Control (Repeater, 2017).

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Peter Cartwright
Peter Cartwright
Mar 7, 2022 8:00 AM

I live in a small village in the middle of Bulgaria and I would describe it as a “convivial” community and hope it continues, even with the outside pressures to change.

niko
niko
Mar 7, 2022 4:35 AM

Part 2:

Where I try to survive today there’s hardly a stir of resistance to the full implications of what’s rolling out against us, let alone the committed, enduring resistance lasting generations more than ever necessary in confrontation with the intergenerational genocide of today’s final solution. Most of what counts as matters of concern remains, as Murphy notes, the prescribed issues and good-cop/bad-cop con games of left/right politricks. I feel like Don Quixote tilting at windmills over the past couple of years, vainly attempting to engage in a more holistic approach to what’s hidden in plain sight, and steadily descending into hopeless madness.

I know I live in the belly of the beast of Babylon that is Pax/Pox Americana and it can be different elsewhere. But from what little I can make out from within the empire of deceit, not much it seems is ‘out there’ to restore hope – not false hope but real hope rising up from empowered people acting together – and a sense of sanity. But maybe this is just more of my Stockholm syndrome speaking, and those truckers in Canada (or Australia) are morphing into more sustained movements of liberation, or the US convoy has gathered momentum from growing radicalization as well as numbers.

Maybe people won’t be so misdirected from the continuing global war against humanity by the convenient conventional war in Ukraine (not to mention all the other forgotten hot spots on the grand chessboard) as to not recognize their strategic complementarity: from the latest fear factor to hold us in thrall to the gods of war, whatever weapons all their industrial complexes – military, medical, monetary, and more – may vomit forth as means to steer masses of untermenschen into slaughterhouses; to geopolitical theater for further controlled demolition of national economies like sanctions leading to supply chain crises, if not cyberattacks, and crippling inflation and austerity.

Maybe the powers that shouldn’t be as they tread upon sparks of revolt here and there will only ignite the “subterranean fire” (August Spies) waiting to blaze forth from the power of people ready to revolutionize both the forces and relations of (re)production, taking them down to human scale. Maybe…

Oh hell, I’ve been rambling so long I’ve forgotten what direction I was going with any of this rant. I need a good kick in the ass from Sancho Panza. So, I better just shut up and stop to remember this starting point to reorient myself to one firm basis of conviction, rooted in lifelong experience I can’t possibly deny before eventually still going on and struggling to survive and fight for the living another day:

“There’s a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious—makes you so sick at heart—that you can’t take part. You can’t even passively take part. And you’ve got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels, upon the levers, upon all the apparatus, and you’ve got to make it stop. And you’ve got to indicate to the people who run it, to the people who own it that unless you’re free, the machine will be prevented from working at all.” (Mario Savio)

niko
niko
Mar 7, 2022 4:30 AM

Part 1:

I was in New Orleans for Katrina, and its destructive aftermath, until I was forced by economic necessity to leave home and join the permanent diaspora of exiles displaced by its disaster capitalism. Yes, there were communities of care in the chaos. And there were ugly undersides of inhumanity which rose more to the surface in extremity as well. I can’t really romanticize my memory of that time and place as “a paradise built in hell” (Rebecca Solnit), even if it did interrupt the demonic drudgery of the by now old abnormal to open up other ways of being human, at least for a while.

The trouble finally is that it was temporary, nothing more in the end than memory of more lost possibilities, overrun by shock-doctrine reset of human relations even then preparing the plebs for the new abnormal that has overtaken us all today. Like the imposition of martial law under cover of humanitarianism, if not public health, as military and mercenary (Blackwater/Academi) operations laid siege to the city under same old cover story of mismanaged, incompetent, bungling civil authorities, apparently having no organized plan to address crisis conveniently made opportune for other plans, even as outpouring of assistance from around the world was officially blocked. Or like the infiltration of convivial community such as the Common Ground Collective to coopt its “everyday anarchy” (Colin Ward) to the philanthropically colonized nonprofit industrial complex. Nowadays, with self-congratulatory wokeness and virtue signaling of privileged progressives courting tourists of Disneyfied theme parks who will never know the former city’s visceral, working-class roots of joie de vivre or laissez les bons temps rouler, New Orleans takes official pride as a municipal leader of the biosecurity state with draconian population control to rival NYC on the east coast or SF and LA on the west.

From my formative years in the 60s, such practical utopia of decentralized society as that of Illich has guided me. “Small is beautiful” (E.F. Schumacher) and “human scale” (Kirkpatrick Sale) is considered essential for genuinely human lives lived in freedom and dignity, beyond the socially engineered Skinnerian relations of the industrial machine. It is indeed a vision, or memory, if not experience any longer, rooted in the kinship communities, our common indigenous origins, which have characterized human evolution throughout most of its journey, especially prior to the assault on these roots from class-based ‘civilization’ beginning some five to ten thousand years. But I sure feel, or have been made to feel, the dehumanizing, death-driven monoculture of the MegaMachine (Lewis Mumford) has alarmingly accelerated during my lifetime, such that today we are being engineered into a truly dystopian endgame which would annihilate any trace of humanity and our evolution.

If I were to write a treatise on what’s contributed to this universal and ultimate alienation, I’d want to cover the complexity of causes and conditions. Certainly, what Murphy raises above in regard to the proliferating professionalization of human social relations (as through the nonprofit industrial complex), the nullity of the bureaucratic mold and its “specialists without spirit, sensualists without heart” (Max Weber) which increasingly has come to pass for the apex of civilization in its technocratic mode (as Jacques Ellul detailed), is worth including. And in this respect, John McKnight’s The Careless Society: Community and Its Counterfeits, though a dated treatment from a student of Illich, still offers some worthwhile insight, I think, into how this soulless existence has metastasized. It provides some background, for one, as to how such arch-apparatchiks like Klaus Schwab can be lecturing the planet on the Great Reset and fourth industrial revolution.

I’d also include attention to what is often, misleadingly, summed up as the deskilling of human labor, such that the autonomous human agent of work has been swallowed almost completely by automation, enforced dependency and powerlessness before Taylorized scientific management of production and the resources of life, and conquest of the human commons ripe for transhumanist mutation into AI, with any Luddite sense of resistance long forgotten by the biodigital convergence already achieved in the third industrial revolution. Again, another dated text that may still be relevant here is Harry Braverman’s Labor and Monopoly Capital: The Degradation of Work in the Twentieth Century.

And to be sure, I’d want to give some attention to a general loss of class consciousness and community, from post-WWII cultivation of consumer capitalism and anti-communism and bloody betrayals of actually existing socialism to manufactured identitarian politics and lifestyles and ersatz rebellion against ‘the system’ as that’s largely cast for the “bewildered herd” (Walter Lippmann) by “captains of consciousness” (Stuart Ewen) behind the scenes and screens of the matrix. People without vision perish, as biblical proverb has it, and realization of how capitalism is, as Marx prophesied, the most revolutionary force of class war ever unleashed upon humanity, with technology as weapons under control of the ruling class, has dangerously disappeared.

But what’s most missing for me from the hellscape that’s been laid for us are the practices, in conjunction with theory, that would give some feet to any of these free-floating reflections. Though I’m familiar with more contemporary critiques than those casually referred to above, I’ve intentionally kept to the dated references because it does seem by chronological comparison there’s been significant decline of popular critical literacy since their time, in no small part due to more totalized electronic media programming, capable of comprehending the greater need than ever of deconstructing the monstrous machinery coming at us, and recovering such spirit of revolt as I recall with 1968’s revival of the Paris Commune, for example (Beneath the bricks, the beach, etc.). Primacy of practice, however, leads me to understand this development to be but the effect of the far more dangerous disappearance, above all in ‘advanced’ industrial societies, of human-scaled, face-to-face communities and lived traditions or habits of living still connected with values and virtues carrying on embodied experience of conviviality, other ways of being human with “all our relations,” as the Lakota Sioux say, because the nature and meaning of existence is rooted in relationship.

“The struggle of man against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting.” (Milan Kundera) But what is to be any longer remembered when our atomized, disconnected bodies and psyches carry virtually no trace materialism of humanity before the disaster civilization has become, especially in the digital (c)age? As Walter Benjamin and others variously have observed, people rarely if ever struggle against any odds for any future promise apart from some realization already in their bones of the “beloved community” (Martin Luther King), experience of which makes living worthwhile, and which ancestors very well may have died defending. It seems cultural wastelands and vacuums waiting to be filled by commodity fetishism, spectacle, and techno-idolatry characterize our present predicament, in which everything that might (re)define the human journey apart from the institutional powers destroying conviviality are at most temporary epiphenomena, last gasps of a species in danger of extinction.

The Coming Revolution
The Coming Revolution
Mar 6, 2022 10:39 PM

“Reconnecting with such gestures [of tender humanity, of spontaneous, unpredictable, immanent manifestation of the spark of life that we are], buried under years of normalized life, is the only practicable means of not sinking down with the world, while we dream of an age that is equal to our passions.” – The Invisible Committee

And circumstances will take care of providing us with ample opportunities to do just that.

Jeffrey Strahl
Jeffrey Strahl
Mar 6, 2022 10:37 PM

Good to see Sinead back.

wardropper
wardropper
Mar 6, 2022 9:23 PM

Just keep in mind one thing, and you’ll be okay:

There is no depth to which ‘the authorities’ will not sink to achieve their ends.
They’ve reached the bottom of the barrel, and they’re still digging downwards…
Be ready for anything – your granny being hit by a bus, your kids abducted, your mortgage cancelled, your air, food and water poisoned, and your daily attendance at 2-minute hate meetings mandatory.

The script was written long ago.
Now all “The Narrative” requires is that we slot comfortably into the roles set out for us by our drama coaches.

That’s the scenario.

And the answer is still, no.

wardropper
wardropper
Mar 6, 2022 9:14 PM

Sorry if I’m being dense here, but I missed something…

What is this “Invisible Committee” ?

NixonScraypes
NixonScraypes
Mar 6, 2022 11:53 PM
Reply to  wardropper

I don’t know about the committee, but I was introduced to the idea of the invisible community when I was about nineteen. Not having any money, I was walking to see a friend who lived about eight miles away when I was overtaken by a fellow going the same way. He was obviously an outsider, a large man with with an unusual rolling gait, I was intrigued, increased my pace and engaged him in conversation. He’d come about forty miles and was heading to a nearby port to rejoin his community on the continent somewhere. He’d been to Kent to pass a message and was returning ,who knows how much further, on foot. I was very much at odds with society and hoped to get some insight into surviving life in that situation from someone who was obviously used to it. It was so long ago and I don’t remember the details but he was not opposed to society at all, as I vehemently was. He was paralell to it, interacting with with those who were part of the invisible community. That chance meeting altered my attitude profoundly, allowing me to go my own way without the need to be in opposition to imaginary distinctions. You just reminded me of it.

Lorie
Lorie
Mar 6, 2022 6:54 PM

Thank you for this. We had a similar experience during Hurricane Sandy–I lived in one of the worst hit areas of staten Island, and the storm surge actually covered the one story houses. My street was working class, not poor, with mostly sanitation workers & firemen, and first gen immigrants (Russian mostly).

Before the water went down the men were out in rubber boats pulling people and pets off the roofs and taking them to shelter. When teh water went down the city mostly ignored us for about a week, during which time we came together, helping each other with cleanup and moral support. I have never in my life slept better, even in my ice cold house, because of the hard work and the sense of working together.

When the city (under BLOOMBERG, ugh), finally did deign to look our way, wet-suited cops showed up threatening us with “biohazards” and saying the city was going to bulldoze the street (these houses were, for those who owned them, their only assets), and later I witnessed them arresting some guys who had come by looking for water damaged appliances people were throwing out! (right after I actually hauled out an old TV and handed it to them…)

So…yeah. short-lived convivality in contrast with the heavy handed “safety” of the city.

The Canadian Truckers gave me that feeling again, even just vicariously. So it is possible. Thanks for this article.

dr death
dr death
Mar 6, 2022 6:37 PM

for cone head klaus and the boys, there will be no ‘living’ outside their ‘system’, no ‘coming together’ of alternatives… he alludes to ‘those who choose not to participate’ in the science fiction novels dressed up as policy he had ghostwritten for him….but in reality these elitist imbeciles intend to kill all dissent…

tyrants don’t offer their slaves choices…

so I’m afraid it’s a good old fashioned fight… think ‘john connor’ in those terminator movies…

Paul Vonharnish
Paul Vonharnish
Mar 6, 2022 3:44 PM

Excellent article. A bit tooooo looooong for any one premise to stick, yet well written. This person rather boils the entire theme down to one question. >

“Can you remember who you were before the world told you who you could be?”

– Danielle LaPorte –
(Born May 25, 1969)

The Coming Revolution
The Coming Revolution
Mar 6, 2022 4:05 PM

+1

That quote reminds me of something I wrote here some months back: “Ignorance and slavery go hand in hand: it is because one doesn’t know who one is, and hence what place one is destined by right to occupy on this earth, that one allows others to define it for one.”🙂

Kung Fu Tzu
Kung Fu Tzu
Mar 6, 2022 1:38 PM

The works of Ivan Illich have guided my life for the last 50 years. Two of his other books which will reveal the real needs of humanity are Medical Nemesis and Deschooling Society

GR-Watch
GR-Watch
Mar 6, 2022 9:54 AM

“Body of Shane Warne taken to mainland Thailand for autopsy”

how much work and how much money the mullahs in canberra would be spending to MAKE SURE THE AUTOPSY RESULTS FIT THE GREAT NARRATIVE???!!

even in the absence of any hint of conspiracy, governments like in australia worry mostly about, and want to control, every detail of the national discourse.

Richard Hennerley
Richard Hennerley
Mar 6, 2022 7:54 AM

Indeed…it was NEVER about a virus, it was always about remodeling the economy to the liking of our ruling psychotic, satanic elite, destroying ‘democracy’ (such as it was), turning us all into serfs and killing off as many ‘useless eaters’ as possible. We are ruled by psychopaths.

THE NEW CROWN VIRUS (A PSYCHOPATH’S DELIGHT)

Penelope
Penelope
Mar 6, 2022 6:49 AM

On Fox News: I forget the name of the puppet, but he says our cyber security is like kindergarten; “they” (Russians or Chinese) could take down the power grid for weeks or months.

Rus/Ukie War and especially its sanctions will further degrade the global economy. Energy is our most basic commodity; increasing its scarcity and cost will be an even greater expense than the lockdown. If TPTB write the script to take the grid down for any substantial period, many people will die.


The vaxx passport issue has been replaced entirely by the digital ID. Putin supports it. He’s playing the Good Guy, seemingly converted to the arch-villain only by the Western controlled media. But beneath that Good Guy veil he’s just another of Klaus’s boys helping the Great Reset.

Well, that’s what they think; I think they’ve got another think coming.

Sofia
Sofia
Mar 6, 2022 4:35 AM

Great article! The future is a battle between libidinal, creative, complex and imperfect human beings and the algorithm. I’m glad to see a critique here of the nuclear family when everyone seems to be fetishising it.

Placental_Mammal
Placental_Mammal
Mar 6, 2022 5:52 AM
Reply to  Sofia

Feminism is a bankster offensive and couldn’t possibly be good for mankind or the environment.

El Zafio
El Zafio
Mar 6, 2022 9:10 AM

Ivan Illich in Gender wrote about that as well.

steadydirt
steadydirt
Mar 7, 2022 2:54 PM

ages ago a man could house and raise a family with his income.
did not feminism conveniently help the rich put the wife to also finding an income while the man’s income was devalued? so two were required work to live.

Lorie
Lorie
Mar 6, 2022 6:57 PM
Reply to  Sofia

+ yes good point re: nuclear family

NixonScraypes
NixonScraypes
Mar 7, 2022 12:00 AM
Reply to  Sofia

Got a better way of of creating new life? Oh yes it can be done now in a laboratory. Hope you like it.

Researcher
Researcher
Mar 7, 2022 1:07 AM
Reply to  NixonScraypes

Not for the vaxxed. Lol

These anti-family people are narcissistic sociopaths. They probably support ALL the divide and conquer narratives.

Sofia
Sofia
Mar 7, 2022 4:50 AM
Reply to  Researcher

Wth you guys the critique above is regarding a particular form of the family, he counterposes the wider kinship group instead which provides more support which would have included extended family, friends and neighbours. The reality is that capitalism is destroying even the nuclear family now.

The idea that it would be preferable to bring up the next generation, take care of the elderly and generally convivive within a wider kinship group is not narcissistic or wanting to destroy family. Why do you think the title refers to Canadian conviviality – in the brief moment the truckers were in Ottawa they created such a loving support network that could be seen as an example of a wider kinship group and anyone who has been involved in such a thing knows what a great feeling that is and how playful and supportive such a thing can be It is not to deny the importance of personal intimate relationships. There is so much to write about here but please try and engage in the ideas presented and not just twist to insult others.

Johnny
Johnny
Mar 6, 2022 4:33 AM
Big al
Big al
Mar 6, 2022 4:29 AM

I think it was Grok who said to Rok, way back, “screw you Rok, I’m going to be free, you aren’t the boss of me” (paraphrased). And ever since then, there have been humans who seem to have an innate sense that life is about freedom, and freedom is about life. These people (we) are always going to be with us. So, you see, “they” can never win because freedom is innate. I’m putting that out there because I had to look up conviviality. I’ve got Canadian blood, my dad was born in Saskatchewan. But he left us when I was 3, never saw him again. Doesn’t seem very convivial to me, but you know how generalized reputations are, eh?

clyde
clyde
Mar 6, 2022 8:04 PM
Reply to  Big al

Whatever one thinks of the French, they understood that the pillars of civilization are freedom, equality and brotherhood. Freedom is what global capitalists love. Being unfettered to accumulate power. The current trend to reform people’s thoughts is the identitarianism which focuses solely on “equality” while completely disregarding freedom and brotherhood, or “conviviality”.

les online
les online
Mar 6, 2022 4:27 AM

There’s Big Pharma, and there’s Big Farmer. Is there a difference ?
In the USA the War Against Health continues. On another front, The Coalition of The BIG’s War to Control You has launched more attempts to cripple the availability of vitamin and mineral supplements made necessary to maintain health due to the low nutritional content of foods…

1 of Grandma’s Oranges = 8 Present Day Oranges’
‘It is our poor diet and food grown in nutrient depleted soil, in addition to chemical toxins and pollutants, that has helped create an epidemic of chronic disease’. (ANH).(The Alliance for Natural Health rejects hydroponically grown foods being labeled ‘organic’, and rightly so !)…

https://anh-usa.org/what-do-diabetes-heart-disease-and-cancer-have-in-common/

steadydirt
steadydirt
Mar 7, 2022 3:01 PM
Reply to  les online

so true.

GR-Watch
GR-Watch
Mar 6, 2022 4:05 AM

“alternative sources of authority to that of the state – the family, the firm, the church, the individual”

sorry, the church is NOT an alternative source of authority!!!

– the CHURCH is the Original Ubiquitous Control System

– the CHURCH is the Original Ubiquitous Surveillance System

.. where control is strictly enforced from top to bottom,

.. where pleasure is reserved for the church leaders but is a (mortal) sin for the plebs

.. and where information and wealth flows STRICTLY from the bottom to top.

the Church today and for centuries has nothing to do with Jesus teachings which is used for public relations purposes. The Church’s mission is to keep the poor and the weak in-check/under control. yes there are economic rewards for those who comply and do a good job in complying and assisting in spreading the word/Narrative.

the Church is preying on refugees, prisoners, international workers and students and hyperactivity recruiting them to become agents for The Government and to spread “The Great Narrative”.

The priest who supported those who needed help in South America was thrown out from a flying helicopter.

Edwige
Edwige
Mar 6, 2022 9:18 AM
Reply to  GR-Watch

The Church has been infiltrated for centuries, possibly from the very beginning. Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel painting is a Gnostic allegory – did nobody notice?

Just as seriously, what is “the firm” doing in there? Corporations are as much part of the problem as the state (which is where libertarians get it wrong).

BTW Ilich was a Jesuit – not everything he said was wrong but be extremely wary about where his solutions lead.

GR-Watch
GR-Watch
Mar 6, 2022 10:06 AM
Reply to  Edwige

indeed,

‘what is “the firm” doing in there?’

probably better replaced by skilled individuals or artisans.

rememberingmonkey
rememberingmonkey
Mar 6, 2022 5:23 PM
Reply to  GR-Watch

The true Church is the Bride of Christ, who love and keep his ways. He is the final authority.

Kalen
Kalen
Mar 6, 2022 1:06 AM

Strange world indeed. Now MoA and NC laments that they can no longer police their blogs, as it is not as easy as in the case of total censorship of Covid comments.

Yves Smith of Naked Capitalism states:

Lambert and I both find this is the worst informational environment either of us have faced, orders of magnitude worse than the war in Iraq, …

and:

Dear patient readers,

Lambert and I, and many readers, agree that Ukraine has prompted the worst informational environment ever. We hope readers will collaborate in mitigating the fog of war – both real fog and stage fog – in comments. None of us need more cheerleading and link-free repetition of memes; there are platforms for that.

B continued:

I ask readers and commentators here to live by the same standard. There are too many comments now for me to read and police. Please notify me via email if there are certain trolls or offenders who deserve to be excluded from this site.

MoA says See something Say something so we can kill freedom of speech together.

soon their blogs will be censorship list and gagged.

winegum
winegum
Mar 6, 2022 12:59 AM

Is Klaus Schwab the Most Dangerous Man in the World?

I’ve been saying for years, liberals are the greatest threat to all life on this planet.

Placental_Mammal
Placental_Mammal
Mar 6, 2022 6:09 AM
Reply to  winegum

Plus 100. But Anal Schwab is both a puppet and a puppeteer.

hotrod31
hotrod31
Mar 6, 2022 12:10 PM
Reply to  winegum

I couldn’t agree more with your summation of Libtards. However, I suspect that you might be giving to much credit to Herr Schwab … to an observer, he is just another pawn-front being used by his controllers. Who controls him? I guess one would need to follow the money to establish that.

The Coming Revolution
The Coming Revolution
Mar 6, 2022 4:30 PM
Reply to  hotrod31

Yes, but not “who?” but “what?” It’s Capital itself that exercises power.
comment image

mgeo
mgeo
Mar 7, 2022 6:47 AM

Capitalism utilises subversion (of government, legislature and the courts) and propaganda. Almost always, it has produced rigged competition, kleptocracy of common resources, worsening work, rising poverty, debt slavery, worsening safety, falling sustainability, totalitarianism, and imperialism (economic, subversive and military).

The Coming Revolution
The Coming Revolution
Mar 7, 2022 2:26 PM
Reply to  mgeo

+1

Yes. These institutions, the monetary and wage systems are humanity’s enemies. Bring them down and it doesn’t matter if one’s name is Schwab, Soros, Carstens, or Carney.

Blind Gill
Blind Gill
Mar 6, 2022 11:31 PM
Reply to  hotrod31

I always feel we overlook the royal elites. The European royal families are all related and have been in power for over a millenia.

steadydirt
steadydirt
Mar 7, 2022 3:06 PM
Reply to  hotrod31

the bank of international settlements wishes to be the world owner

Penelope
Penelope
Mar 6, 2022 12:46 AM

Uh-Oh. Looks like they are getting “the blame” out ahead of a planned cyber attack

“Although the United States is bracing for retaliatory Russian cyberattacks, experts in the field say the Kremlin is likely still weighing whether destructive action in cyberspace is worth the blowback. 

“Russia has shown cyber restraint, at least for the moment, even as the West imposes sanctions that have quickly strangled its economy and targeted government leaders and oligarchs. 

“The question is not ‘can Russia carry out cyberattacks against Europe or the United States,’ ” said Melissa Griffith, a senior program associate with the science and technology innovation program at The Wilson Center.
https://thehill.com/policy/cybersecurity/596782-russia-weighs-risks-of-launching-cyberattacks-against-the-west

AND

“Cyber outage occurred before Russian action in Unkraine
Paris: Thousands of internet users across Europe have been thrown offline after what sources said Friday was a likely cyberattack at the beginning of Russia’s offensive in Ukraine.

“According to Orange, nearly 9,000 subscribers of a satellite internet service provided by its subsidiary Nordnet in France are without internet following a “cyber event” on February
24.

“around one-third of bigblu’s 40,000 subscribers in Europe, in Germany, France, Hungary, Greece, Italy and Poland, were affected by the outage on Viasat”.  

https://www.ndtv.com/world-news/thousands-without-internet-after-europes-massive-cyberattack-report-2804722

citizen
citizen
Mar 6, 2022 8:12 AM
Reply to  Penelope

it always makes me wonder if any country is sophisticated enough to closedown a countries internet and or powergrid completely, they keep threatening but can it be actually done? is this diversion so countries shut the net down from the inside and blame it on someone else.

Edwige
Edwige
Mar 6, 2022 9:22 AM
Reply to  citizen

A blanket cyber shutdown would expose one of the big flaws in CBDCs – plus normies might get their faces out of Facebook for a while which is definitely not wanted.

If it happens, it’s much more likely to be focussed on crucial chokepoints in supply chains (and monopolisation means there are plenty of those).

wardropper
wardropper
Mar 6, 2022 9:31 PM
Reply to  citizen

Well it’s not as if power outages are unknown in Western society…
A bad snow storm can do it, so, in come the bad snow storm simulations…

steadydirt
steadydirt
Mar 7, 2022 3:09 PM
Reply to  Penelope

it is in the reset script

les online
les online
Mar 6, 2022 12:20 AM

During the ‘covid pandemic’ the various stakeholders have done everything possible to prevent access to cheap remedies. They are not interested in Health but in the Management of Disease.
During the ‘covid pandemic’ the drug and vax-makers friend, the USA Food & Drug Administration (FDA), continued it’s war against vitamin and food supplements.
The slowly increasing popularity of treatment alternatives to established medicine is a threat, a threat that health/vax passports (by whatever name) are destined to completely remove…

El Zafio
El Zafio
Mar 6, 2022 9:12 AM
Reply to  les online

Remedy for what, exactly?

Edwige
Edwige
Mar 6, 2022 9:35 AM
Reply to  les online

Notice it’s treatments, not cures. As Goldman Sachs tells doctors, are you sure curing your patients is a viable business model?

BTW it was disappointing to see the article still pushing the idea of immunity. Claims of “natural immunity” may be more benign than vaccine-based immunity but they feed into it by offering the false promise that immunity exists. The body has a defense system, not an immune system. It also has a toxic load from the harm inflicted on it in the past. Apparent “immunity” is simply the low odds of getting a disease combined with a strong defense system and low toxicity. One Victorian advocate of immunity was still claiming immunity existed as his daughter got scarlet fever for the third time and eventually died from it – such is the power of that particular paradigm. It also reinforces the idea that diseases exist as discreet conditions with an external pathogen cause rather than diseased conditions caused by particular locations, types and levels of toxicity in the body.

les online
les online
Mar 6, 2022 10:20 AM
Reply to  Edwige

The dominant medical / disease paradigm is powerful. Nearly every article i find informative has it as its ideological architecture. If i post links to such articles it’s because i’m ever expecting someone will expose how the dominant paradigm distorts, and thus serves interests other than our own..
Keep up The Good Work.
100 +

Penelope
Penelope
Mar 6, 2022 12:14 AM

MORE SCRAPS From Russian Sites:
Russian ambassador to Mexico Víktor Koronelli says the demonstrations in front of its embassy in Mexico are paid for by the Ukie embassy.
Rusia accuses the ukie nationalists of preventing civilians from using the safe eviction corridors provided for them.

Mexico is Russia’s 2d largest trading partner in Latin America. Mexican leader Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has said that the country would not join the anti-Russian sanctions

New Putin decree: Within 2 days govt must list countries committing “unfriendly actions” towards Russia. {I take this to mean economic/financial actions]  

Decree also states that Russian organizations will be able to pay debts to creditors from unfriendly countries in rubles or in a “different manner”, which is determined by the Central Bank and the Ministry of Finance of the Russian Federation. 

Russia is maintaining a list of traitors to the Motherland– people who oppose the action in Ulraine. It appears on the website of the Committee for the Protection of the National Interests of the Russian Federation.

Earlier, the official representative of the Russian Foreign Ministry, Maria Zakharova , said that NATO intelligence services are responsible for anti-Russian fakes about Russia’s special military operation in Ukraine. According to her, the confrontation “is guided and orchestrated from Brussels.”
—-
Re Nuclear War:
“Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov assessed the possible scope of a third world war, noting that it would go nuclear and cause terrible destruction if it happened. It is reported by Al Jazeera TV channel .

“World War III will be a destructive, nuclear war,” Lavrov said.

“In addition, the minister cited the statement of US President Joe Biden that an alternative to tough sanctions against Russia could be a third world war. [I think he ptobably said vice-versa]

“Earlier, Lavrov said that the presence of American nuclear weapons on the territory of European countries is unacceptable. He stressed that Russia is calling on the United States to return him home. Also, according to the minister, the United States, together with non-nuclear NATO countries, are working out a scenario for the use of nuclear weapons against Russia as part of joint missions.”

Подробнее: https://www.m24.ru/news/politika/02032022/436326?utm_source=CopyBuf

Has Zelensky lost control of foreign mercenaries?

The official representative of the Russian Ministry of Defense, Igor Konashenkov, did not rule out that Ukrainian President Vladimir Zelensky had lost control over Ukrainian sabotage and reconnaissance groups (DRGs) with the participation of foreign mercenaries.

Konashenkov made such a statement, commenting on the provocation in the area of ​​the Zaporozhye nuclear power plant.

“All this testifies to the criminal intent of the Kiev regime or the complete loss of control by Zelensky over the actions of Ukrainian sabotage groups with the participation of foreign mercenaries,” he said.

Earlier , the Russian Ministry of Defense announced a monstrous provocation by the Kiev regime at the Zaporozhye nuclear power plant.

[Earlier Syrian intell had reported Turkey was selecting Arab mercenaries to fight & for sabotage]

https://russian.rt.com/ussr/news/971243-minoborony-zelenskii-drg?utm_source=smi2

Berlin Beerman
Berlin Beerman
Mar 6, 2022 1:13 PM
Reply to  Penelope

Both sides have paid of hire options and could deploy to fight a dirty war on a parallel front. That does nothing but delay the outcome and many in the EU are starting to get tired of it all.

Dragging this out will only show the West’s contempt. Their news media has already run out of fake stories.

If the Americans are that stupid to do so and Zelensky’s stalling has been to aid in that effect then I suspect he will not be retiring in Florida at all.

mgeo
mgeo
Mar 6, 2022 4:28 PM
Reply to  Penelope

The critical issue is not how Russia will pay for imports but how others will pay for its exports – in the currency it specifies.

Johnny
Johnny
Mar 6, 2022 12:12 AM

‘Mutual Aid’ is a more appropriate description of what’s happening Sinead.
It’s occurs naturally in Nature.
Mutual Aid is one of the driving energies of evolution. Without it, we would still be in the swamps, or swinging from the trees at best.
Kropotkin (one of those ‘nasty’ Russians) observed this over a hundred years ago.
Mutual Aid is a beacon in dark times.

Placental_Mammal
Placental_Mammal
Mar 6, 2022 5:46 AM
Reply to  Johnny

Pre agricultural societies had great achievements and were sustainable. Convid suggests that the banksters have brough us to the brink of extinction and are using lethal injections to terminate us.

mgeo
mgeo
Mar 6, 2022 4:33 PM

The major changes included
:- urbanisation: alienation from the commons
:- money overtaking reputation in importance.

Edwige
Edwige
Mar 6, 2022 9:41 AM
Reply to  Johnny

Yes, mutual aid is lovely – but the reality is that kinship ties are necessary to underpin it. A village community is usually several extended kinship groups come together.

The MSM pushed ‘Friends’. Why did they do that? They know friendship groups aren’t as powerful as families. Even in ‘Friends’ there is a family bond to make the group credible (surprise, surprise that it’s a Jewish one – like multiculturalism, it might be noticed that Jewish-owned media psuhes certain ideas without practising it themselves).

Most people who’ve had experience with terminal illness like I have recently know that when it comes down to the life-and-death questions it’s family that do the heavy lifting.

Lorie
Lorie
Mar 6, 2022 8:10 PM
Reply to  Johnny

+1

winegum
winegum
Mar 6, 2022 12:09 AM

Centres of Formal education are just indoctrination centres for the ruling class to sew their ideological agenda, & maintain control over the masses.

Don’t waste time talking about WEF & Schwab, Ask whose pulling Schwab’s strings.

El Zafio
El Zafio
Mar 6, 2022 9:14 AM
Reply to  winegum

Spot on. In Sweden, as of recently, by law, people are no longer allowed to homeschool.

wardropper
wardropper
Mar 6, 2022 9:37 PM
Reply to  El Zafio

Fortunately, “by law” no longer means anything.
The laws have been manipulated so that they no longer serve the interests of the people, so the people are perfectly entitled to ignore the unjust ones.

Since most people today have no ‘faith’, it naturally follows that the Ten Commandments no longer have any clout.
People will simply do whatever they feel like doing, and “The Law” will break down.

That’s where The Swab moves in…

steadydirt
steadydirt
Mar 7, 2022 3:15 PM
Reply to  El Zafio

wow.

Edwige
Edwige
Mar 6, 2022 9:43 AM
Reply to  winegum

So who do you think that is?

les online
les online
Mar 5, 2022 11:59 PM

Convivial community = children playing.

The Nuclear Family, breeding grounds for all manner of emotional pathologies.

Someone remembers Ivan Illich’s ideas = someone who has resisted the enticements of Historical Amnesia.

Mary
Mary
Mar 5, 2022 11:37 PM

I think the entire trucker convoy was a psyop as controlled opposition just like 6 January

Placental_Mammal
Placental_Mammal
Mar 6, 2022 5:50 AM
Reply to  Mary

They may have walked into a bankster trap. That doesn’t mean they aren’t heroes. Would you rather they did nothing ?

Lorie
Lorie
Mar 6, 2022 8:11 PM

+1

steadydirt
steadydirt
Mar 7, 2022 3:18 PM

They knowingly walked into a bankster trap. keep watching.

The Coming Revolution
The Coming Revolution
Mar 6, 2022 3:40 PM
Reply to  Mary

Following that logic, every opposition movement is a controlled opposition because, at this point in history, Capital’s capacity to seduce, bribe, repress is still high and the opposition (which is really all of us), still not sure about what is at stake here, what it is up against, is groping its way in the dark and the first attempts may very likely get stuck on the way. That doesn’t mean that it was a waste of time nor that the opposition in question is somehow our enemy. Every protest movement will pile up on top of the previous one, and Capital will try and absorb it and that will feed back into our consciousness until we become conscious that the whole system has to go and with that consciousness will coincide both the exhaustion of Capital’s capacity for seduction and the clarity of what it means in practice to overcome it.

For instance, we might not have had the convoys hadn’t we have the protests in Europe; things pile up on top of each other and the current stage is as necessary to the next one as the previous one was to the current one.

mgeo
mgeo
Mar 6, 2022 4:49 PM

+1

Lorie
Lorie
Mar 6, 2022 8:11 PM

+1

Mary
Mary
Mar 5, 2022 11:34 PM

It was a psyop. Another form of controlled opposition

Penelope
Penelope
Mar 6, 2022 10:50 PM
Reply to  Mary

Dogmatic, Mary.

Paul Prichard
Paul Prichard
Mar 5, 2022 10:57 PM

People shouldn’t be mislabelling anti-authoritarians as anti-vaxxers.
Your alternative update on #COVID19 for 2022-03-04. MFP/NPC: 2020 covid, 2022 Ukraine. Jabbed Shane passes, Novak doesn’t. 9 pages of adverse events (blog, gab, tweet).

Penelope
Penelope
Mar 5, 2022 10:41 PM

Preplanned CYBER ATTACK Coming I betcha.
Blamed on Russia of course
AND worsening supply chain blamed on it.
The remedy? A one-world govt!
Do your prepping guys.

US vets fighting on Ukie side– US-paid Mercenaries, right?
Arab mercenaries are already there– saboteurs

Biden offers work permits & temporary residence to 75k Ukies.
This means welfare payments for most probably; and
permanent residence, since US doesn’t keep track of even its illegals.
How much you wanna bet they’re all young men to help w
inner city chaos?

Penelope
Penelope
Mar 5, 2022 10:52 PM
Reply to  Penelope

PS Water supply is shortly affected by a power outage. Be prepared; anything can happen now.

DC Convoy is 70 miles long now.