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WATCH: Meeting People is Easy – #SolutionsWatch

Previously on #SolutionsWatch James Corbett has looked at Building Community as a key part of the solution to the issues that we face . . . but how do you find that community in the first place?

On the most recent episode of the de-program James goes through just a few of the many, many, many different ways you can start finding, meeting and connecting with like-minded people in your area and around the world.

Sources, shownotes and links – as well as audio versions and download options – can be found here. Previous episodes of #SolutionsWatch can be found here and here.
Follow us on Telegram for regular updates & commentary

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siamdave
siamdave
Apr 17, 2023 11:16 AM

meet people with a purpose – getting control of *our* democracy – Democracy Study Guide https://www.rudemacedon.ca/DSG/0000-summary.html (pending)

Straight Talk
Straight Talk
Apr 17, 2023 10:49 AM

If we want to get ourselves back to the garden, we literally have to get back to the garden. The documentary, Game Changers on Netflix, shows that we are finally on our way there, no lab meat necessary. Community gardens are the best way to build connections.

Victor G.
Victor G.
Apr 17, 2023 12:17 PM
Reply to  Straight Talk

Is it available on amazon.com?

Size
Size
Apr 17, 2023 7:44 PM
Reply to  Straight Talk

Highly unlikely that any kind of truth will be found on Netflix….

denis berger
denis berger
Apr 18, 2023 5:27 PM
Reply to  Size

Actually, Netflix has been a great source of very well made documentaries that were also based on facts. Maybe not ALL, but enough of them to help educate the people on subjects that were not covered by mainstream news.

Mucho
Mucho
Apr 17, 2023 3:22 AM

These days, The Independent is just another verminous piece of shit terrorism and propaganda organisation working for the scum who are destroying the world (GOVUK). But they did used to produce some worthy journalism. This article details the horrifying results of the US and UK’s illegal, immoral, unjustified, unholy, Satanic, evil, beyond words bombing of Iraq, on behalf of the state of Israel. When you pay tax in the UK and the US, this is the kind of criminal activity you are funding:

Robert Fisk: The Children of Fallujah – the hospital of horrors | The Independent | The Independent

The pictures flash up on a screen on an upper floor of the Fallujah General Hospital. And all at once, Nadhem Shokr al-Hadidi’s administration office becomes a little chamber of horrors. A baby with a hugely deformed mouth. A child with a defect of the spinal cord, material from the spine outside the body. A baby with a terrible, vast Cyclopean eye. Another baby with only half a head, stillborn like the rest, date of birth 17 June, 2009. Yet another picture flicks onto the screen: date of birth 6 July 2009, it shows a tiny child with half a right arm, no left leg, no genitalia.

“We see this all the time now,” Al-Hadidi says, and a female doctor walks into the room and glances at the screen. She has delivered some of these still-born children. “I’ve never seen anything as bad as this in all my service,” she says quietly. Al-Hadidi takes phone calls, greets visitors to his office, offers tea and biscuits to us while this ghastly picture show unfolds on the screen. I asked to see these photographs, to ensure that the stillborn children, the deformities, were real. There’s always a reader or a viewer who will mutter the word “propaganda” under their breath.
But the photographs are a damning, ghastly reward for such doubts. January 7, 2010: a baby with faded, yellow skin and misshapen arms. April 26, 2010: a grey mass on the side of the baby’s head. A doctor beside me speaks of “Tetralogy of Fallot”, a transposition of the great blood vessels. May 3, 2010: a frog-like creature in which – the Fallujah doctor who came into the room says this – “all the abdominal organs are trying to get outside the body.”

This is too much. These photographs are too awful, the pain and emotion of them – for the poor parents, at least – impossible to contemplate. They simply cannot be published.
There is a no-nonsense attitude from the doctors in Fallujah. They know that we know about this tragedy. Indeed, there is nothing undiscovered about the child deformities of Fallujah. Other correspondents – including my colleague Patrick Cockburn – have visited Fallujah to report on them. What is so shameful is that these deformities continue unmonitored. One Fallujah doctor, an obstetrician trained in Britain – she left only five months ago – who has purchased from her own sources for her private clinic a £79,000 scanning machine for prenatal detection of congenital abnormalities, gives me her name and asks why the Ministry of Health in Baghdad will not hold a full official investigation into the deformed babies of Fallujah.

“I have been to see the ministry,” she says. “They said they would have a committee. I went to the committee. And they have done nothing. I just can’t get them to respond.” Then, 24 hours later, the same woman sends a message to a friend of mine, another Iraqi doctor, asking me not to use her name.
If the number of stillborn children of Fallujah is a disgrace, the medical staff at the Fallujah General Hospital prove their honesty by repeatedly warning of the danger of reaching conclusions too soon.

“I delivered that baby,” the obstetrician says as one more picture flashes on the screen. “I don’t think this has anything to do with American weapons. The parents were close relatives. Tribal marriages here involve a lot of families who are close by blood. But you have to remember, too, that if women have stillborn children with abnormalities at home, they will not report this to us, and the baby will be buried without any record reaching us.”
The photographs continue on the screen. January 19, 2010: a baby with tiny limbs, stillborn. A baby born on 30 October, 2010, with a cleft lip and cleft palette, still alive, a hole in the heart, a defect in its face, in need of echocardiography treatment. “A cleft lip and palate are common congenital anomalies,” Dr Samira Allani says quietly. “But it’s the increased frequency that is alarming.” Dr Allani has documented a research paper into “the increased prevalence of birth defects” in Fallujah, a study of four fathers “with two lineages of progeny”. Congenital heart defects, the paper says, reached “unprecedented numbers” in 2010.

The numbers continue to rise. Even while we are speaking, a nurse brings a message to Dr Allani. We go at once to an incubator next to the hospital delivery room. In the incubator is a little baby just 24 days old. Zeid Mohamed is almost too young to smile but he lies sleeping, his mother watching through the glass. She has given her permission for me to see her baby. His father is a security guard, the couple married three years ago. There is no family record of birth defects. But Zeid has only four fingers on each of his little hands.

Dr Allani’s computer files contain a hundred Zeids. She asks another doctor to call some parents. Will they talk to a journalist? “They want to know what happened to their children,” she says. “They deserve an answer.” She is right. But neither the Iraqi authorities, nor the Americans, nor the British – who were peripherally involved in the second battle of Fallujah and lost four men – nor any major NGO, appears willing or able to help.

When doctors can obtain funding for an investigation, they sometimes turn to organisations which clearly have their own political predetermination. Dr Allani’s paper, for example, acknowledges funding from the “Kuala Lumpur Foundation to Criminalise War” – hardly a group seeking to exonerate the use of US weaponry in Fallujah. This, too, I fear, is part of the tragedy of Fallujah.

The obstetrician who asked to be anonymous talks bleakly of the lack of equipment and training. “Chromosome defects – like Down’s Syndrome – cannot be corrected prenatally. But a foetal infection we can deal with, and we can sort out this problem by drawing a sample of blood from the baby and mother. But no laboratory here has this equipment. One blood transfer is all it needs to prevent such a condition. Of course, it will not answer our questions: why the increased miscarriages here, why the increased stillbirths, why the increased premature births?”

Dr Chris Busby, a visiting professor at the University of Ulster who has surveyed almost 5,000 people in Fallujah, agrees it is impossible to be specific about the cause of birth defects as well as cancers. “Some very major mutagenic exposure must have occurred in 2004 when the attacks happened,” he wrote two years ago. Dr Busby’s report, compiled with Malak Hamdan and Entesar Ariabi, says that infant mortality in Fallujah was found in 80 out of every 1,000 births, compared to 19 in Egypt, 17 in Jordan and only 9.7 in Kuwait.
Another of the Fallujah doctors tells me that the only UK assistance they have received comes from Dr Kypros Nicolaides, the head of Foetal Medicine at King’s College Hospital. He runs a charity, the Foetal Medicine Foundation, which has already trained one doctor from Fallujah. I call him up. He is bursting with anger.

“To me, the criminal aspect of all this – during the war – was that the British and the American governments could not go to Woolworths and buy some computers to even document the deaths in Iraq. So we have a Lancet publication that estimates 600,000 deaths in the war. Yet the occupying power did not have the decency to have a computer worth only £500 that would enable them to say “this body was brought in today and this was its name”.

Mucho
Mucho
Apr 17, 2023 3:22 AM
Reply to  Mucho

…..

Now you have an Arab country which has a higher number of deformities or cancers than Europe and you need a proper epidemiological study. I’m sure the Americans used weapons that caused these deformities. But now you have a goodness-knows-what government in Iraq and no study. It’s very easy to avoid to doing anything – except for some sympathetic crazy professor like me in London to try and achieve something.”
In al-Hadidi’s office, there are now photographs which defy words. How can you even begin to describe a dead baby with just one leg and a head four times the size of its body?

Mucho
Mucho
Apr 17, 2023 3:43 AM
Reply to  Mucho

In the build up to this evil war, GOVUK and their propagandists claimed they were going to Iraq to “liberate the Iraqi people”, in much the same way as they claimed to be “saving lives” during the scamdemic.

Mucho
Mucho
Apr 17, 2023 4:04 AM
Reply to  Mucho

Even the BBC could produce real journalism in the not so distant past:

The War Party – BBC Panorama – YouTube

Mucho
Mucho
Apr 17, 2023 4:06 AM
Reply to  Mucho

And The Guardian:

Playing skittles with Saddam | World news | The Guardian

The gameplan among Washington’s hawks has long been to reshape the Middle East along US-Israeli lines, writes Brian Whitaker

In a televised speech last week, President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt predicted devastating consequences for the Middle East if Iraq is attacked.
“We fear a state of disorder and chaos may prevail in the region,” he said. Mr Mubarak is an old-fashioned kind of Arab leader and, in the brave new post-September-11 world, he doesn’t quite get the point.

What on earth did he expect the Pentagon’s hawks to do when they heard his words of warning? Throw up their hands in dismay? – “Gee, thanks, Hosni. We never thought of that. Better call the whole thing off right away.”
They are probably still splitting their sides with laughter in the Pentagon. But Mr Mubarak and the hawks do agree on one thing: war with Iraq could spell disaster for several regimes in the Middle East. Mr Mubarak believes that would be bad. The hawks, though, believe it would be good.
For the hawks, disorder and chaos sweeping through the region would not be an unfortunate side-effect of war with Iraq, but a sign that everything is going according to plan.

In their eyes, Iraq is just the starting point – or, as a recent presentation at the Pentagon put it, “the tactical pivot” – for re-moulding the Middle East on Israeli-American lines.

This reverses the usual approach in international relations where stability is seen as the key to peace, and whether or not you like your neighbours, you have to find ways of living with them. No, say the hawks. If you don’t like the neighbours, get rid of them.

The hawks claim that President Bush has already accepted their plan and made destabilisation of “despotic regimes” a central goal of his foreign policy. They cite passages from his recent speeches as proof of this, though whether Mr Bush really knows what he has accepted is unclear. The “skittles theory” of the Middle East – that one ball aimed at Iraq can knock down several regimes – has been around for some time on the wilder fringes of politics but has come to the fore in the United States on the back of the “war against terrorism”.

Its roots can be traced, at least in part, to a paper published in 1996 by an Israeli thinktank, the Institute for Advanced Strategic and Political Studies. Entitled “A clean break: a new strategy for securing the realm”, it was intended as a political blueprint for the incoming government of Binyamin Netanyahu. As the title indicates, it advised the right-wing Mr Netanyahu to make a complete break with the past by adopting a strategy “based on an entirely new intellectual foundation, one that restores strategic initiative and provides the nation the room to engage every possible energy on rebuilding Zionism …”

Among other things, it suggested that the recently-signed Oslo accords might be dispensed with – “Israel has no obligations under the Oslo agreements if the PLO does not fulfil its obligations” – and that “alternatives to [Yasser] Arafat’s base of power” could be cultivated. “Jordan has ideas on this,” it added.

It also urged Israel to abandon any thought of trading land for peace with the Arabs, which it described as “cultural, economic, political, diplomatic, and military retreat”.

“Our claim to the land – to which we have clung for hope for 2,000 years – is legitimate and noble,” it continued. “Only the unconditional acceptance by Arabs of our rights, especially in their territorial dimension, ‘peace for peace’, is a solid basis for the future.”

The paper set out a plan by which Israel would “shape its strategic environment”, beginning with the removal of Saddam Hussein and the installation of a Hashemite monarchy in Baghdad.

With Saddam out of the way and Iraq thus brought under Jordanian Hashemite influence, Jordan and Turkey would form an axis along with Israel to weaken and “roll back” Syria. Jordan, it suggested, could also sort out Lebanon by “weaning” the Shia Muslim population away from Syria and Iran, and re-establishing their former ties with the Shia in the new Hashemite kingdom of Iraq. “Israel will not only contain its foes; it will transcend them”, the paper concluded.

To succeed, the paper stressed, Israel would have to win broad American support for these new policies – and it advised Mr Netanyahu to formulate them “in language familiar to the Americans by tapping into themes of American administrations during the cold war which apply well to Israel”.
At first glance, there’s not much to distinguish the 1996 “Clean Break” paper from the outpourings of other right-wing and ultra-Zionist thinktanks … except for the names of its authors.

The leader of the “prominent opinion makers” who wrote it was Richard Perle – now chairman of the Defence Policy Board at the Pentagon.
Also among the eight-person team was Douglas Feith, a neo-conservative lawyer, who now holds one of the top four posts at the Pentagon as under-secretary of policy.

Mr Feith has objected to most of the peace deals made by Israel over the years, and views the Middle East in the same good-versus-evil terms that he previously viewed the cold war. He regarded the Oslo peace process as nothing more than a unilateral withdrawal which “raises life-and-death issues for the Jewish state”.
Two other opinion-makers in the team were David Wurmser and his wife, Meyrav (see US thinktanks give lessons in foreign policy, August 19). Mrs Wurmser was co-founder of Memri, a Washington-based charity that distributes articles translated from Arabic newspapers portraying Arabs in a bad light. After working with Mr Perle at the American Enterprise Institute, David Wurmser is now at the State Department, as a special assistant to John Bolton, the und
er-secretary for arms control and international security.
A fifth member of the team was James Colbert, of the Washington-based Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs (Jinsa) – a bastion of neo-conservative hawkery whose advisory board was previously graced by Dick Cheney (now US vice-president), John Bolton and Douglas Feith.
One of Jinsa’s stated aims is “to inform the American defence and foreign affairs community about the important role Israel can and does play in bolstering democratic interests in the Mediterranean and the Middle East”. In practice, a lot of its effort goes into sending retired American military brass on jaunts to Israel – after which many of them write suitably hawkish newspaper articles or letters to the editor.

Jinsa’s activities are examined in detail by Jason Vest in the September 2 issue of The Nation. The article notes some interesting business relationships between retired US military officers on Jinsa’s board and American companies supplying weapons to Israel.

With several of the “Clean Break” paper’s authors now holding key positions in Washington, the plan for Israel to “transcend” its foes by reshaping the Middle East looks a good deal more achievable today than it did in 1996. Americans may even be persuaded to give up their lives to achieve it.

The six-year-old plan for Israel’s “strategic environment” remains more or less intact, though two extra skittles – Saudi Arabia and Iran – have joined Iraq, Syria and Lebanon on the hit list.
Whatever members of the Iraqi opposition may think, the plan to replace Saddam Hussein with a Hashemite monarch – descendants of the Prophet Muhammad who rule Jordan – is also very much alive. Evidence of this was strengthened by the surprise arrival of Prince Hassan, former heir to the Jordanian throne, at a meeting of exiled Iraqi officers in London last July.

Balkydj
Balkydj
Apr 17, 2023 9:18 AM
Reply to  Mucho

The initial act is just traumatising… it is the horrific Legacy of Genocide & Chemical Weaponry that is the most painfully shocking element to witness & most angering !
Twice certainly suffices in my case, to understand better…

R.i.P. Robert Fisk & long live Dilyana Gaytandzhieva – Amen

Poignant comments, Mucho. How people at ANY level of ANY so called society can be so
Fucking Dumb Dumb & Dumbed down over D.U.M.D.U.M. Depleted Uranium Munitions
Haunts me daily… i even wonder if this comment will be published.

mgeo
mgeo
Apr 17, 2023 5:29 AM
Reply to  Mucho

Agent Orange has not finished its work in Indo-China. That is apart from the vast number of remaining unexploded ordnances.

Howard
Howard
Apr 17, 2023 3:42 PM
Reply to  Mucho

The psychos whose monstrous disregard for life caused this tragedy get a free pass no matter which way the dice roll.

If there’s no God, they’ll never face any kind of retribution. If there is a God, they’ll never face any kind of retribution either. A God that would sit back and watch something like this unfold would reward the psychos for a job well done.

And what of the God groupies? Would they simply say it’s all part of God’s plan, and we just have to trust God’s immense benevolence and love for His creations?

Well, if something like this represents God’s love, maybe it’s time to start praying to Satan.

Paul Watson
Paul Watson
Apr 16, 2023 7:46 PM

Join a Charismatic church..
Not only will you be able to network with a great bunch of people but collectively resist the satanic influence currently infecting the majority of people on the planet. (Certainly in the West)

Thomas Frey
Thomas Frey
Apr 16, 2023 7:53 PM
Reply to  Paul Watson

What does “Charismatic” mean in this context?

ThinkTwice
ThinkTwice
Apr 16, 2023 8:05 PM
Reply to  Thomas Frey

Good question!

Paul Watson
Paul Watson
Apr 16, 2023 9:49 PM
Reply to  Thomas Frey

Join a Charismatic church and find out…

rubberheid
rubberheid
Apr 17, 2023 10:44 PM
Reply to  Paul Watson

denied, I’ll stick with Job and the Gospels…

away with yon alleged charisma of whom?

Allie GoPro
Allie GoPro
Apr 16, 2023 10:03 PM
Reply to  Thomas Frey

Mormons

jubal hershaw
jubal hershaw
Apr 18, 2023 6:33 AM
Reply to  Thomas Frey

Charismatic Jim Jones & The Peoples Temple.
All Frieinds until Death Do Us Part.
Grokking with friends, what a way to go !

Johnny
Johnny
Apr 18, 2023 7:17 AM
Reply to  Thomas Frey

Big personalities (persona = mask) singing and that old chestnut, tithing (give us money or God’ll get you).

Jen
Jen
Apr 17, 2023 1:47 AM
Reply to  Paul Watson

“.. Not only will you be able to network with a great bunch of people but collectively resist the satanic influence currently infecting the majority of people on the planet …”

Great, exchange one form of Satanism for another form.

Seeing people “speaking in tongues” at a charismatic church is no different from seeing people babbling and claiming to be possessed by spirits at a seance.

siamdave
siamdave
Apr 17, 2023 12:55 PM
Reply to  Jen

or running around saying idiotic things like ‘get the jab it will save you!!’ ‘Masks save you and me both!!!’ etc etc don’t want to cause too much vomiting …

Clive Williams
Clive Williams
Apr 18, 2023 12:56 AM
Reply to  Paul Watson

Nomadic your obviously not. There’s been no west since eighties digital marketing right left of one’s own invested interests in globalisation.

Mann Friedmann
Mann Friedmann
Apr 18, 2023 9:12 PM
Reply to  Paul Watson

Just give me truth without the song and dance.
Commuinity is just a critical mass of citizens that have similar values, independent of religion.

Don’t look for the limited hangout.

Andre
Andre
Apr 16, 2023 6:54 PM

Consider also Solaris: an “Internet of Humans”. A network of mutual aid and solidarity, which starts in your neighbourhood.
It started in France in September 2021. http://solaris-ontario.org/ is a comprehensive website in English.
There is absolutely no collection of personal information on this website. Collection of personal data exists only at the local level and does not circulate.

denis berger
denis berger
Apr 18, 2023 9:01 PM
Reply to  Andre

Thank you Andre, I knew nothing about it. It is a great idea. Saddly, there is also attempts to destroy the concept, by vile people who have no idea of what is coming to them. https://lundi.am/Reseau-Solaris-faux-dissidents-vrais-ecofascistes

Andre
Andre
Apr 18, 2023 10:27 PM
Reply to  denis berger

Thank you for your comment Denis. Also for the link though you will forgive me for not reading the entire smear article. The two videos on this page (with English subtitles) provides a better idea of what Solaris is about.

The following link from Solaris-France lists countries where the network has expanded: https://solaris-france.org/2021/10/14/solaris-par-pays/
If you don’t find a coordination cell where you are, I encourage you to start one !