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Ancient Apocalypse & Graham Hancock’s ‘Dangerous Ideas’ Why has the popular Netflix documentary ignited the ire of the media?

JR Leach

It never ceases to amaze me what seemingly innocuous ideas the establishment media find ‘dangerous’ or ‘controversial’.

Netflix recently released an eight-part documentary series titled Ancient Apocalypse, where Graham Hancock (who has a been a household name for “alternative archeology” since the release of his book ‘Fingerprints of the Gods’ in 1995), introduces us to his central theory that human civilisation is considerably older than current archeological orthodoxy believes, but that most evidence for this was wiped out by a colossal natural disaster around 12,000 years ago.

He supports this theory with physical evidence for such a natural disaster, curious geological anomalies and seemingly ancient megalithic structures.

He points out that the mainstream view of pre-history insists civilisation did not and had never existed before the year 4000BC, but that recent discoveries such as the Temple at Gobekli Tepe, which dates back to 9600BC call that mainstream view into question.

He also collates mythic stories and old legends from over around the world that all reference some massive, global catastrophe. (Floods, earthquakes, giant snakes in the sky, strange visitors from across the sea etc.) And then emphasises their many eerie similarities.

Through the collation of this research, Hancock then asks some questions of the mainstream view of our ancient history and posits a theory of his own – that ‘we are a species with amnesia’, who have forgotten our own past.

These are not new ideas, solely from Hancock’s imagination. Immanuel Velikovsy said something very similar half a century ago, in fact his last book, published posthumously, was titled “Mankind in Amnesia”, and explored the psychological impact of us, as a species, repressing the memories and forgetting the stories that echo from a distant, traumatised past.

These questions might sound intriguing to you, or you may be indifferent to them, or you may even vehemently disagree with them, but I bet you didn’t know they were racist, did you?

That’s right. Racist. Don’t believe me, you conspiracy theorist? Just ask the Guardian.

Yes, the Graun has spoiled us with not just one hit-piece, but two! All in the space of one week.

Robin McKie writes his from an archaeological standpoint, while Stuart Heritage speaks as an entertainment critic. However, one is very much like the other. They both agree the Netflix series is wholly unacceptable. All of it. These are ‘dangerous ideas’ that shouldn’t be ‘allowed’.

McKie alleges Hancock’s claims reinforce ‘white supremacist ideas’, because questioning the age of human civilisation

…strip[s] indigenous people of their rich heritage and instead gives credit to aliens or white people”

McKie further explains:

Then there were the Nazis. Many swore by the idea that a white Nordic superior race – people of “the purest blood” – had come from Atlantis. As a result, Himmler set up an SS unit, the Ahnenerbe – or Bureau of Ancestral Heritage – in 1935 to find out where people from Atlantis had ended up after the deluge had destroyed their homeland.”

There we have it, you see! Don’t even bother linking to any sources, Robin (which he doesn’t). I hear you, loud and clear. The idea of Atlantis is inherently racist, because the Nazis believed in it.

The fact Hancock never mentions race, or white people (or aliens) in the series, nor (to the best of my knowledge) in any of his books, makes no difference to this.

So, what are you going to do now? Keep researching the Atlantis myth?

Like a Nazi would?

Of course, going by this logic, we should really do away with Christianity as well. God in general, in fact.  Perhaps we should cancel Volkswagen and Wagner too. Nazis also brushed their teeth and wore shoes, I believe, neither of which shall I be taking part in from this day onwards, just to be sure.

So, there we have it – Ancient Apocalypse is racist, even though it never mentions race.

The remainder of their twin critiques are no better argued or supported by reality. Here is a typical example of the intellectual level they work on:

For a story that was first told 2,300 years ago, the myth of Atlantis has demonstrated a remarkable persistence over the millennia. Originally outlined by Plato, the tale of the rise of a great, ancient civilisation followed by its cataclysmic destruction has since generated myriad interpretations.”

It was this opening paragraph alone that prompted my response. As it is so uniquely meaningless.

What does he mean by ‘For a story 2,300 years old it has demonstrated remarkable persistence’? As opposed to what? All those other stories that we don’t know about? How is that measurable, exactly?

Besides, we have a plethora of stories and mythologies dating back two and half thousand years, and even much further into the past than that. Including all the Greco-Roman myths, plays by Sophocles and Aesop’s Fables. We have detailed legends and lore passed down from Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia. The Old Testament fits the bill as well.

And of course, Homer’s Iliad, which describes the fabled Trojan War.

Let us remember that the City of Troy was also believed to have been just a myth until we discovered that it wasn’t. And I’m sure before 1870, when it was first discovered, that there was no shortage of academics decrying the search for Troy as a heretical waste of time.

What is the essential attraction of the tale? For answers we only have to look at the works of Tolkien, CS Lewis, HP Lovecraft, Conan Doyle, Brecht and a host of science fiction writers who have all found the myth an irresistible inspiration.”

Simplicity itself! The reason the Atlantis myth is so popular is because it’s so popular!

Robin then asserts as fact that Plato intended the tale of Atlantis to be little more than an allegory.  There is no way of knowing that, of course, he merely asserts it and then goes into a Gish Gallop.

“As to the likely site of the original Atlantis, the serious money goes on the destruction of the Greek island of Santorini and its impact on Crete and puts the blame on volcanic eruptions – not errant comets, as Hancock argues”

Whoa there, Robin. Firstly, Graham Hancock never ‘argues’ that the Greek island of Santorini was struck by an errant comet. That is misleading. He argues that a comet struck somewhere in North America and rising sea levels may have obliterated an island civilisation (that Plato calls Atlantis) in the Atlantic Ocean. It’s only you, Robin, who is conflating this Atlantis myth with Santorini.

[NB – Robin also fails to mention the physical evidence for just such an impact at the beginning of the Younger Dryas.]

Secondly, should we not give credit where credit is due, and assume that Plato (and Solon, from whom Plato got the story, and the Dynastic Egyptians, from whom Solon got the story), most likely knew the difference between ‘inside the Mediterranean’ and ‘outside the Mediterranean’?

If they place Atlantis beyond the Pillars of Hercules, should we not at least consider it possible that this is indeed where “the original Atlantis” was? (I invite readers to listen to Plato’s accounting yourselves and see what you make of it, here is an unabridged and well-produced reading.)

The history of Santorini’s volcanic eruption was probably, by contrast, relatively well known. Santorini didn’t actually sink, after all, as Atlantis is said to have done. It’s still there. The Ancient Greeks called it ‘Thera’ and they were perfectly well aware of its existence. It shares no cultural, historical or technological similarities to Plato’s description of Atlantis at all, short of ‘being an island’.

But none of that bothers McKie who at this point, and without ceremony, just sort of stops writing. Job Done. Atlantis debunked. What’s for lunch?

Moving on to Stuart Heritage’s piece, which is thankfully briefer but in no way less smug. In his subheading he boldly asks:

“Why has this been allowed?” 

Allowed?

I’m not sure which authority he’s calling on here. Netflix execs? Local, national or perhaps global government? Or maybe it’s rhetorical, and he’s beseeching the Lord God himself how such evil could come into the world.

Beyond this, Stuart seems even less interested in debunking or debating these ‘dangerous ideas’ than McKie was, and far more focused on analysing and ridiculing its (presumed) target audience.

Fortunately, Stuart, with his view unbiased and his mind wide open, has discerned exactly who that is in the first five minutes – because he saw (or thinks he saw) Joe Rogan and Jordan Peterson flash up in the pre-show reel.

Joe Rogan appears in one quick interview, which is used in the first episode and the last.

Jordan Peterson does not appear in this documentary at all.

And I’m really not sure why Stuart thought he did. Perhaps he just didn’t watch closely enough to realise this before rushing his five-hundred words off to be published in one of the largest news outlets in the world.

More notably when Heritage later amended the change, he just removed the ‘Jordan Peterson’ reference and neither he nor the editors or sub-eds even bothered to correct the syntax:

“Fortunately, you don’t have to watch for long to find out. In quick succession, during the pre-show sizzle reel, we are treated to a clip of the show’s host Graham Hancock being interviewed by Joe Rogan.”

The laziness is staggering.

Just ‘a different person’. It’s not important who anymore. He’s not on the Guardian’s ‘naughty list.’

Equally strangely, both McKie and Heritage seem to think ‘Ancient Apocalypse’ makes claims of ‘super intelligent beings’ and ‘aliens’, when it simply does not.

Hancock’s argument – whether you accept it or not –   is that human beings were more advanced than academia admits. Not robots with flying cars, but more advanced than we currently give them credit for, and he cites evidence for this which both Stuart & Robin ignore in favour of critiquing Hancock for things he does not say.

They cite no sources and debate no actual claims. They use buzzwords and identity politics in place of analysis and between the two of them couldn’t fill one page of A4. It’s as if even they (and their editors) had no faith or interest in what they were doing.

Although Stuart does rather give the game away in his closing statement.

“That’s the danger of a show like this. It whispers to the conspiracy theorist in all of us. And Hancock is such a compelling host that he’s bound to create a few more in his wake. Believing that ultra-intelligent creatures helped to build the pyramids is one thing, but where does it end? Believing that election fraud is real? Believing 9/11 was an inside job? Worse?” 

He’s got me stumped there. Because, for the life of me, I literally can’t think of anything worse than ‘believing in election fraud’, which is obviously as fanciful as believing in the Loch Ness Monster. What next? Believing in tax evasion!?

Presumably he’s referring to the 2020 US election. Because the Guardian has claimed fraud is very real in some elections. Russia, Syria, Bolivia, Brazil, Libya, Afghanistan, Iran and Venezuela to name a few.

And they were pretty darn adamant that it was Russian collusion that got Trump into office in 2016.

Stuart presumably believes election fraud is only a ‘conspiracy theory’ when it happens here, in the UK. Either that or he believes it has literally never happened. Ever. In the whole history of the world.

Or perhaps he’s simply typing up any old nonsense just to get that word count a little higher. Sense and consistency be damned.

Who’s to say?

However, the fragile honesty underlying this is quite telling. He is essentially saying:

“If people become sceptical of one thing, they may become sceptical of another.”

Which is to be expected, but what I can’t understand is how anybody could think this is a bad thing.

People should be sceptical. Scepticism in all things but cynicism in none. People should ask questions, and they should expect answers, especially from those who profess to know them. One should be open-minded and always pursue the truth. And to better decipher what that may be, we need people sharing new ideas, questioning the mainstream view and challenging the established narrative as new evidence presents itself. We need that. Science, progress and discovery all depend on it. Even if the ideas turn out to be false. Prove them false.

In short: No one should be the gatekeepers of our history. Least of all those who laud their certitude in the face of the unknowable.

The mystery is exciting. The evidence is compelling. The series is engaging. Even if none of it turns out to be true, the questions are still worth asking.

These ideas are only ‘dangerous’ if you fear what they question.

And those who fear questions fear the truth.

JR Leach is a fantasy author and graphic designer whose debut novel The Farmer and the Fald was published earlier this year. You can follow him on Twitter or Substack and see more of his work on his website

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Not Doomed To Repeat It
Not Doomed To Repeat It
Jan 11, 2023 3:17 PM

The blatant hit pieces on Graham over the years were always so poorly written it’s hardly worth paying attention to but for amusement’s sake.

The claims of ancient, long forgotten civilizations and humanity being a species with amnesia is a concept Graham’s been exploring for many years. I’m not sure why this recent series would catch the ire of the establishment other than for its apparent popularity. As pointed out by other commenters here the most common tactic used by the media to censor ‘inconvenient truths’ or info it dislikes, is to simply ignore it. I suppose if a documentary critical of covid vaccines and Big Pharma were put on such a large platform as Netflix maybe the high IQs in the mainstream would be tasked/forced to write about it. Surely they’d be honest and strive for objectivity in their reporting if their past work is any indication.

On topic, one of the most fascinating things I was introduced to thanks to Graham was the Piri Reis maps (and similar world maps whose sources stretch far into antiquity). Compiled in the early 1500s and said to be based on even older source maps, the Piri Reis maps include depictions of Antarctica (even the name itself) when Antarctica wasn’t supposed to be ‘officially discovered’ until the 1820s. One would think such information would be more relevant to the public discourse, yet the status quo old, outdated, “official”, factually inaccurate information – persists. These old maps also depict land masses like the now sunken Bimini Road, clearly being shown as above sea level, indicating that the source for these old maps possibly dates back several millennia to a time when sea levels were much lower exposing certain land masses that are currently submerged.

Indeed there’s much humanity’s forgotten. It would seem that some entities with rather deep pockets may have a personal incentive in keeping certain topics and information largely out of the public discourse. Since they could never ignore Graham’s theories they’ve resorted to ridicule and ad hom in an effort to de-legitimize the information presented and steer the narrative in the direction they wanted it. The few actual arguments they do put forth have no basis in fact or reality, yet Graham is the one labeled a conspiracy theorist. That’s Pulitzer Prize level “reporting”.

Marcel Marien
Marcel Marien
Dec 25, 2022 12:33 AM

Briliant article. You made my day man! I don’t know where else I have met so much tighly packed, keen observation since Volker Pispers isn’t playing any more… I have been laughing till I ran out of breath!

Amanda
Amanda
Dec 15, 2022 4:50 AM

If you are into this sort of info, check out Ben Davidson’s Suspicious Observers youtube channel–it’s all about the 12,000 year disaster cycle (last one was 12,000 years ago). Apparently this is driven by the galactic current sheet, which brings cosmic dust and triggers the sun to have a micronova–basically a back to the stone age event. Watch his disaster cycle play lists. Also visit Doug Vogt’s youtube channel, DieholdFoundation–he says the micronova is going to be in 2046. Also check out Dr. Robert Schoch’s website (he’s a Professor of Geology at Boston University)– in the updated version of his book Forgotten Civilization, he talks about a solar catastrophe being on a 12,000 year cycle that basically triggers a new dark age. You can also just do a youtube search for “12,000 year disaster cycle” and pull up a number of videos on this. Also, read Velikovsky’s book Worlds in Collision, which goes over all the physical evidence of massive, epic level catastrophes all over the planet.

Ben Davidson says that the ruling elite psychopaths know this is coming, which is why they have DUMBs (deep underground military bases–at least here in the US), but they won’t necessarily survive.

Honestly, the last thing we need right now is for the ruling elite to be killing off humanity with the kill shots. For the survival of the human race, it seems like we need as big of a population as possible before we go into this. I think Ben Davidson said that after one of these micronovas (maybe the one 72,000 years ago), the population got down to 10,000 or so (based on genetic studies).

Amanda
Amanda
Dec 16, 2022 8:28 PM
Reply to  Amanda

Forgot to add that Ben Davidson also talks about the weakening magnetosphere and on-going shift of the magnetic poles–apparently, going forward in time, as the magnetosphere continues to weaken, more cosmic rays will reach Earth and trigger more extreme weather events (which TPTB will of course blame on “climate change”). Also, Doug Vogt’s best interview was on youtube with Creative Society: Geological evidence for the 12,000 year cycle of climate disasters | Douglas Vogt “

Amanda
Amanda
Dec 17, 2022 5:45 AM
Reply to  Amanda

THE Earth Disaster Documentaryhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihwoIlxHI3Q

Rorschach
Rorschach
Dec 15, 2022 1:44 AM

Ok, so this article prompted me to re-up my Netflix subscription just to watch this show.

Sean Sloan
Sean Sloan
Dec 14, 2022 2:46 AM

To give a tepid defense of the actions of the Powers That Be, on the level of cold blooded strategic calculation what happened makes perfect sense. If one presumes (there is some reason for misgiving) that the authorities are down on the ultra right then hostility to the ancient civilization thesis is to be expected because for a variety of reasons this is an idea that the ultra right tends to espouse.

It is unwise to assume that strict logic always prevails human affairs. In everyday life decisions and judgements are most commonly made on the basis of probability and credibility particularly in situations in which we lack extensive knowledge and expertise. As matters stand neonazis lack credibility while the authorities possess a lot of it. If the ancient civilization thesis is proven correct the ultraright gains credibility and the authorities lose credibility and our intuitive calculation of probabilities will change

I find Hancock interesting and worthwhile but many other people have done work that goes much deeper into these questions. For example:

Civilization One: The World Is Not as You Thought It Was
by Christopher Knight, Alan Butler

suggests that evidence for a profoundly different interpretation of world history is hiding in your kitchen drawer (2 feet differs from 61 cm by only .04 mm. and this is not by chance and the systems of measurement in the ancient and modern worlds mesh together far better than the theory that we learned in grade school about measurements being expressed as multiples of the magnitude of some royal appendage will allow.)

Certain works I have read can be interpreted as limited hangouts an attempt by strategic concessions of fact to avoid having to think about the really bizarre stuff. They can still be worth reading though.

Worlds in shadow : submerged lands in science, memory and myth
Nunn, Patrick D ;

Is a decorous climb down from the hard anti Atlantean position that nothing has ever sunk into the sea. Quite a lot has as the author relates while still maintaining unalterable opposition to the Atlantis story

In spite of the scholarly hostility expressed toward the works of Gavin Menzies, I suspect many academics have heaved a sigh of relief at the existence of a quasi mundane explanation for many peculiar occurrences.

Pilgrim Shadow
Pilgrim Shadow
Dec 14, 2022 2:41 AM

David Ho
David Ho
Dec 13, 2022 10:58 PM

What happened yesterday is a delusion. What happens tomorrow is a fantasy.
And I have no idea what is happening today, because the gap between delusion and fantasy is too fine to discern with any degree of certainty.

David Ho
David Ho
Dec 13, 2022 10:37 PM

History is a mystery only if the concept of long, really long periods of time that allow for incremental change to occur is not taken into accout. Nothing is static, even form and the function it gives rise to. For example, shortly after (10 million years after) the demise of the dinosaurs, 56 million years ago, the Himalayan mountains started to form, rising point 6 millimetres per year and eroding point three millimetres per year to attain the height they are today. Looked at over the greater geological history of just the Earth, not the infinite spans of time of the universe, it would appear to the unthinking mind the Himalayan mountains appeared on the scene fully formed. A mystery, indeed!
In that 47 million year blink of a God’s eye a lot can happen. How long have humans been around?

Blind Gill
Blind Gill
Dec 13, 2022 9:42 PM

Makes you wonder exactly what they are frightened of. GH has been writing since the 80s about this. Why now?

Blind Gill
Blind Gill
Dec 13, 2022 10:00 PM
Reply to  Blind Gill

Didn’t he also have a Ted Talk taken down and he and Rupert Sheldrake has to fight to get them up again? Fascinating. I think this is simply technocracy at work.

Doly Garcia
Doly Garcia
Dec 13, 2022 8:27 PM

Gosh, this must be the first time I enjoy an off-Guardian article. I thought it was worth letting you know.

Somebody had to have a go at all those inane critics. I sometimes read reviews because, well, I like to have movies a little spoiled before I watch them. But for the last five years, maybe more, movie reviews have been become more and more pointless to read. Like: I’m not going to tell you about the movie, I’m going to tell you about how some tiny details of the movie connect with whatever is the current cultural war worth fighting. What about, instead: I’m going to tell you about how some of the things in the movie are really, really timeless, and I honestly expect people will still like this bit of the movie ten or twenty years from now, whatever the news cycle is doing. Because that’s what reviews used to be like. I remember that.

OK, I’ll admit I’m a fan of Graham Hancock. And of some conspiracy theories. And one of my conspiracy theories is that Hancock is only telling some of the story… he intends for you to work out the rest. If you can.

And hey, if you go far back enough in time, yeah, any current race, white, indigenous or any color of the rainbow, can’t take credit of whatever happened then, because you know, genetics drift over time and you really can’t say that people that lived 40,000 years ago were any of the current races. Isn’t that wonderful?

johnnyo
johnnyo
Dec 15, 2022 12:57 AM
Reply to  Doly Garcia

Nice one DolyG, forty grand is a while back yes ?
favorite comment (because it sounds like I wrote it) in at least a few months 😍  😍  😎 

Mr. Liberty
Mr. Liberty
Dec 13, 2022 6:12 PM

With a little research, it’s very clear to me, that Mr. Hancock and his interpretations about history and archaeology is based on fantasies rather than reality. One example would be the pyramids in Egypt: These magnificent masterpieces of handicrafts has absolutely no connection to long-forgotten civilizations is purely nonsense, as we quite precisely knows who builded these monumental grave maosoleums. When fantasies and mysticism deliberately is combined with strange interpretation thoughts of reality, then the outcome always will be with errors, just as a sci-fi. It’s only a story told for entertainment and shouldn’t be understood as anything enlightening.

George Mc
George Mc
Dec 13, 2022 8:14 PM
Reply to  Mr. Liberty

That’s mostly pontificating invective. You cannot make something a fantasy by simply calling it a fantasy. Ditto mysticism and “strange interpretations” (“strange” by whose law?) Furthermore, in history (indeed most subjects) we never know “precisely” anything. Admission of possible error is always scientific. Also, every civilisation is “long forgotten” in the sense that we can never know “precisely” what it was.

Raoulo
Raoulo
Dec 14, 2022 5:01 AM
Reply to  Mr. Liberty

Dear Mr. Liberty, you are not at liberty to make stuff up about the ancient monuments of Egypt. This reflects very poorly on your acumen. Everyone who has even a very basic knowledge of the pyramids knows that no bodies, mummies, human remains, or sarcophagi were ever found in any of the Old Kingdom pyramids. The inside chambers of the Great Pyramid are completely bare and without ornaments. Also, the stone coffer has no lid and is empty. According to Heredotus, Cheops was not buried in the pyramid and his burial place was unknown and has never been found.

Xavier Delacroix
Xavier Delacroix
Dec 14, 2022 5:42 PM
Reply to  Raoulo

Look up The Floating Coffer Theory.

Raoulo
Raoulo
Dec 15, 2022 8:21 AM

Yes, that theory is compelling, but everything about the GP and the Giza Plateau seem to bring more questions than the answers we think we find. When dealing with such long time spans (12,000 years+), it’s easy to miss pieces of the puzzle. For instance, why didn’t the succeeding kingdoms use the GP for their own purposes? We know the coffer’s lid in the KC was removed (destroyed) at some point; is it possible that no one would have been able to breach the GP until the 10th Century, not even during the Early Dynastic period and through the New Kingdom era? Intriguing mystery. Thank you for mentioning this.

Xavier Delacroix
Xavier Delacroix
Dec 15, 2022 3:53 PM
Reply to  Raoulo

The descending passage was originally open.

Only when the water table lowered to the bottom of the descending passage could anyone discover the well shaft – enabling discovery of upper chambers. This would be after the time of Herodotus.

Only with the advent of steel tools could the likes of Al Mamoun embark upon tunnelling through the pyramid body in order to remove granite artefacts from the upper chambers.

dom irritant
dom irritant
Dec 14, 2022 6:21 AM
Reply to  Mr. Liberty

no we do not know who the built the giza pyramid it is off the scale mathematically and mausoleum that is what msm would like you to think

novictim
novictim
Dec 13, 2022 4:25 PM

Good article! Let me compare this to the Rosetta Stone.
For those on the totalitarian Left still capable of entertaining a subversive impulse, this article teaches the pattern of what passes for discourse among the intelligensia today. Because once you read and understand what these Guardian writers are really up to (Thought Policing), you can start to identify the thought control efforts everywhere.

From anthropogenic climate change to the Wuhan bioweapon to the mRNA vaccine deaths to even the collapse of the Big Bang theory’s ability to empirically verify its own predictions via JWST, we have been blinded to the shackles put on upon us by the gatekeepers of thought. Censorship is the least of their tools though it is the most often used. The smear and the side taking is even more effective.

For instance, “You must hate JK Rowling if you want to stay in the club! If you are not in the club, bad things will happen to you. You don’t want that, do you?”.

But here we are. Falsus in uno, falsus in omnibus! In that leap the Guardian was right to be worried. You cannot un-peak behind the curtain and unsee the wizard for whom he really is. The all powerful Oz, my ass.

And when you deny the good will of those who are skeptical, as today’s totalitarian Left is wont to do, what then is left? Cynicism. Anger. Malign distrust. Cynicism is the natural biproduct of the totalitarian system.

Because such cynicism is warranted. This attack on Graham Hancock is premeditated and deliberately unfair and these articles passed through their editors desks for a purpose, a very cynical purpose.

Simona
Simona
Dec 15, 2022 4:45 PM
Reply to  novictim

Truth! The elits, everywhere around the world, do not want us to think, study, gather and react. It is here in Europe exactly the same. Questions are welcome, but we also need answers!

Anna
Anna
Dec 13, 2022 4:17 PM

I like Hancock but I guess the whole point of the msm furore is to highlight the world ‘Apocalypse’ and what happened during and after the Younger Dryas.. They had little interest in him prior to this. Look where we’re heading again… (Their emphasis not mine).

Howard
Howard
Dec 13, 2022 4:15 PM

There’s an excellent documentary by Dr. Carmen Boulter entitled “The Pyramid Code” which likewise posits human “civilization” being much older than previously thought. Naturally, it’s controversial; but well worth considering.

rubberheid
rubberheid
Dec 13, 2022 2:18 PM

all a play on Hancock,

timed detraction.

interesting stuff tho’.

Edwige
Edwige
Dec 13, 2022 1:13 PM

If one assumes the broad fossil record isn’t somehow faked and their datings are broadly accurate, it appears that collections of larger animals exist for long periods of time then are wiped out and new ones emerge apparently fully formed.

There’s no gradual macro-evolution except in the delusions of early Darwinists. Where these mass extinctions and new collections of large animals come from remains a mystery.

David Ho
David Ho
Dec 13, 2022 10:33 PM
Reply to  Edwige

It is a mystery only if the concept of long, really long periods of time that allow for incremental change to occur. Nothing is static, even form and the function it gives rise to. For example, shortly after (10 million years after) the demise of the dinosaurs, 56 million years ago, the Himalayan mountains started to form, rising point 6 millimetres per year and eroding point three millimetres per year to attain the height they are today. Looked at over the greater geological history of just the Earth, not the infinite spans of time of the universe, it would appear to the unthinking mind the Himalayan mountains appeared on the scene fully formed. A mystery, indeed!
In that 47 million year blink of a God’s eye a lot can happen.

David Ho
David Ho
Dec 13, 2022 10:41 PM
Reply to  Edwige

It is a mystery only if the concept of long, really long periods of time that allow for incremental change to occur is not taken into accout. Nothing is static, even form and the function it gives rise to. For example, shortly after (10 million years after) the demise of the dinosaurs, 56 million years ago, the Himalayan mountains started to form, rising point 6 millimetres per year and eroding point three millimetres per year to attain the height they are today. Looked at over the greater geological history of just the Earth, not the infinite spans of time of the universe, it would appear to the unthinking mind the Himalayan mountains appeared on the scene fully formed. A mystery, indeed!
In that 47 million year blink of a God’s eye a lot can happen. How long have humans been around?

Raoulo
Raoulo
Dec 14, 2022 5:29 AM
Reply to  David Ho

If what you’re saying was true, we would be able to find archeological evidence of at least some of these various incremental changes, but of course we don’t. It also makes sense that any life form that’s not already fully-adapted to its environments would have no chance of surviving long enough to allow for the type of evolutionary changes of which you speak. As for the origin of mountain ranges, current science allows for causes other than the slow-motion process of time. The great Velikovsky made a very good case for the astronomical origin of much of our planet’s current geological features. The question to ask is why is academia and the ruling elite so afraid of the catastrophic interpretation of history?

Cyrus
Cyrus
Dec 14, 2022 3:25 AM
Reply to  Edwige

New species are created by the hybridization of existing species. The platypus being one of the more obvious examples.

Humans are hybrids as well, our ancient female ancestor obviously being a bonobo, and the male seems obvious as well if one ponders the question for a time, as has been exhaustively done by Dr. McCarthy at macroevolution.net

Simona
Simona
Dec 15, 2022 4:50 PM
Reply to  Edwige

Edwige, that is exactly my way of thinking about dinosaurs!

Sam - Admin2
Admin
Sam - Admin2
Dec 15, 2022 5:01 PM
Reply to  Edwige

I fully agree, it’s fascinating. A2

Brian of Nazareth
Brian of Nazareth
Dec 13, 2022 1:04 PM

Ah, have a look at the “Akashic record” if you want to know the truth about the past, (clairvoyants only) Rudolf Steiner wrote some wacky and amazing stuff about Atlantis and much more.

Placental_Mammal
Placental_Mammal
Dec 13, 2022 11:50 AM

Interesting

There is so much of history that is unknown and should be investigated. How did our distant pre agricultural allegedly unsophisticated ancestors go about creating domestic animals by breeding ? This was the first step in creating “civilizations”. Also how did the bankers of the first century create Christianity ? How did they a few centuries later create a rival monotheism ? These are some of the many questions I’d like to see answered. Speculation and wild unproveable theories are probably wild goose chases the banksters have their subjects waste their time on. Wild goose chases that take them away from portions of history that are forbidden.

David Ho
David Ho
Dec 13, 2022 10:46 PM

Yeah, and domesticated grasses, like wheat and barley. How did that happen?

semaj
semaj
Dec 14, 2022 12:27 PM
Reply to  David Ho

Just like us I think, always been here.

krzltf
krzltf
Dec 13, 2022 6:49 AM

If the hired goons at the guardian write that Hancock’s series is dangerous, then it probably means he’s on to somethiing.

The quackademics in archeology have been trying to silence Hancock for decades now. They just can’t come up with any evidence to disprove his theories, so they do the only thing they can do, use the No. 1 “scientific” method: smearing.

Emily Durron
Emily Durron
Dec 13, 2022 5:46 AM

In a mark of how insidious the modern age truly is, there are those in the establishment and its various tentacles, especially the Guardian, that perceive themselves to be the owners of the truth. As its owners, they cannot allow the truth to be challenged or even discussed. This applies to their ideas about Covid and climate change and anything else that they declare to be off limits. Now Graham Hancock has been given both barrels.

What they would have done to Alfred Wegener and his madcap theories on “continental drift” does not bear imagining.

entitled2
entitled2
Dec 13, 2022 9:47 AM
Reply to  Emily Durron

Guardian sigh!!!!

especially the Guardian, that perceive themselves to be the owners of the truth.

Isnt just them though is it Emily…, that perceive themselves to be the owners of the truth.
As members have learnt the hard way on the CTTF forum.
Your absolutely clueless to think that theses forums run by whoever have free speech…. Especially with over zealous keepers moderating what is allowed…

NixonScraypes
NixonScraypes
Dec 12, 2022 11:22 PM

All publicity is good publicity. I used to wonder what had happened to Colonel Blimp. The exact same personality (disorder) is now Activist Snowfake. Such larks Master Pip. Cheddar Man MAY have been black but that’s not racist. That cold stuff on the ground isn’t white, it’s not snow, it’s extreme weather made of carbon fuelled by fossils of trees that grew in the arctic circle when warm was cold and women were men and glad of it.

Veri Tas
Veri Tas
Dec 12, 2022 10:52 PM

Nazis also brushed their teeth and wore shoes, I believe, neither of which shall I be taking part in from this day onwards, just to be sure.”

Didn’t the Nazis also have a breeding program to ensure the ‘purity of race’ or some shit like that? – The same sort of program that’s in the works for humanity with compliments of “them” today?

Pilgrim Shadow
Pilgrim Shadow
Dec 13, 2022 9:27 PM
Reply to  Veri Tas

“Master race” or “God’s chosen people.” There’s some kind of irony there, I think.

Voz 0db
Voz 0db
Dec 12, 2022 10:18 PM

A “warmer than present” Arctic climate from 9,000 to 3,500 years ago was suitably warm enough to sustain aquatic species like sponges and frogs, and to satisfy the year-round food energy requirements of moose that feed primarily on aquatic trees (leaves, twigs, buds) and vegetation.

(Brown et al., 2022

https://academic.oup.com/pnasnexus/article/1/5/pgac209/6751926 ) 

Birch and pine forests permeated the northernmost regions of Arctic Norway until about 1,500 years ago, when it became too cold.

In the image below, notice the birch prevalence during the “modern” period (bottom chart) is smaller than at any time in the last 10,000 years. Or notice there is no pine forest presence in the “modern” period for the first time in the last 11,000 years.

comment image

These findings are consistent with other studies indicating the coasts of the Arctic Ocean were forest-covered during the Early Holocene, affirming the Arctic was anywhere from 2.5 to 7°C warmer than today during a period when CO2 levels were about 260 ppm.(McDonald et al., 2000 –

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0033589499921233) 
NickM
NickM
Dec 12, 2022 9:01 PM

Graun hack Stuart groans: “but where does it end? Believing 9/11 was an inside job? Worse?”

What could be worse than believing 911 was an inside job?

George Mc
George Mc
Dec 12, 2022 10:18 PM
Reply to  NickM

Believing the Graud is a real newspaper is worse.

KiwiJoker
KiwiJoker
Dec 12, 2022 8:25 PM

“Atlantis”: is the REAL name for the continents since renamed: America.

Mucho
Mucho
Dec 12, 2022 7:58 PM

And another one……

Second World Cup journalist ‘died suddenly’ after Grant Wahl passes away: report | Fox News

A second journalist covering the World Cup in Qatar died Sunday just hours after American soccer journalist Grant Wahl passed away.

Khalid al-Misslam, a Qatari, was a photojournalist for Al Kass TV and “died suddenly” while covering the tournament in the country, according to the Gulf-Times.

JustPlainBill
JustPlainBill
Dec 12, 2022 7:36 PM

Great article, but perhaps we’re giving this far more ink than it deserves.

I’ve read a couple of Hancock’s books, and just finished watching the series (which I thought was well produced). I heard a few days ago that there was a great deal of hubbub about the show, and for the life of me, could not figure out why.

If archeologists are taking exception to it as being incorrect or not provable, that is fine; that is all part of legitimate scientific/historical debate. But I’m having a tough time understanding where the “racist” and “dangerous” labels are coming from. The show is about ancient structures almost all of which are being discovered in parts of the world that have been populated by non-whites almost since forever. The ancient Americas were populated by indigenous Americans; Indonesia, Cambodia, etc. go without saying. Even the cultures of the Mediterranean islands would barely qualify as “white”. Are the critics insulted because Hancock never makes it any farther into Africa than Egypt?

Justin
Justin
Dec 12, 2022 8:18 PM
Reply to  JustPlainBill

But the structures are older than those indigenous peoples. And, if it was a global civilization, then it must have been a white one! Because ”racism”!!!

That’s the gist of it anyway. Saying the stuff wasn’t built by the people there now must mean racism.

oddly
oddly
Dec 12, 2022 10:20 PM
Reply to  JustPlainBill

there was a great deal of hubbub about the show, and for the life of me, could not figure out why.

fake binary..
BTW Hancock is the woke Indiana Jones.

trev
trev
Dec 12, 2022 7:14 PM

I heard Contagion was much better….but seriously, who has Netflix or Disney etc. anyway? That’s a bit 20th century.

oddly
oddly
Dec 12, 2022 7:14 PM

People should be sceptical. Scepticism in all things but cynicism in none.

 😂 

stu
stu
Dec 12, 2022 7:11 PM

Good essay.

These “critics”are serving as gatekeepers for, in this case, the academic archaeology orthodoxy. I was surprised they did not mention the dangers of the quackccine in their inexhaustible list of “conspiracy theories” of danger and thus to be avoided.

They would not wish to draw attention to those at this point in the Psy Op perhaps.

Heavens forbid anyone should ask questions of the various priesthoods, whether the professional archaeologists or the health bureaucracats.

I found Hancock’s presentations interesting and often compelling.

Ironically their warnings are likely to increase interest in the series. In the showbiz world a bad review is often better than no review that is, being ignored.

These writers are really stupid.

Voz 0db
Voz 0db
Dec 12, 2022 6:47 PM

What we fail to understand is that archeology and all the entertainments uman animals invented that deal with the Past are nothing more nothing less than pure Imagination…

In reality all these theories/imaginations have the same value… We are just making stuff up as we go along!

So there is no valid reason for the mainstream Imaginatiologists to be so upset with this new Imagination. They want have to return any of the wasted funds and prizes just because we eventually decide that this Imagination is better than the previous one.

David Ho
David Ho
Dec 13, 2022 10:51 PM
Reply to  Voz 0db

What happened yesterday is a delusion. What happens tomorrow is a fantasy.
And I have no idea what is happening today, because the gap between delusion and fantasy is too fine to discern with any degree of certainty.

dom irritant
dom irritant
Dec 14, 2022 6:36 AM
Reply to  David Ho

what a load of manure

David Ho
David Ho
Dec 15, 2022 3:53 AM
Reply to  dom irritant

The manure is in the reader’s eye, unable to fully grasp the complexity of the gist.

Raoulo
Raoulo
Dec 14, 2022 7:40 AM
Reply to  Voz 0db

Frankly, when it comes to remnants of ancient advanced civilisations, such as the ancient pyramids and megalithic structures, it’s beyond anyone’s imagination; more on the scale of cognitive dissonance.

George Mc
George Mc
Dec 12, 2022 5:12 PM

Well let’s pause for a little reflection here. Since the dawn of covid, we have seen – and in the most brutal way – what the media is and how the media works. It is centralised to a degree I never imagined and it works in the most audaciously deceptive and censorious way. How it censors is quite breath-taking: It simply ignores.

And this is one reason why the covid script was so traumatic. I kept thinking that sooner or later they would have to answer screamingly obvious questions e.g. How trustworthy are the covid statistics – both for cases and deaths? How safe were these vaccines? Why did we need the vaccines in the first place? What evidence do we have that covid was anything out of the ordinary?

These questions – and they are only the proverbial tip of the iceberg – were questions I kept expecting to be addressed. At the very least I kept expecting some acknowledgement of dissident groups critiquing the whole thing.

Almost three years later – and there has been nothing!

A few murmurings of “crazy conspiracy nuts”, “Far Right disinfo merchants” etc. If you want an answer to why so many of the population still fall for all this crap, it’s because – astonishing as it may seem – they haven’t heard anything else!

And that is how it works. The media doesn’t even have to make the multiple elephants in the room disappear. The elephants are never admitted into the room in the first place!

Now do you really think anything genuinely critical of the covid crap will get its own series on Netflix? No fucking way! So that puts Graham Hancock into perspective. If the media can lie to our faces by telling people who are perfectly healthy that they are ill and that they need an untested vaccine, then they really don’t care one way or the other about what happened thousands of years ago. If they can manufacture “The Science” right in front of you, I’m sure they can manufacture “The Archaeology” too! 

ChairmanDrusha
ChairmanDrusha
Dec 12, 2022 5:53 PM
Reply to  George Mc

I agree with you in at least the point that Netflix is a curated platform for propaganda that offers the illusion of choice to the dumb dumbs looking for some lite entertainment to while away their free time.

oddly
oddly
Dec 12, 2022 7:21 PM
Reply to  ChairmanDrusha

Netflix’s with Golden boy Graham like Elon with Twitter is the The Spirit Of Truth. now.?
Seems alternative media drunk the koolaid.
comment image

Pilgrim Shadow
Pilgrim Shadow
Dec 12, 2022 9:07 PM
Reply to  oddly

The Spirit of Truth inspires investigation and questioning.

mgeo
mgeo
Dec 13, 2022 7:23 AM
Reply to  George Mc

Censorship goes beyond ignoring to deregistering publications, or sacking editors, academics or doctors.

The covid affair has not been “nothing”. The demands and prohibitions, and the treatments including jabs, killed or injured many

Simona
Simona
Dec 15, 2022 5:13 PM
Reply to  George Mc

George, I agree with you. 3 years after the Covid-crisis we still do not know what exactly is inside those vaccines, why we had to sign a “discharge responsability form” (at least here in italy) before being shot and why so many people kept on dying of covid, despite the vaccine, and aboveall why so many young people are dying “suddendly”, unexpectedly and for “unknown” reasons!

Balgorg
Balgorg
Dec 12, 2022 4:42 PM

We all eventually get through the Graham Hancock stage and arrive back where we started. For a while the whole implausibility is exciting, has hints of the Stargate Series, and beyond.

Ancient technologies, apocalypse, but reality cuts in before random mountains become pyramids, unusual rock formations are shaped artificially, and rock becomes a form of geopolymer.

Spent many years reading similar stuff by many authors, great fun all of it. Cleverly put together, but simply bonkers at the end of the day.
Sells books though.

SeverleyRegarded
SeverleyRegarded
Dec 12, 2022 5:02 PM
Reply to  Balgorg

It is bonkers to suggest ancient megaliths and artifacts were formed naturally. Unless you are being are paid to post here?

Pilgrim Shadow
Pilgrim Shadow
Dec 12, 2022 8:49 PM
Reply to  Balgorg

We still don’t know how the pyramids were built.

boxofcrayons
boxofcrayons
Dec 13, 2022 2:22 AM
Reply to  Pilgrim Shadow

’twere giant ants that stacked them…..feel better now ?

🙂

MaryLS
MaryLS
Dec 13, 2022 3:03 AM
Reply to  Pilgrim Shadow

Correct. Coral Castle also. I think these are the key to new energy sources.

Pilgrim Shadow
Pilgrim Shadow
Dec 13, 2022 6:14 PM
Reply to  MaryLS

Should certainly make one wonder.

Balgorg
Balgorg
Dec 13, 2022 4:12 PM
Reply to  Balgorg

Lol, so many downvotes….
A great many ‘believers’ on here, maybe you should all join the Nibiru Countdown on Facebook.

But a little more seriously. I do understand why many who frequent OFG flock to the likes of Hancock, because he offers a kind of conspiratorial take on established archaeology, by suggesting that the mainstream academics are deliberately hiding/avoiding/concealing the truth. In which case I agree, but I don’t think there’s a conspiracy. Rather, it’s just a bunch of jumped up university types who have the precious ticket of a qualification and the peer reviewed documentation to support their theories.

I am myself an armature landscape archaeologist, and my specialty is the study of megalithic monuments.
I do not go along with all established opinion, but I also do not simply follow authors like Hancock and his take on the past.
I to my own research on the ground, and have been doing so for 30 years. With many discoveries, like new stone circles, stone avenues, burial sites etc.

What I see is that Hancocks work, like many others, has created a kind of religion with followers, who dont do their own research on the ground, simply reading books that take their fancy to prop up their feelings about something, rejecting what does not.
Pure and simple. Cancel culture…

George Mc
George Mc
Dec 13, 2022 8:24 PM
Reply to  Balgorg

As Michael Parenti has noted, it is those who take the minority view (which Hancock has) who are more likely to be more open minded and fair. The “religious” tag refers more aptly to the generally accepted concensus which is so temptingly comfortable.

George Mc
George Mc
Dec 13, 2022 8:20 PM
Reply to  Balgorg

As I said to Mr Liberty above, you cannot make something implausible or “bonkers” just by calling it these things. I would have thought that one thing the covid claptrap has taught us is not to fall for that blase snooty presumption that simply takes an argument so much for granted that it doesn’t even bother to explicitly acknolwedge that it is an argument.

Balgorg
Balgorg
Dec 15, 2022 7:25 AM
Reply to  George Mc

Hancock almost pioneered a style of writing that sounds very convincing, almost like some amalgam of an adventure story with conspiracy and pseudo science, many authors have done something similar in a sensationalist manner, Lomas and Knight for example. I love these works, and have enjoyed delving into them, and wishing I could ape their style. But no longer can these viewpoints as exhibited by these authors be considered as a minority viewpoint, if anything, the work of scholars trained (some would say indoctrinated) in their field are barely listened to by readers and adherents to the alternative sensationalists like Hancock. The scholarly works are stuffy, hard to read, full of big words, and full of references that all need to be followed up.
These days the sensationalist view has overtaken the scholarly, and the latter is now the minority view, although it presents itself as authorative.
The danger with the sensationalist view is that it doesn’t always check out when given full scrutiny, and a great many adherants are fooling themselves. Hence my above references to the wilder fringes like geopolymer etc, it’s all too much like a belief system.
I consider this megolthomania as a pollutant to a cause that is causing a great deal of harm to what really is a sensible subject.
I occupy the middle ground, never a great place to be, because you receive flak from both extremes.

Meimou
Meimou
Dec 29, 2022 7:58 PM
Reply to  Balgorg

Watch show then get back to us with your condescending review of it ok?

Functional T
Functional T
Dec 12, 2022 4:26 PM

I dare not ponder.

Mucho
Mucho
Dec 12, 2022 3:53 PM

And another one:

Sports Writer Grant Wahl, 48, Dies While Covering World Cup (buzzfeednews.com)

The sports world is paying tribute to prominent soccer journalist Grant Wahl following the news of his death in Qatar, where he was covering the men’s World Cup.
Wahl, 48, collapsed at Lusail Stadium in the waning minutes of Friday’s Argentina–Netherlands quarterfinal, according to other reporters who were covering the match. Paramedics attended to Wahl and performed CPR, NPR reported. He was then transported to Hamad General Hospital in Doha, the Qatari government said.

Wahl’s death was confirmed on social media by his wife, infectious disease doctor Céline Gounder; his brother Eric Wahl; and the US Soccer Federation.
“I am so thankful for the support of my husband @GrantWahl’s soccer family & of so many friends who’ve reached out tonight,” Gounder tweeted. “I’m in complete shock.”
In an emotional Instagram video, Eric Wahl said he suspected foul play, noting that his brother had received death threats after being briefly detained ahead of the USA–Wales group match on Nov. 21 for wearing a shirt in support of the LGBTQ community. Same-sex relationships are illegal in Qatar.
“My brother was healthy,” Eric Wahl said. “I do not believe my brother just died. I believe he was killed.”
Eric Wahl did not immediately respond to BuzzFeed News’ request for comment Saturday. Representatives for the US State Department, US Soccer, and FIFA did not respond to questions about his suspicions.
Eric Wahl later clarified that he made those statements out of shock and “didn’t know it would go everywhere.”
“There’s obviously no way I know anything certain,” he tweeted over the weekend. “Our family will await word from American doctors, and we have faith that the US government people with whom we’ve been in contact are doing everything they can do to help us get answers.”
Throughout the tournament, the host country has continued to face criticism for its anti-LGBTQ laws and record on human rights, including from Wahl, who as recently as Thursday called out Qatari organizers for their apathy over migrant worker deaths on his website and his Substack, Fútbol with Grant Wahl.
While a cause of death has not yet been released, Wahl had recently complained of a persistent cough and illness on his website and in his podcast.
“My body finally broke down on me,” Wahl wrote in a Dec. 5 post before going on to detail a grueling schedule of “little sleep” and “high stress.”
“What had been a cold over the last 10 days turned into something more severe on the night of the USA-Netherlands game,” he wrote, “and I could feel my upper chest take on a new level of pressure and discomfort.”
Wahl said he believed he had bronchitis and received treatment from the medical clinic where he was given antibiotics and some cough syrup.

I hope Eric Wahl’s anger is directed into exposing these injections for what they are – a banker tool of genocide.

Mucho
Mucho
Dec 12, 2022 4:04 PM
Reply to  Mucho

They’ll be pulling white crap out of his veins, only to report that anti LGBT Muslims put them there. Blaming Muslims for banker crimes is par for the course for The Scum.

nylon
nylon
Dec 12, 2022 3:42 PM

Trees and other plants have been found under polar’s ice and the discovery has been used to feed the climate change narrative and to demostrate how drastic it could be.
But even if the temperatures at the poles were at tropical levels at some point, how could plants possibly grow in a place with six months of darkness?

Pilgrim Shadow
Pilgrim Shadow
Dec 12, 2022 8:53 PM
Reply to  nylon

“Trees and other plants have been found under polar ice and the discovery has been used to feed the climate change narrative and to demonstrate how drastic it could be.”

Usually that, and things like flash frozen mammoths, are used to argue in favor of a sudden polar shift, rather than gradual climate change.

rubberheid
rubberheid
Dec 13, 2022 1:44 PM
Reply to  Pilgrim Shadow

fossilised trees, snags (standing deadwood), that straddle 100.000+ year sediments? really? that sounds more like a flood or volcano… (why’d they not fall over or burn then..?)

I agree Pilgrim.

mgeo
mgeo
Dec 13, 2022 7:27 AM
Reply to  nylon

Plants (including trees) adapt (evolve).

Marian
Marian
Dec 12, 2022 2:58 PM

No one has found Atlantis. However somewhere in the Atlantic Ocean would make sense, hence the ocean’s name. Without actual discovery no one can even guess what the Atlanteans looked like. So why are the mouthpieces of the establishment squawking racists here? It is almost as if their bosses do not want us to know about our ancient past. Why? What do they know that they don’t want we the little people to know? Very odd.

Pilgrim Shadow
Pilgrim Shadow
Dec 13, 2022 2:44 PM
Reply to  Marian

Antarctica.

Edwige
Edwige
Dec 12, 2022 2:33 PM

It’s an extremely curious thing that there were three “great” finds that solidified Darwinist theory in the early Twentieth Century – Java Man, Peking Man and Piltdown Man – and the Jesuit Pierre Teilhard de Chardin was present in each case.

Unsurprising too that one finds certain “philanthropic” foundations like Carnegie and Rockefeller were also deeply involved in them….

NickM
NickM
Dec 12, 2022 3:02 PM
Reply to  Edwige

Piltdown skull was a fake, but the other two are genuine. Not a bad score for Chardin, 2/3 for “being present” at the first Missing Links. Backed up by more finds by later archaeologists. As for involvement by Carnegie and Rockefeller crime syndicates (presumably by funding “the Jesuit’s” scientific research):

“We in The Salvation Army are thankful to get some money out of the Devil’s hands and put it to good use” — Shaw, Major Barbara.

I stand in UK rain
I stand in UK rain
Dec 12, 2022 2:15 PM

If the Handcock encourages people to question authority, then good. Another chip off the edifice. Keep chiseling.

Cynicon Implant
Cynicon Implant
Dec 12, 2022 2:11 PM

I love pondering the possibilities of advanced ancient civilizations. It’s fun and interesting. I also love tweaking people who insist on trying to protect their status quo fiefdoms (monopolies?) with stupid arguments like “the science is settled.”

ophiaps
ophiaps
Dec 12, 2022 1:57 PM

Graham Hancock Plagiarist & Scavenger

https://www.michaeltsarion.com/hancock-the-scavenger.html

NickM
NickM
Dec 12, 2022 3:13 PM
Reply to  ophiaps

From your Link:

“Hancock – the darling of Macmillan, Random House and other publishing companies – has made millions from his career as an author of weighty fictional and nonfictional works. His excursions into prehistory, catastrophism and conspiracy prove to be his most popular sellers.

In 2010 I discovered that Hancock employs at least three ghostwriters, one of whom contacted me because of his interest in the forgotten genius Comyns Beaumont. During our lengthy conversations, this man let a few things slip about how little research Hancock himself does, and how much he gets paid for it.

Hancock has written a few books with bestselling author Robert Bauval. Their theories on the age of the Great Pyramid have been widely accepted as true, even when they are nothing of the kind. Nevertheless, Bauval and Hancock have netted many millions purveying their grand but spurious theories. The media has assisted them”

[Note by NickM: The Atlantis Kerfluffle reminds me of The Da Vinci Code: “You gotta give the Public hoke”]

Brianborou
Brianborou
Dec 12, 2022 8:25 PM
Reply to  ophiaps

please first make it clear that Michael Tsarion is not his real name. It is what is known as an alias or pseudonym which simply means, “professional title; assumed name; epithet; label; monicker; handle; nickname; stage name; pen name; nome de plume; alter ego.” Tsarion’s real name is Brian Heatley and his stage name or alter ego is “Michael Tsarion.”

Edwige
Edwige
Dec 12, 2022 1:09 PM

“Why has this been allowed?”

Liberals who believe in free speech and open competition of ideas have become as distant a memory as leftists who are anti-war.

(Of course almost every word in that last sentence could, and probably should, be in inverted commas – but I can’t be bothered).

I stand in UK rain
I stand in UK rain
Dec 12, 2022 1:58 PM
Reply to  Edwige

Great point. All is inverted. World of turned upside down.

NickM
NickM
Dec 12, 2022 8:10 PM

“Sanction”, which comes from Latin [and is usually prescribed in a generous spirit “To Allow” thus: I sanction this marriage] now means “To Forbid”. Yet another debasement of our Verbal Currency: turning words which used to indicate something good and generous into something evil and mean-spirited.

“The first records of Sanction come from the 1500s. It is derived from the Latin sancīre, meaning “to prescribe by law.” Sancīre also means “to make holy” and is the root of words like Sanctify and Sanctuary.”

https://www.dictionary.com

Blackwater River
Blackwater River
Dec 12, 2022 12:34 PM

Whilst reading this article and the educated comments below, I can only conclude that my entry to the rabbit holes of philosophical exploration has only just begun.

Eight tabs are now open:

Temple at Gobekli Tepe
Philotheos Bryennios images
Evidence of city of Troy
Vedic religion source of Hinduism ( Sunak, A Brahman swore oath on bhagavad gita)
Ben Davidson (suspicious 0bservers)
Randall Carlson
IHASFEMR

And I am only half way through comments.

Hats off to all you well researched on the esoteric questions found here on this site.

Seansaighdeor
Seansaighdeor
Dec 12, 2022 12:14 PM

Off-G has had a bit of an obsession lately (at least as far as I can see) regarding ‘fake binaries’ but this looks to be a perfect example.

Its an interesting article but the series is limited and Hancock has been pushing the same ideas for over 30 years. Those familiar with his books will understand that.

To me he is the modern equivalent of Erich Von Daniken but perhaps a better analogy would be an archaeological version of David Icke. He takes some interesting ideas – that all ancient cultures reference a great flood and possible cataclysm some 10,500 years ago – but hasn’t really moved on from there.

There is no doubt evidence of a ‘high culture’ in antiquity because the stone works of central and south America and pyramid culture demonstrate that. Carl Munck has illustrated world wide sites connected on trans-continental grid basis and the pyramid builders demonstrated a culture with advanced mathematical knowledge.

Hancock doesn’t reference any ancient cultures or narrative through a biblical prism but like Icke seeks to ‘hoover’ up the disaffected intellectuals who know that what mainstream science teaches is bs.

There have been stories of his connections to societies such as the freemasons and that is worth bearing in mind when trying to understand his perspective. The fact that Netflix have provided a ‘global’ audience should also raise some questions.

Main stream science teaches us humans crawled out of the swamp some thousands of years ago becoming land mammals and that the first humans were from Africa. So challenging that is no doubt ‘racist’ because it undermines the whole evolutionary ethos and our African ‘origins’.

But that doesn’t mean he is in any way right and he doesn’t make any earth shattering statements in any of the shows either. It was an enjoyable series but apart from learning about the individual sites referenced doesn’t provide any earth shattering insight either.

Completely manufactured outrage.

ophiaps
ophiaps
Dec 12, 2022 1:39 PM
Reply to  Seansaighdeor

Spanky hanky

The usual alt media lot, miss the point completely.
1st, do a rewind with oligarchy favorite Hancock.

OK didn’t he have a ted talk interview faked banned.?

yes Mr pied piper of Ayahuasca & psychedelic drugs got his The ancient alien lot took mushrooms crap- to gain consciousness etc
drugged up ansisters dribble, this was at the time when ayahuasca psychedelic drugs was being marketed massively – him , Joke rogan, Truth Frequency Radio – it was everywhere and Hanky spanky was the leader of the take it take it and go on and take it crowd.
(2003 if I remember).

The ted talk video being banned was on YouTube and had more views than if it wasn’t banned like this recent crap aligns it self with K**yo W**t & K8rie Ir*ing ‘H$br*w To N*gro*s’ Hoax which his post upset the apple cart of the discussing the unspeakable (I notice how you and certain parts of the MSM alt media dont dare mention that). How Akismet places any mention of the names in pending. Unlike Hanky Spanky Hancock he bypasses everything.

Hanky spank hoax is another form of must watch to see what is being said. personality Alex Jones and them lot, still do this type of cheap PR which the MSM alt media and its not so wise fanbase fall for time and time again.

Its not banned nor should it be, it is shit PR to get the lost people to go watch it on a full moon and channel the subversive symbolism crap it subliminal messages installed into your little minds.

This part is bullshit.

The fact Hancock never mentions race, or white people (or aliens) in the series, nor (to the best of my knowledge) in any of his books, makes no difference to this.

He does.

Little known facts about Hancock. *they do like their Hancocks)

Your spanky hanky was whitewashed from history, he used to be a P.A to a famous south African murdering leader during the not so nice years.

He fools the retards, who haven’t done the basic back ground checks or there amnesia minds cant remember the last time he was so called banned or haven’t read other books on alternative history. His books are number one in WHS SMITH, Barnes and Noble, Warlmart etc etc. that is a red flag.

That should ring alarm bells that Mr censored is being promoted.

Like the internet shills who where advocates on the safe and effective during bs19 who all in coordinated effect changed there minds during midterms.

Hanky spanky no longer recommends psychedelic drugs especially ayahuasca.
That video is hard to find but it is out there.
He has also robbed a lot of other people work Plagiarist remixed it, has ghostwriters re packaged it watered it down to sell to idiots.

He serves a purpose. Your being played

Brianborou
Brianborou
Dec 12, 2022 9:03 PM
Reply to  Seansaighdeor

Hancocks, Foester and others ask questions which MSArchaeologists, just like the MSJournalists, refuse to investigate. IE The Great Pyramid has approximately 2,500,000 1ton Stone blocks in its construction which are so perfectly cut and aligned that it is almost impossible to get a cigarette paper between them.

Moreover in the Kings chamber, deep inside the pyramid, there are a number of approximately 70 ton perfectly cut granite blocks in bedded about 25 metres from the floor in the chamber. How was this done ? With copper/ bronze chisels, hammers and rope, pulleys and slaves ?

Furthermore in the Baalbek Lebanon, there are gigantic cut granite megaliths weighing between 800 to over 1600 tons. How was this done with copper/ bronze/ iron chisels and then raised upright by ropes and pulleys powered by men and horses plus transported to their destinations?

A feat which even modern cranes would find daunting.

It is also interesting that the notion rammed down man’s throats modern “ civilisation “ began 6,000 years ago in Mesopotamia has finally be demonstrated to be false with the discovery of Gobekli Tepe dating from approximately 11,500 years ago.

The argument against Hancock is in a long line of people who know which side their bread is buttered and intend to keep it so which means keeping the mushrooms in the dark and fed on BS.

Edwige
Edwige
Dec 12, 2022 11:08 AM

Conan Doyle gets a mention in the article so a few things about him:
1) He was a Freemason (member of the Portsmouth lodge).
2) He promoted Spiritualism, a movement that looks designed to comfort the grief-stricken and sidetrack their righteous anger at the true killers of their relatives.
3) Sherlock Holmes was a drug (cocaine) addict so we get an early example of equating drugs with raised consciousness.
4) His more intelligent brother worked for British intelligence.
5) Conan Doyle wrote a short story in 1913 called ‘Danger!’. A fictional North European nation starves Britain through submarine warfare and ends up sinking a large passenger liner. It looks very like predictive programming for the ‘Lusitania’ (btw commonly called the ‘Lusi’ i.e. Lucifer. See also a famous Beatles’ song and, to bring things back to archaelogy, what does humanity’s oldest know African ancestor happen to have been dubbed but Lucy?). Maybe this could be written off as coincidence or Conan Doyle’s genius if the ‘Titanic’ hadn’t been predicted by another short story, ‘The Wreck of the Titan’ in 1898.

For anyone questioning mainstream archaelogy (or science generally), I recommend Cremo and Thompson’s ‘Forbidden Archaeology’. Be aware they have an agenda (to substantiate their Vedic beliefs) but at least they are upfront about it. One doesn’t have to agree with their conclusions to find their assemblage of evidence of anomalous archaelogical finds interesting and their work a compelling example of how a “scientific” consensus is maintained (establish your paradigm, fit evidence into it, dismiss all evidence that doesn’t on any and every ground that you don’t apply to evidence that fits your paradigm including resorting to ridicule, destroying careers/ finds and ultimately simply going silent).

banana
banana
Dec 12, 2022 11:22 AM
Reply to  Edwige
Mark Gobell
Mark Gobell
Dec 14, 2022 9:26 AM
Reply to  Edwige

It looks very like predictive programming for the ‘Lusitania’ (btw commonly called the ‘Lusi’ i.e. Lucifer. See also a famous Beatles’ song and, to bring things back to archaelogy, what does humanity’s oldest know African ancestor happen to have been dubbed but Lucy?). Maybe this could be written off as coincidence …

According to the narrative of Lucy (Australopithecus) : ( Wikipedia ) :

That first evening they celebrated at the camp; at some stage during the evening they named fossil AL 288-1 “Lucy”, after the Beatles’ song “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” (1967), which was being played loudly and repeatedly on a tape recorder in the camp.[17]

Thom 9
Thom 9
Dec 12, 2022 10:52 AM

No surprise really just more “garbage” journalism from The Guardian.
Perhaps “The Guardian” should be rebranded as “The (Marxist) Gate-Keeper”.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
Dec 12, 2022 10:18 AM

pole shifts! i recommend The Mobile Observatory Project

Steg
Steg
Dec 12, 2022 10:02 AM

I’ve been on board with Graham since 1995. He doesn’t pretend to be an archaeologist, he’s just a very good journalist. Being a journalist gives his an unbiased perspective and frees him from archaeological dogma. Accumulated evidence since 1995 has put him in good stead, especially with Gobekli Tepi and the recent discovery of asteroid strike in Greenland about 12,000 years ago. Too much further evidence to go into now. If I had to place a bet then I’d place the mid Atlantic, the Azores, as the most likely place.
What really bothers me is why so much pushback? Why ancient history is often stifled and not pursued with an open mind. I think it’s more than just academia dragging it’s heels. Gobekli Tepi archaeology has now all but halted, the same with the sphinx and Great Pyramids, Iraq looted or destroyed, same with Afghanistan etc. I wonder why?

mgeo
mgeo
Dec 12, 2022 12:40 PM
Reply to  Steg

Because too many experts would become subject to doubt, and too many texts may have to be revised. All the puffed-up self-importance of history as approved by the victors would be diluted.

It is like the beliefs concerning Greece as the soure of original ideas for the West. Or the cronology of the first millenium CE. Scientists are objective only in theory. Far less so in the social “sciences”.

Christine Thompson
Christine Thompson
Dec 12, 2022 4:12 PM
Reply to  mgeo

You’re so right when you use the term ‘CE’, as opposed to the ‘christian’ term, ‘AD’. I made that point in a post a few days ago here on OffG… it resulted in many (brainwashed…) people thumbing-down my comment for my having ‘dared’ to reject the [crazy] ‘christian’ terminology.

As I correctly stated in my posts on the timing terminology a few days ago, very many historians around the world correctly use the NON-‘christian’ dating terminology of ‘BCE’ and ‘CE’.

MolecCodicies
MolecCodicies
Dec 12, 2022 8:46 PM

I dont care for CE because it uses the same date as AD/BC, but now it doesnt clarify what its referring to. It’s counting from the year of “christ”, that’s just being accurate. Even if you don’t believe in Christ, that’s what the number is referring to. Unless you believe “Christ” spawned the “Common Era” whatever that means.

Christine Thompson
Christine Thompson
Dec 12, 2022 11:07 PM
Reply to  MolecCodicies

The terms ‘BCE’ and ‘CE’ (‘Before the Common Era’ & ‘Common Era’) are simply a non-‘christian’ terminology. Terms which people who are adamantly against the ‘christian’ cr*p choose to use.

(I’m very proud to be a properly-informed Spiritualist. Spiritualism being the one and only ‘religion’ that is able to absolutely PROVE what it claims)

MolecCodicies
MolecCodicies
Dec 12, 2022 11:45 PM

So you continue to count the years based on Christ, but no longer admit you do. And you find this righteous?

Christine Thompson
Christine Thompson
Dec 13, 2022 10:48 AM
Reply to  MolecCodicies

The millennia have to be referred to in some way, and we people who have not fallen for the ‘christian’ cr*p choose to use the NON-‘christian’ dating terminology of ‘BCE’ and ‘CE’. When I use those terms, I am never giving any reference to the merely claimed to exist character, ‘jesus’. I never ever fell for it, and am not going to start falling for it now, at the age of 64.

The vast majority of people who have fallen for the ‘christian’ nonsense (‘born of a virgin’ [haha!], ‘impregnated by the holy ghost’ [haha!], ‘walking on water’ [haha!], and so on & so on…) are not aware that there were many so-called ‘saviour gods’ who were claimed to exist, centuries and thousands of years prior to the claimed time of the merely claimed time of ‘jesus’. And all those other claimed ‘saviour gods’ had exactly the same things claimed of them as are claimed of the claimed ‘jesus’… for eg, ‘born on 25 December’, ‘born in a manger/stable’, ‘three wise men attended the birth’, ‘a bright star appeared at the time of their birth’, they ‘walked on water’, they ‘performed miracles’, they were crucified, etc etc.
But none of those merely claimed ‘saviour gods’ actually existed as real, historical people.

The people of those times used to worship the Sun. The Sun! That thing up in the sky that provides heat, warmth, growth, etc.
They even referred to it as ‘the Lord’! And ‘the Light of the world’!
Because they were referring to it, the Sun, literally being the thing which provides light.
A great deal of the writings that have been referred to as the ‘bible’ are allegorical in nature. Not to be taken literally.
Many scholars and historians (and even some honest ‘theologians’ etc) are fully informed on the fact that, in those days, the people did worship the Sun. And many such scholars and historians have made an excellent case for their claim that the claimed story of ‘jesus’ in the ‘bible’ is merely an allegorical representation of the Sun’s annual journey round the sky. That would enable much of the nonsense of the ‘jesus’ cr*p to make sense, if it is all an allegorical representation of the Sun’s journey round the ‘heavens’.
Ie, that the ‘gospels’ should not be taken literally.

The ‘day of worship’ for ‘christians’ is Sunday. SUNday!!

One of the many excellent books on the above is “The Christ Conspiracy: the greatest story ever SOLD”, by ‘Acharya S’: that being the pseudonym of Dorothy M Murdock [1960-2015].

I personally don’t give a fig whether ‘jesus’ exists or not. But I would be very happy to eventually learn that ‘he’ did not. That ‘he’ is merely a mythological character, to personify the Sun’s annual journey around the sky. It would be hilarious, in fact. For the stuff which ‘christians’ merely ‘believe’ (and I have a number of them in my own family… they know just what I think of them…) is beyond nonsense. I repeat… ‘born of a virgin’, ‘impregnated by the holy ghost’, ‘walking on water’… [haha!!]. They have no critical thinking skills.

Placental_Mammal
Placental_Mammal
Dec 13, 2022 11:30 AM

Most Christian mythicists bypass the fact that the banksters of the first century created the new testament for a multiplicity of reasons. Philo Judaeus of Alexandria was central to this effort as were his banker brother whose clientele included the top echelons of the Roman empire.

Christine Thompson
Christine Thompson
Dec 13, 2022 5:49 PM

Yes, there are some claims that the Piso family in Ancient Rome were involved in the creation of the writings that are called the ‘new testament’.

Thom Sheaffer
Thom Sheaffer
Dec 12, 2022 9:56 AM

My best friend is a jabbed normie but we nonetheless enjoyably talk and joke about many things as long as they’re not too “conspiratorial”. While I almost ache to tell him of the latest TLAV covid news I keep cool. And then maybe as kindness he lets his hair down and ponders aloud about how the ancient Egyptians did all they did. And that is where I see an in. I encourage him to talk about Egypt because just like with covid there are many questions anomalies and mysteries. All he needs to do now is switch to another YouTube channel.

George Mc
George Mc
Dec 12, 2022 9:35 AM

Our rulers are masters of psychological manipulation. If one avenue for divide and rule dries up, they can find another one often even out of the one that’s gone.

Thus racism. Excellent divide strategy. The civil rights movement seemed to threaten this. No problem. Instead of White Supremacism we can have Black Pride and the races remain divided with the notion that blacks MUST do everything by themselves without “white interference” or that old “white saviour narrative”.

Witness TV series Lovecraft Country. This is set in the 50s and features a Black fan of the weird writer. Lovecraft, who was undeniably racist, wrote a notorious 6 line poem “On the Creation of Niggers” whose title speaks for itself. This miserable little text wasn’t discovered till the 70s and yet it’s almost the only Lovecraft piece mentioned.

The show descends into Lovecraftian imagery where the Blacks are being trashed by the whites etc. Predictable stuff. But here’s the bit that really got me: there’s an extended seemingly interminable sequence where we get a “celebration of Black culture” with loads of jazz, blues, gospel etc. And there’s a black woman up on stage belting it out. All very glamorous…. and incredibly condescending. It seems to be saying, “Hey these black folks sure do have a good sense of [email protected]

I never made it past episode 2.