135

Blinded by the Next Great Thing

Todd Hayen

I must be missing a chip in my brain or something. Why have I never been blown away by the advances in technology that attempt to replace humans? I mean, I am fascinated by the next great robot vacuum cleaner, or a car that will pick you up after you’ve had your fine cricket dinner at the Four Seasons, but my fascination dissipates quickly.

Cell phones, computers, and crap like that are interesting….but when I hear about AI art, robots, or synthesized orchestras, my blood runs cold.

This seems to have always been true for me, even back in 1961 when the IBM 7094 sang “Daisy” in its eerie electronic voice, I wasn’t too pleased—and I was six years old! (Although I didn’t read about it until I was about 11.)

I felt this sort of sting personally when I witnessed the takeover of robot-music-making-machines in the ‘80s and ‘90s in Hollywood. This appropriation caused a lot of lost jobs, but more importantly (to me) it was the beginning of the loss of soul in film music (my then profession). Sure, there are times where an electronic score is appropriate, but what I am talking about is replacing a symphonic score with an artificially produced sampled score. (Ironically, the desire for full orchestral scores played by living human musicians is still quite strong in Hollywood big budget A list movies, but much of television and cable has gone the cyborg route.)

Going back to a more practical perspective, people have this strange love affair for technology and will literally embrace the very thing that eventually takes away their livelihood, or ultimately turns them into cyborgs. (Read Kurt Vonnegut’s wonderful book Player Piano for a fun romp in dystopia.) We, as a culture, also seem to believe that technology will eventually save us from all suffering, hard work, and even death.

Hey folks, I’ve got news for you, if technology hasn’t relieved us from the suffering of cancer, there is something whacked going on here as the mechanism of cancer doesn’t seem as complicated as the mechanism of an mRNA vaccine. At worse, there is something sinister about what technology is “allowed” to do for us, and what is strictly verboten.

Why do we keep doing this? Why are humans so enamored with all this highfalutin gadgetry and gimmicks? I think it is in our nature. We are compelled to make things happen in the most efficient and effective manner. Call it lazy, as humans do not want to expend one speck more energy than they have to. They would succumb to a life of laying in bed all day while all the robots and machines did everything for them if given the option. It is only in play that humans want to exert effort. And work isn’t play. Still, even in play we tend to look toward technology to relieve us from too much physical effort and inconvenience. Look at video gaming and virtual reality technology. Even art is something we would rather have a machine do (unless you are an artist.)

And I know we have gotten to a point where we expect medicine to eventually spare us of all pain and suffering, and even death. No one seems to want to live life as God intended—to eventually succumb to the nature of our physical bodies, which does have a certain predetermined shelf life.

Ironically, living as a human as “God intended” when we were first put on this planet was of a rather short duration but probably not as difficult as it is now. Most diseases we acquired through animals due to our rather “unnatural” way of cultivating them as food sources. We may have had a higher likelihood of being brutally devoured by wild beasts, but that was probably not only quick and relatively painless, but somewhat infrequent. In the ensuing years we humans made this world insanely toxic and put ourselves in serious harm’s way.

But forget God, as most people seem to be doing. At the very least, forget God’s intentions. We want to “be God” ourselves, and harness all the power that we once were fine to allow God to have for Himself. Sure, even with God at the helm we will suffer, we will grieve over our parent’s death, our friends and partner’s deaths, suffer strange natural ailments like poison ivy and army ant ravages. Natural disasters would still break our idyllic existence. And when our time comes, we will die.

Screw that. We want to live forever…or at least our masters do. We want poison ivy eliminated, and we want to conquer those army ants.

I guess if things go as planned, most of us will not be able to afford the magic techno-chip or nano particle that will keep us alive forever. And we can’t rent the thing, unless of course we are slaves and pay our monthly rental charge with our sweat, blood, and tears.

So, the more excited we get about technology, the more likely we are ushering in our own demise. Really? Isn’t that what the movie Terminator is all about? We have seen this for years with regard to electronics replacing jobs. Now we will see it in other ways that are more foreboding.

As fun as advances in technology are to most people, the less excited we get about it the better off we probably will be. Advanced technology with many things really isn’t that threatening, but it is difficult to find anything these days where such a progression is entirely benign. Maybe a fancy TV or fancy refrigerator has no evil attribute to it, but an advancement in, say, phone technology just makes it that much easier to get obsessed with the phone. The easiest solution to all of this is to be conscious, and regulate, and engage ourselves in the things that technology has lured us away from, like communing with nature, family, and friends.

As far as medicine is concerned, just be aware of what you might be “selling out” to. Be aware of the dangers of things like digital ID implants and what their downside might be, of vaccines and what their downside might be, etc. Be aware of medical advancement’s side effects, if any, and whether a procedure is really worth doing. It is unfortunate that the most invasive results of technological advancements really are not something that the average person will wish to resolve. The only resolution is just to not engage in it at all.

Most people don’t want to return to the Stone Age with regard to medicine, and I certainly would be one of them. So regarding medical technology, we are pretty stuck. I know there are some people who have already given up on modern medicine, so it certainly is possible.

So good luck out there, and in the words of Scarlett O’Hara of Gone With the Wind, “After all, tomorrow is another day.” Maybe then we’ll figure something out.

Todd Hayen is a registered psychotherapist practicing in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. He holds a PhD in depth psychotherapy and an MA in Consciousness Studies. He specializes in Jungian, archetypal, psychology. Todd also writes for his own substack, which you can read here

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MileBar
MileBar
May 31, 2023 11:34 AM

Their great thing, Great Reset?
Klaus Schwab, WEF, the so-called world elite and most governments, that belongs to it (nothing can deform/ make a person more insane/ monstrous than wealth and power), who would like to redesign the whole world according to their inhuman and monstrous ideas (persons, who have no control over themselves and their own morbid fantasies) behave like the most severely mentally ill children who sit up to their necks in feces, play with feces and find it fragrant, very funny, beautiful and useful.

SeverelyRegarded
SeverelyRegarded
May 29, 2023 8:36 AM

Some people believe that the invention of the computer was more significant than that of fire, or of the printing press. They believe that it was the most important thing to happen since biological processes began.

NickM
NickM
May 29, 2023 4:02 PM

I think it is the other way around: confirmation of Schroedinger’s hypothesis — that life is governed by molecular code — is the greatest biological discovery since Goethe’s theory of evolution of plants from a common ancestral Ur-pflant, and of human apes from a common ancestral Ur-apf.

Speedwellian
Speedwellian
May 28, 2023 2:32 AM

God I loved that book. Just look at the piles of electronic waste around you, the dead lap tops, phones, T.V’s etc. Look how quickly the new fangled thing becomes unslick and clunky. Things get old quick. And that is the answer, that is the future. When I look at the shinny promised future, I see old broken junk, it has no pull beyond practical use, I have as much love for it as a screwdriver, I do love a good screwdriver, Tech will consume the week and displace the useless, when the plug gets pulled, that’s when you will find out who you really are.

correspondencecommitttee
correspondencecommitttee
May 28, 2023 12:34 AM

There’s nothing natural about human nature unless it’s (re)created through our second nature of human culture, attesting to flexibility more than fixity to who we are by becoming.  

For the greater part of human evolution our kind have lived in social conditions closer to those of the Stone Age than the machinery of (re)production developed over the last couple of centuries. Perhaps we’re in peril in large part due to carrying on with Stone Age consciousness of a world which has been overtaken by abstract systems of social engineering that don’t alarm us with the same sense of threat as what comes at us more tangibly in our immediate environment. How else to account for the curious (mis)perception that the technological ensemble is for our convenience rather than control?  

If Stone Age economics approximated an original affluent society (Marshall Sahlins), how much of this might have been due to the kind of healthy autonomy enjoyed by living beings free of the fulsome progress imposed by the mythology of the machine? Industrial capitalism’s logic leads us now into biodigital slavery and biological extermination. We need to fight for a kind of ‘human nature’ that remains of our own making.

Fyi: Clip of Christine Anderson, courtesy of Patrick Wood:
Essay on Resistance and Rebelling

boxofcrayons
boxofcrayons
May 28, 2023 3:05 AM

What worthless shapes we ape. Fulfilling their desires, living to their time, bequeathing life to the parasite, but satisfiedt, with it’s captivations and accompanying purgatory.

Veri Tas
Veri Tas
May 27, 2023 11:57 PM

Our human malaise is the disconnect with self, our true self, not our mirror reflection, and the primordial energy with which we and everything in the universe is imbued.

We’ve given away our enormous power having been hypnotised by those with malicious intent. We’ve been conditioned to look outside of ourselves for quick fixes that others in our manifest (holographic?) world will do for us. That’s why we are fascinated with shiny things to acquire and play with until the next new thing. That’s why general health is in decline – too many quick-fix wonder solutions for every little problem making things worse, as is quite evident from figures showing the majority is hopelessly, chronically sick. That’s why we are glued to our TV where shallow lies hijack our attention from one catastrophe to the next.

Joe
Joe
May 28, 2023 5:22 AM
Reply to  Veri Tas

Nobody ‘gives away’ their power. They have it stolen from them. First comes the 18 year youth indoctrination where you are literally considered property of your parents. Then you are spit out into a world in which you must earn money (often through miserable wage labor) to avoid the waking nightmare of being homeless. The global anti-capitalist movement was fucking pounded into the sand in the 20th and 21st centuries, so good luck finding anyone that you can organize with to make things better.

Nobody is making a choice to live in this world.

Veri Tas
Veri Tas
May 29, 2023 12:32 AM
Reply to  Joe

There is always choice.

Howard
Howard
May 27, 2023 11:54 PM

Every day I rejoice a little bit more at being a Luddite – and proud of it. Should someone ask if that means I have forsaken even indoor plumbing and “go” in the woods, I would answer without hesitation “No, it doesn’t mean that.”

Like everyone else today, I am inured in the technological age and could not survive without some of it. Nor do I seek to deprive anyone else of it. I just happen to recognize that technology has no good side. It’s all a “bad side.” But it’s become necessary – and that, more than anything else, is my proof that it’s bad for us.

We simply cannot live without it once we get caught up in it. The same with money: no longer merely a medium of exchange, money has become the single most essential element of human survival, even more than food, clothing and shelter.

Technology has made HOW we get our food, clothing and shelter more important than WHAT we eat, wear and live in. It’s ass backwards – and that can’t be good.

Joe
Joe
May 28, 2023 5:25 AM
Reply to  Howard

Technology isn’t itself bad. The genocided indigenous used simple technologies like tools and shelters. The problem is that the technologies of this world are specifically designed for enslavement and destruction, and are designed in a way that creates massive demand for further ecological rape.

Fast Eddy
Fast Eddy
May 27, 2023 10:21 PM

Try solving a Captcha for the limits to AI…

As for intelligence… we rejoice and celebrate engineers, inventors, scientists… but look where our great ‘intelligence’ has delivered us…

We feed 8 billion people — using substances that are finite (oil and gas are the feedstock for fertilizers and pesticides — and they drive the industrial farming complex)… with no alternative.

And now these inputs are in very deep depletion.

Seems to me ‘intelligence’ is more of a burden … one might even suggest that it is stupidity.

I ask my dog why he doesn’t drive a car — if he could speak he’d say — why would I want to do that?

Shale binge has spoiled US reserves, top investor warns Financial Times.
 
Preface. Conventional crude oil production may have already peaked in 2008 at 69.5 million barrels per day (mb/d) according to Europe’s International Energy Agency (IEA 2018 p45). The U.S. Energy Information Agency shows global peak crude oil production at a later date in 2018 at 82.9 mb/d (EIA 2020) because they included tight oil, oil sands, and deep-sea oil.   Though it will take several years of lower oil production to be sure the peak occurred. Regardless, world production has been on a plateau since 2005.
 
 
What’s saved the world from oil decline was unconventional tight “fracked” oil, which accounted for 63% of total U.S. crude oil production in 2019 and 83% of global oil growth from 2009 to 2019. So it’s a big deal if we’ve reached the peak of fracked oil, because that is also the peak of both conventional and unconventional oil and the decline of all oil in the future.
 
Some key points from this Financial Times article: https://energyskeptic.com/2021/the-end-of-fracked-shale-oil/

KiwiJoker
KiwiJoker
May 27, 2023 11:17 PM
Reply to  Fast Eddy

Oil is abiotic.

Fast Eddy
Fast Eddy
May 27, 2023 11:40 PM
Reply to  KiwiJoker

I am amazed that every time I post the comment about deep depletion … someone rushes in and insists oil is abiotic!!!

Do you a google alert set that lets you know when to post this rebuttal?

Generally I will respond with – if there is so much oil left (cuz little me in the centre of the Earth are churning out more all the time) them why are we steaming oil out of sand, drilling miles beneath the oceans — and fracking to suck up the dregs?

I never get a response. That’s because there is no viable response. So the trolls move on

Sam - Admin2
Admin
Sam - Admin2
May 28, 2023 4:50 AM
Reply to  Fast Eddy

Well surely it can be abiotic and depleteable, depending on how fast we consume it? Which is different to the high jeopardy ‘when it’s gone it’s gone’ argument so beloved by apocalypse propaganda, but presumably no less severe for us if it’s depleted, since we’re discussing a replenishing process on a geological timescale. However, if there’s any merit to the abiotic idea, presumably it might be more abundant than first thought? The earth’s crust is hugely thick and we’re limited to scratching only the very surface. I wish I could see the theory fairly tested rather than pooh-poohed, that always makes me rather suspicious lol A2

Fast Eddy
Fast Eddy
May 28, 2023 6:08 AM
Reply to  Sam - Admin2

According to Rystad, the current resource replacement ratio for conventional resources is only 16 percent. Only 1 barrel out of every 6 consumed is being replaced with new resources


https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/The-Biggest-Oil-Gas-Discoveries-Of-2019.html

Fast Eddy
Fast Eddy
May 28, 2023 6:11 AM
Reply to  Sam - Admin2

Do you mind pointing me to the page where they indicate their fields are refilling.

https://corporate.exxonmobil.com/Investors/2021-Annual-Report

Sam - Admin2
Admin
Sam - Admin2
May 28, 2023 6:59 AM
Reply to  Fast Eddy

Cheap theatrics linking to this. Plus you already gave a link demonstrating refilling. And why would I trust Exxon Mobil anyway, when share prices are linked to oil prices which are linked to scarcity?

I meant it would be nice to have an indie, unbiased scientific review of abiotic oil. Unfortunately I doubt that’ll ever happen.

Not bothered with this aggro tbh. I’m just curious and making conversation.

Fast Eddy
Fast Eddy
May 28, 2023 11:02 AM
Reply to  Sam - Admin2

Come on man.

Surely Exxon would be very keen to promote their refilling fields — that drives their share price higher.

Particularly in light of comment image

If Apple tripled its sales in China ya think it would not be in the annual report.

We are running low on affordable energy.

That is causing relentless inflation and it will collapse the global economy

But before that happens – we will be exterminated

Sam - Admin2
Admin
Sam - Admin2
May 28, 2023 12:19 PM
Reply to  Fast Eddy

I don’t know if I really trust these bar graphs. They remind me covid graphs comparing 2020 crude all-cause mortality to the Spanish flu. ‘Discoveries’ don’t equate to scarcity, necessarily, btw. Hypothetically, if existing fields were all spontaneously refilling like cups of plenty, new ‘discoveries’ might be zero.

Can I put on a belaboured expression and just say for the record, I am not saying this is the case. I am not saying abiotic oil is necessarily a thing. I am just curious.

You however, seem to be taking the oil industry at face value, which is worrying. Do you remember Energy scarcity is central to the green globalist agenda? This climate of scarcity was reinforced during Covid. This climate of scarcity is being reinforced now by the SMO and Nord Stream sabotage, even as Russia are still pumping crude to Ukraine and Ukraine is processing it and selling it on.

Pushing up prices, economic and climate alarmism, threats of war and rationing… all great things if you want to propagandise and misdirect the proles.

A2

T.S.
T.S.
May 28, 2023 2:01 PM
Reply to  Sam - Admin2

The Nord Stream Sabotage that is not proven ? That is just another propaganda lie, like all the Co(n)vid lies, the climate lies… The method is always the same: find enough doofuses who run around panicked like chicken little and cry “the sky is falling” and then present them with your solution to end all problems, which really does not solve anything but just gives the one offering it just more control.

Sam - Admin2
Admin
Sam - Admin2
May 28, 2023 2:33 PM
Reply to  T.S.

It’s certainly fully incorporated into the narrative I touched on above, whether real or not.

Fast Eddy
Fast Eddy
May 28, 2023 11:52 PM
Reply to  Sam - Admin2

If you don’t trust the graphs then let’s just apply common sense:

  1. We know the US peaked on conventional oil in the 70’s.
  2. We know that many other large oil plays have peaked including Alaska, North Sea etc….they are not refilling.
  3. We know that we are drilling miles beneath the oceans, steaming oil out of sand and fracking then sucking up the dregs — all extremely troublesome and expensive ways to extract oil.
  4. We have zero evidence that indicates oil reservoirs refill. New oil is happening – but it takes millions of years to happen.
  5. We know that high priced energy causes raging inflation – we are seeing it now. What would be the purpose of forcing energy prices higher? If this does not stop the global economy will collapse.

Yet you don’t trust the graphs — you trust some obscure website that claims oil is abiotic and we are awash in oceans of oil — but for some reason the oil companies do not want us to be aware of that.

That makes zero sense.

But hey – I get it — if you acknowledge that we are running short on affordable energy — then that would lead to despair.

The PR Team knows this — that is why they have run the massive campaign promoting ‘renewable’ energy. And EV’s.

If you ask someone – do you think we will ever run out of oil?

Most will say – of course we will — it’s a finite resource

Are you concerned?

Nope.

Why not?

Cuz we are transitioning to renewables and EVs.

You are being played.

Sam - Admin2
Admin
Sam - Admin2
May 29, 2023 12:11 AM
Reply to  Fast Eddy

I think abiotic oil is the only explanation.

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
Jun 1, 2023 11:27 AM
Reply to  Fast Eddy

The inner heart of the earth is burning lava constantly producing gas, coal and oil.
Its a self correcting system.
If you take one apple from a tree, two apples will pop out the next year on the same place.
If you put one potato into the soil, 6+ comes out.

Try to put all your papers and flat screen away, and go outside and look.

Fast Eddy
Fast Eddy
Jun 1, 2023 10:15 PM
Reply to  Erik Nielsen

And the evidence for this is?

I will ask again – if the Earth is producing more oil then why are we steaming oil out of sand… drilling miles beneath the sea for it … and why are we fracking and sucking up the dregs.

Oil Discoveries are at record lows comment image
 
According to Rystad, the current resource replacement ratio for conventional resources is only 16 percent. Only 1 barrel out of every 6 consumed is being replaced with new resources
https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/The-Biggest-Oil-Gas-Discoveries-Of-2019.html

Sam - Admin2
Admin
Sam - Admin2
Jun 2, 2023 12:34 AM
Reply to  Fast Eddy

Abiotic oil principle has far reaching implications, and the science behind fossil fuels is troublesome. Your argument that oil can’t be generated by the earth because of how fast we consume it is actually irrelevant. Try to have an open mind and understand the point being made.

Fast Eddy
Fast Eddy
Jun 1, 2023 10:16 PM
Reply to  Erik Nielsen

If you actually believe that then surely you believe the Booster Shots are Safe and Effective… right?

thinking-turtle
thinking-turtle
May 28, 2023 9:19 AM
Reply to  Sam - Admin2

Well surely it can be abiotic and depleteable, depending on how fast we consume it?

This would explain the push for sustainability at a lower level of oil consumption.

Fast Eddy
Fast Eddy
Jun 2, 2023 1:18 AM

We are nearly out of affordable oil.

That’s why we are steaming oil out of sand on a massive scale.

Here – have a look

http://www.wilderutopia.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Steam-and-Smoke-in-Alberta-Tar-Sands-Alex-MacLean.png

It’s also why we frack oil sucking up the dregs.

Shale binge has spoiled US reserves, top investor warns Financial Times.
 
Preface. Conventional crude oil production may have already peaked in 2008 at 69.5 million barrels per day (mb/d) according to Europe’s International Energy Agency (IEA 2018 p45). The U.S. Energy Information Agency shows global peak crude oil production at a later date in 2018 at 82.9 mb/d (EIA 2020) because they included tight oil, oil sands, and deep-sea oil.   Though it will take several years of lower oil production to be sure the peak occurred. Regardless, world production has been on a plateau since 2005.
 
 
What’s saved the world from oil decline was unconventional tight “fracked” oil, which accounted for 63% of total U.S. crude oil production in 2019 and 83% of global oil growth from 2009 to 2019. So it’s a big deal if we’ve reached the peak of fracked oil, because that is also the peak of both conventional and unconventional oil and the decline of all oil in the future.
 
Some key points from this Financial Times article: https://energyskeptic.com/2021/the-end-of-fracked-shale-oil/

And this is why we are being EXTERMINATED.

The global economy runs on cheap energy.

Cheap energy is not infinite.

We cannot wait millions of years for new oil to be created.

There is zero evidence to support what you are suggesting. Zero.

You are being played by some ridiculous website.

Why don’t you just suggest the moon has an ocean of oil beneath the surface and all we need to do is run a pipeline to the moon?

Fast Eddy
Fast Eddy
Jun 2, 2023 1:21 AM

Check it out!!! Lots of oil … unfortunately we cannot even get to the moon due to the Van Allen Belts… but some day we will figure that out… and we’ll have all the oil we ever need (till that runs out)

Saturn’s orange moon Titan has hundreds of times more liquid hydrocarbons than all the known oil and natural gas reserves on Earth, according to new data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft. The hydrocarbons rain from the sky, collecting in vast deposits that form lakes and dunes.

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/cassini/media/cassini-20080213.html

Joe
Joe
May 28, 2023 5:26 AM
Reply to  Fast Eddy

All of creation is alive.

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
Jun 1, 2023 11:17 AM
Reply to  Fast Eddy

Its the economy, always! Fracking is cheaper.
It takes time and equipment to exploit new or old oil fields. So now pls dont say you never got a response.

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
Jun 1, 2023 11:14 AM
Reply to  KiwiJoker

Thanks Kiwijoker. Its really that simple. 3 words rather than 27 international meetings, 1000’s of books, discussions with leftists..

maria
maria
May 27, 2023 8:18 PM

“I think it is in our nature …”
‘Our’??

No, Todd, it’s “western” programming.

“Humans so enamored with all this highfalutin gadgetry and gimmicks?”

Who then? Some of the kids are just playing with their new toys. They don’t believe in them particularly. Will drop them instantly when something less crap is offered.

We don’t all watch TV.

Not to be overlooked that a great many people on this planet are still impoverished and living quite remote from glam tech. (Still no schools, water wells, etc. around).
False perception from the false perception of affluence.

Back to earth.
There are people here who have never heard of London.
Yes, really.
Many people the world over also don’t understand a word of English.
So they miss all the brain-washing.
Yes, really.

Re-member:
There is no “west”.
I might well ask:
West of what???
The sun?

What’s your reference point?
Your co-ordinates?

Who exactly is under the spell?
I’m not.

Thomas L Frey
Thomas L Frey
May 27, 2023 11:07 PM
Reply to  maria

The Meek that shall inherit the earth?

Todd Hayen
Todd Hayen
May 27, 2023 11:33 PM
Reply to  maria

Good for you.

el Gallinazo
el Gallinazo
May 27, 2023 7:12 PM

I upgraded last month from an iPhone 8 to a ZTE dumb flip phone. I would have preferred to upgrade to an ATT “princess” and an answering machine, but landlines are not available in my rural Mexican town. Since 99% of “smart”phones are either Android or iOS, maybe the intelligence agencies won’t bother snooping with this odd OS. BTW, I recommend the ZTE flip dumbphone strongly. Very solidly built, settings are well laid out, and its pdf manual is clear and precise. And cost me USD70. Of course if you are addicted to texting and think the proper way to spell “you” is “u,” it is not for u. And unlike the iPhone 8 and “up,” it has a standard acoustic jack and doesn’t require an awkward dongle. But I am sure that the 9 to 1 right/left ratio of temporal brain cancer to human handedness correlation is an utter coincidence.

Howard
Howard
May 27, 2023 10:27 PM
Reply to  el Gallinazo

Landlines are becoming scarce everywhere. Even scarcer is finding a telecom to connect a landline to. A few years back, Verizon ended DSL (I never did know what the letters meant). I lost my landline hook-up and my internet hook-up (yes, DSL internet was slow as old Moses; but I liked it).

Now my “landline” is digital. And I’m sure it wouldn’t surprise you if I told you I have a lot more problems now than I ever did with DSL.

el Gallinazo
el Gallinazo
May 27, 2023 10:51 PM
Reply to  Howard

When I bought my lot 7 years ago, it had a telephone pole stuck in the middle of it though no electric lines. But I was ready to go off grid anyway. But when I went to sign up with TelMex, I was told that they didn’t offer land lines in my pueblo, which is quite small. I said, how is that possible as I have one of your telephone poles in the middle of my property? I was told that runs some lines to the larger town to the north, which is the last one before the mountains, but no connections for you. So not only did I miss out on my beloved analog voice line, but no internet as well. As my original post might indicate, I hate cell phones, particularly so-called smartphones. I always knew they were bioweapons, poisoning us and spying on us. Actually I hate anything starting with the word smart except “smart aleck.’ I guess that is illegal now, a hate crime. Fortunately some entrepreneur in my town set up an internet relay with a clientele of about a dozen customers, sending out a mw signal, as the Frenchman said in Monty Python, in my general direction, and it works pretty well except when it got fried by a lightning bolt. I have a 20 foot 1 inch galvanized plumbing pipe sticking out of my roof with a little antenna on top of it.

thinking-turtle
thinking-turtle
May 28, 2023 9:13 AM
Reply to  Howard

DSL means Digital Subscriber Line. Your land line is probably still DSL. I know of no other technology that delivers internet over a copper telephony cable.

In the past, DSL was often combined with plain old telephony. That part is being phased out, and “plain old telephony” is changed to “voice over IP” and delivered on top of the DSL line, instead of in addition to it.

Each new generation of fixed line internet, telephony or TV is worse than the old one. It’s a form of technological regression.

Martin Usher
Martin Usher
May 27, 2023 6:30 PM

Replacing humans with humanoid robots will never catch on because the wetware is always more cost effective — its self-reproducing, self-repairing, self-training and generally self-contained. That doesn’t mean that people won’t make increasingly sophisticated replicants of humans but unless they share the cost effecitveness of the real thing they’ll just be a toy, designed to impress or intimidate but not a practical alternative to us.

Realistically the machines don’t need a humanoid form. Like other masters throughout history they’ve got us if they need us, all they have to do is select the ones they want and train them. Like every other activity machines do its replicates what we’ve always done; they machines just give their users more power and reach (so a fiefdom isn’t just a few acres of land around your castle, its the whole planet — assuming you could get away with it).

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
May 27, 2023 8:11 PM
Reply to  Martin Usher

I checked this wetware: A wetware computer is an organic computer (which can also be known as an artificial organic brain or a neurocomputer) composed of organic material “wetware” such as “living” neurons.

So your wetware is still a computer who are more cost effective than a computer that will never catch on. Ok. I believe you are an IT freak yes?

eman
eman
May 27, 2023 9:35 PM
Reply to  Martin Usher

AI controlled machines should not by law be permitted o appear in the nude in public.

Thomas L Frey
Thomas L Frey
May 27, 2023 11:08 PM
Reply to  eman

LOL!

Thomas L Frey
Thomas L Frey
May 27, 2023 11:09 PM
Reply to  Martin Usher

I wouldn’t assume that the goal is to replace humans with robots.
I think it is to turn humans into non-humans as a means of capturing souls. Trapping the souls on this hellish world.

sandy
sandy
May 27, 2023 6:21 PM

Marshall McLuhan points out that just as the printed book hyper empowered writer and reader, each technological advance since presents to the user superpowers that are irresistible. “Progress” is irresistible until the negative side effects become known as worse than the advantages. Which is what we face now. The downsides of the mass produced, identical publication, is stifling uniformity of thought spread like a virus, and the unverified intent of the author who may have selfish veiled agendas. Before books were printed they were each handmade and personally individualized in appearance and content, meaning subtle differences in every book and non-uniformity of thought. As technology has evolved after computer, advances are virtual and unlimited, consented to and/or implemented without consent as is now the case. The downsides of virtuality and policed non-consent in 2023 are obvious. We are being herded into corrals of austerity in every phase of life while the virtual creations that are to be our overlords are given access to unlimited resources. Just as the 1% creators of this 21st C agenda have stolen the resources. We have the right to say no. We have the right to determine how, why and what human tools are developed, or to constrain them.

As McLuhan asks, if the purpose of technology, progress, is to provide for the social needs of Humanity and does the opposite, should we not require this of technology before advancing it? Obviously in the 21st C. But then the snake oil salesmen couldn’t sell us our vanity, our narcissism-to-empowerment, to entrap us.

eman
eman
May 27, 2023 9:43 PM
Reply to  sandy

“We have the right to say no. We have the right to determine how, why and what human tools are developed, or to constrain them.” I do not know who “WE” is, but I do not have any right to say no, if i want to pay my bills, to view a government website, get a balance on my account at the bank or just shop, for consumables or military gear. Google, the corporate owned monopoly in search technology, insist that I reveal my most dark inner secrets. If i don’t bow to Google they will get my government to make me bow.

moneycircus
moneycircus
May 27, 2023 5:44 PM

False claims of ‘deepfake’ President Biden go viral
Fact check: Biden ‘skintone mismatch’ in CNBC interview is due to …
Viral Video of Joe Biden Scratching Neck Sparks Wild … – Newsweek
The trouble is, once media descends to slopping the floor with its own lies, the media is in trouble.
For us Alts, the question is whether this dynamic (or dialectic for post 2000 grads) infects our view.

Junious Ricardo Stanton
Junious Ricardo Stanton
May 27, 2023 5:42 PM

“I guess if things go as planned, most of us will not be able to afford the magic techno-chip or nano particle that will keep us alive forever. And we can’t rent the thing, unless of course we are slaves and pay our monthly rental charge with our sweat, blood, and tears.”
If things go as planned most of us will not live to see The Great Reset fully play out while those of us who stay alive will experience life either in an altered state (made cyborgs, Zombies and automatons) or we’ll be vilified, demonized and relentlessly hounded by the plutocrats’ thugs for our noncompliance and resistance.

Joe
Joe
May 28, 2023 5:31 AM

People in many ways are already all three of those things.

Rob
Rob
May 27, 2023 4:45 PM

These mother fuckers ignore the cause of many diseases but they’ll spend millions and billions on stupid bullshit genetic stuff to cure something that they have been freaking poisoning people for with the most stupidest treatment before the COVID shots..

Chemo fucking therapy is poison.

Shin
Shin
May 27, 2023 5:04 PM
Reply to  Rob

Absolutely! I can not agree more.

Todd Hayen
Todd Hayen
May 27, 2023 5:20 PM
Reply to  Rob

EXACTLY

Kacsynski2
Kacsynski2
May 27, 2023 8:20 PM
Reply to  Todd Hayen

faggot, read the Child in 7 billion by Callie Blackwell.

Woowoo
Woowoo
May 27, 2023 4:45 PM

Talking about Blinded by the Next Great Thing….
Who would of ever thought a child presenter would..?
Phillip schofield (schoolfield) the names of theses people.
(Phil the fiddler) is on the rack being toasted. GMTV wont be the same with him.
Massive news in the U.K for the last week or so.
Did he coming out ?? and do a Kevin spacey to avoid past issues he had with very young male runners (scouts inexperience employees who work for Tv company’s) promising them = fame and fortunes and invites.
Never the less he has been truly cancelled.
Warning for other..?

moneycircus
moneycircus
May 27, 2023 5:00 PM
Reply to  Woowoo

Living long time outside the UK it amazes me to watch the near perverted gymnastics into which journalists tie themselves to avoid the obvious.

The Telegraph tries to invert the fact that TV presenter Philip Schofield, who as the brother of a pedophile knows a lot, could have dared to expose that knowledge in an interview with British politicians. “He should have been sacked,” it declares.

Yet compared to the BBC’s silence over Jimmy Savile, Schofield was doing the nation a service. Have I read it wrong?

Shin
Shin
May 27, 2023 3:39 PM

Good stuff Todd. I am an old school retired engineer/mechanic. When an old car comes into my garage I smile.
More so if its vintage.

SeamusPadraig
SeamusPadraig
May 27, 2023 3:32 PM

About the only technological advancement in my lifetime that I have truly fallen in love with and can’t live without is the internet — and even that’s why it scares me just a bit. The rest, such as the iPhones, I have been indifferent (or even hostile) to from the start.

moneycircus
moneycircus
May 27, 2023 4:13 PM
Reply to  SeamusPadraig

I don’t think it’s the Internet – I could give it up tomorrow. It’s that in certain circumstances, giving up Internet is giving up people.

Friends are now no more than acquaintances – I saw that in the London of the 1990s which is one reason I left.

That has to revert to base… and if the Internet has to die, so be it.

Thomas L Frey
Thomas L Frey
May 27, 2023 11:12 PM
Reply to  moneycircus

For many, giving up the internet, is giving up income too.

Sebastian
Sebastian
May 27, 2023 4:35 PM
Reply to  SeamusPadraig

The tumble or condenser dryer wins hands down – the clothes horse did not finish.

An absolute necessity living in the British Isles.

Some may find the link below an interesting read.

https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/music/2023/05/27/noel-gallagher-theres-an-ai-version-of-freddie-mercury-singing-dont-look-back-in-anger-yknow-get-a-girlfriend/

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
May 27, 2023 8:29 PM
Reply to  Sebastian

It only reminded me of another Gallagher, Rory “Whats in the world”,
https://youtu.be/bj5ejPWxcHQ from the time where we had rock bands.

Brent Cady
Brent Cady
May 28, 2023 5:13 AM
Reply to  Sebastian

If you have a garden big enough to string up a clothes line, you don’t need a tumble dryer.

zenpriest
zenpriest
May 28, 2023 10:02 AM
Reply to  Brent Cady

Apart from November to February.

nylon
nylon
May 27, 2023 3:04 PM

The interface that we use to interact with a machine has a big impact on the way we relate to it.
A text-only interface on a monochromatic screen is still a powerful way to make use of a computer but it minimize the risk of developing an emotional bond with it, it’s easier to remember that we are dealing with just that,a machine.
An interface with a colourful screen full of flashing icons and moving images is already a big jump forward in emotional investment,it provides more stimulation,variety and also some frustration,paving the way for a kind of primitive relationship.
I think the line is then crossed when one starts talking to alexa,possibly the point of no return,when the interface is so natural that it’s blurring our perception of who is who.

The industry is obviously aware of this and pushes for the colorful version because it’s more powerful in creating addiction.
Any alternative product with a simpler interface it’s promtly removed from the market.
One example was the Psion Serie 5,a micro computer with a monochromatic screen that in 1997 was already ahead of its times in terms of software and hardware,a brilliant and powerful computer developed and produced in England.
It was so good that Microsoft bought the enterprise,stopped the production and made sure that nobody heard of it again.
Another example is the e-ink.
It has been around for many years now and it could be very useful if installed on phones and tablets,providing the best screen for reading outdoor, the most eye friendly and the least distractive interface.
We are told that the techonlogy it’s still too slow for anything more advanced than a ebook and still on the market there is no one decent phone or tablet with e-ink screen.
Kindle seems to be the only one that is allowed to flourish in this field,thanks to its almighty owner.
Meanwhile the military enjoy top e-ink tablets to read maps on the battlefields and billionaires have big e-inks screens on the deck of their yachts.

Kacsynski2
Kacsynski2
May 27, 2023 7:08 PM
Reply to  nylon

👆
Not caught up in the “Show” not susceptible. Careful those that were conforming pre-covid hate those that could see before them.

But don’t worry they’ll pretend they weren’t as Covid offers them the opportunity to pretend.

moneycircus
moneycircus
May 27, 2023 2:06 PM

Of replacement by robots, it is that an acceptable metaphor for migration in techno world?

Robot music of course did more than kill the soul in film music – it destroyed music, as culture, as “enlistenment,” as a common voice of humanity.

Humans may be enamoured of gadgetry but that is by design. Someone makes it.

“Most diseases we acquired through animals due to our rather “unnatural” way of cultivating them as food sources.” Dubious – is Todd saying that or is it sarcasm?

The common thread is that any motive, any perpetrator is invisible.

If you live in London, New York or Toronto I imagine ignoring perpetrators and motive is demanded for acceptance, if not essential to survival.

As one who is a legal resident of all three – but exiled from all – it may be something I imagine.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
May 27, 2023 1:02 PM

giving up on modern medicine is NOT gong back to the stone age.

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
May 27, 2023 2:57 PM
Reply to  sabelmouse

Precisely. Giving up on modern medicine is a tiger jump from the stone age. Especially if we frame it in God’s will.

Thanks Todd, for naming God’s purpose in the article. It the most sad story of it all. That people dont understand how 100 times more wonderful God’s will and purpose is in his beautiful Creation.

My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge: because thou hast rejected knowledge, I will also reject thee, that thou shalt be no priest to me… (Hosea 4:6 KJV)

Todd Hayen
Todd Hayen
May 27, 2023 3:00 PM
Reply to  sabelmouse

I do like to think what you say is true…and am curious to see what that would look like, my wife asked me the other day if I wanted to just “give up modern medicine” and pointed out that people didn’t live nearly as long back in the day. I would think lifespan should not be the driving factor for medicine…but even then, it would seem that dentists had more to do with longevity than medicine  😀  also hygiene, clean water, etc.

Woowoo
Woowoo
May 27, 2023 4:36 PM
Reply to  Todd Hayen

clean water..?

you means a ‘medical chemical solution’ that come out of the tap called water which it isnt.

Todd Hayen
Todd Hayen
May 27, 2023 5:22 PM
Reply to  Woowoo

No, I am speaking of a time when water was actually clean. And as civilization became more congested, the efforts to keep that water clean. Today, forget it…

Hemlockfen
Hemlockfen
May 27, 2023 6:48 PM
Reply to  Todd Hayen

What is clean water? Just watched the movie Picnic (released in 1955) and cringed as William Holden (a freight riding bum) bathed in a river. This was before the push for building sewage treatment plants and raw sewage was routinely dumped in lakes and streams everywhere.

In the 1920s the slow moving Des Plaines River (Illinois) often dried up during hot summer periods creating stagnant cesspools of festering sewage dumped by people living along the river.

The fast growing organization called the Forest Preserve District of Cook County bought up much of the land along the river in the 20s and 30s. A series of low rise dams were constructed to hold water in the channel all year round. The dams were wide enough for a model A to use as a river crossing.

The pools below the dams were opened for recreational swimming. As you can imagine they did not stay open long and anyone with half a brain can figure out why.

I worked for the organization.

Quite an archive of photos stashed away and not spoken about. This was just outside of Chicago.

All of Chicago’s raw sewage went into the Chicago River which drained to Lake Michigan, the main source of Chicago’s fresh water. People began dropping like flies. Ninety thousand people died of typhoid, dysentery and cholera over span of time before 1900. Then they dug a canal and sent the raw sewage down to the Gulf of Mexico via the Des Plaines, Illinois and Mississippi Rivers. People who lived along these rivers were really pissed which generated a lot of turmoil which generated new laws and designated authorities.

To this day, Chicago still has combined storm and sewage piping.

You would think.

While we spend billions of dollars on saving the world from climate change, Chicago is still mixing storm water with raw sewage and occasionally dumps raw sewage into lake Michigan. They do have a backup holding system that is undersized and badly engineered. It involves a massive tunneling system beneath the city where storm water is diverted and held while it contaminates ground water throughout the region. Just like Mexico, don’t drink the groundwater around Chicago.

Then you have lead piping everywhere in every metropolitan area across the country.

You would think.

Of course there were native populations (I wrote about this in the past). The latest estimate is that 20 million people lived east of the Mississippi during prehistory. The population of the Amazon Forest area in South America was roughly the same during the same period.

“Suddenly” most of them died. I am thinking, typhoid, cholera, dysentery.

Was water ever really clean?

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
May 27, 2023 9:08 PM
Reply to  Hemlockfen

First, God designed it so all living always had food and water available close. Rain is drinking water directly to your face.

Next, if you have contaminated water somewhere, its easy to clean with simple natural materials. See ref. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8CjPPTjVcew

Wait 10 minutes when it rains, dust and pollution will have gone, and the rest is virgin water.
If you suspect acid rain or HARP rain with nano aluminium, m.m. some cotton, charcoal, stone fractions will take the most.

Some drops of chlorine or boiling or 2 hours in the sun kill all bacteria.

Water always available.

Hemlockfen
Hemlockfen
May 27, 2023 9:34 PM
Reply to  Erik Nielsen

My point: It was suggested that there was a time somewhere in the past when water was clean enough to, simply, drink. There was never such a time. Then there is prehistory when tens of millions of people simply dropped from the face of the earth for “some” reason. I am not talking about today with modern methods to clean up relatively minuscule amounts of water on a camp site in a remote woodland. Milipore filters are a relatively new innovation. I don’t know how long chlorine was readily available. When was it that Pasteur developed his process? My point again: There was never a time when water was, simply, drinkable. A misinterpretation of the past.

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
May 27, 2023 10:05 PM
Reply to  Hemlockfen

I think you are wrong. I have been in Canadian forests and Greenland. The only pollution can be faeces from animals.
But the water I drank was beautiful

But as said, I know the natives used charcoal to clean the river water for eventualities. I mean people can complicate everything if they want, but why not take God’s way.

Clearly we have a problem if chemical factories nearby spew out quick silver or other nasty pollution to rivers as they do.
But remember, the pollution media stories are fakes most of them.
I have been on Sao Paulo beaches. 22 mio inhabitants, and the beach is clean as a baby butt and the sea is nice and clean to swim in.
Polluted nature is mostly a libtard profit media scam from wall street.
They deliberately mess things up for providing more public funding to projects.

Hele
Hele
May 28, 2023 6:33 AM
Reply to  Hemlockfen

I have a well.The water tastes wonderful and is extremely safe to drink.

Hemlockfen
Hemlockfen
May 28, 2023 2:58 PM
Reply to  Hele

As do I. My well is only 40 feet deep. Sand and gravel all the way down with a water table only a few feet down. Pigs and cows frequented the adjacent fen at one point in time.

The implication was surface waters.

I do not fully trust my well and no one should.

At my previous home, my well extended 261 feet into the Valparaiso Moraine and 6 feet further into bedrock. It went through 4 different veins of gravel buried in the moraine.

Most ground water sources have a recharge zone where water percolates from the surface somewhere.

Always get your water tested for fecal coliforms on a regular basis. Never assume it’s “clean”. New well construction requires a coliform test for a reason. Some counties require a well coliform test every time a home ownership changes.

My parents lived in a rural area with a shallow well. My whole family got sick every time we visited. I urged my parents to test their well. They were offended.

Sorry to burst your bubble……

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
Jun 1, 2023 12:24 PM
Reply to  Hemlockfen

So you deliberately went out to shit on the surface close to the well to show their well too were polluted? ( 😉 )

mgeo
mgeo
May 28, 2023 8:38 AM
Reply to  Hemlockfen

Did most aborigines (people living in biomes) not manage fine drinking such water all the time?

Hemlockfen
Hemlockfen
May 28, 2023 2:39 PM
Reply to  mgeo

As I wrote, no. They didn’t. They died. Who knows how many times that cycle recurred.

thinking-turtle
thinking-turtle
May 28, 2023 9:03 AM
Reply to  Hemlockfen

In the Alps the mountain paths have drinking troughs when they cross a stream and hikers drink freely. You can also drink rainwater, or water from a well.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
May 28, 2023 11:32 AM

i remember those.

Hemlockfen
Hemlockfen
May 28, 2023 3:09 PM

Right. Maybe they did and still do. I wouldn’t. I would be willing to bet there was some kind of disclaimer somewhere. Obviously your odds would be better at not picking up fecal coliforms than in the Des Plaines River or Lake Michigan but is severe diarrhea worth the risk? That would mess up your expensive vacation. Wells and rainwater are a whole different thing. Again, I was referring to prehistory when surface waters were frequented in relatively densely populated areas. And I don’t mean goats.

thinking-turtle
thinking-turtle
May 28, 2023 5:30 PM
Reply to  Hemlockfen

Mountain streams are excellent drinking water. There is no risk of diarrhea at all. There is no disclaimer. And it’s Switzerland, where everything is regulated and safe, and they dislike like risk of any sort.

Hemlockfen
Hemlockfen
May 29, 2023 11:44 AM

Go for it. How do you regulate wild animals to keep them from crapping in the mountains?

A friend asked me to do an assessment of some land he owned in the U.P. (of Michigan). Relatively steep terrain with a small stream running through the middle of it.

A “local” agreed to show us around and provide an anecdotal history of land use. Springs were welling up at the base of the sand and gravel hills that formed the stream that appeared and disappeared.

The local swore that it was drinkable. He and my friend partook. I cringed and said no way. Of course, my friend developed a severe case of diarrhea. Don’t know what happened to the local.

It wasn’t the Alps but it was spring water which was probably cleaner at it’s origin than Alps mountain water.

Sure, during mountain spring melts the pathogens are diluted and the concentrations are lower. But they are there and always will be.

If your body is in a bad place and you decide to expose yourself to potential pathogens, that’s on you.

I would recommend that you carry a low volume pocket filter and an empty water bottle like most educated camper/hikers would do.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
May 28, 2023 11:30 AM
Reply to  Hemlockfen

i’m pretty sure there were clean mountain streams ectr.

who drooped when?

KiwiJoker
KiwiJoker
May 27, 2023 10:10 PM
Reply to  Erik Nielsen

Water is God.

Joe
Joe
May 28, 2023 5:38 AM
Reply to  Hemlockfen

Saying that the indigenous died of ‘disease’ serves the dual purpose of perpetuating the viral myth while also providing the colonizers a bit of shielding by saying “shucks, they died of disease, what could have been done.”

The reality is that billions of humans and other living beings constituting the global natural living ecological environment have been brutally genocided by the monarchs and financiers of western Europe in the past 500 years, and this genocide is ongoing at the rate of 48 FOOTBALL FIELDS of deforestation a MINUTE.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
May 28, 2023 11:33 AM
Reply to  Joe

that too.

Hemlockfen
Hemlockfen
May 28, 2023 3:10 PM
Reply to  Joe

This was prehistory. Generally, that means Europeans who could read and write.

Hele
Hele
May 28, 2023 6:31 AM
Reply to  Hemlockfen

I love that movie-watched it for the first time.So dark and complex-fated romance-creepy 50’s -kind of like this era-full of promises peer pressure and judgements.

Hemlockfen
Hemlockfen
May 28, 2023 3:13 PM
Reply to  Hele

Great movie. Thanks for that comment. My wife. My beautiful wife. Kim Novak paled in comparison. She similar dress.

mgeo
mgeo
May 28, 2023 8:35 AM
Reply to  Hemlockfen

In urban development, one trend is to merge sewers with the other pipes for grey water from homes and storm water. The justification is that the water can be recovered for uses other than drinking.

Hemlockfen
Hemlockfen
May 28, 2023 3:35 PM
Reply to  mgeo

Until you have a storm. Then you are screwed. Like the 90K that died in Chicago during a short time span. But it saved money.

Chicago has other issues that make it unique. It sits in the bed of ancient Lake Chicago which existed at the end of the last glaciation. After the great torrent that powered through the Valparaiso Moraine and drained Lake Chicago you were left with sand and silt perched on bedrock. All of Chicago was raised at one point because of the high water tables. It was not raised high enough.

Last I knew, wastewater could not be used in farming operations. For obvious reasons. I am fully aware that wastewater is being recycled for human consumption. Pumped with chlorine after tertiary treatment. Fit for people to drink but not growing crops because of the high levels of chlorine.

Go figure.

Can’t wait till vat farms are in full operation. They will consume vast amounts of water. Where will they get it and how will they clean it up to keep from contaminating their product?

I digress.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
May 28, 2023 11:28 AM
Reply to  Hemlockfen

people living in crowds creates problems.

Hemlockfen
Hemlockfen
May 28, 2023 3:39 PM
Reply to  sabelmouse

My young neighbor suggested that we all “spread out” and develop family owned and operated 5 acre farmettes. Meanwhile Klaus and WEF wants 80% of the population receiving UBI and living in modular high rises in 15 minute cities. The best way to save the world from climate change.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
May 28, 2023 4:57 PM
Reply to  Hemlockfen

i know! though people did already move to cities before.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
May 28, 2023 11:26 AM
Reply to  Woowoo

still mostly preferable to having actual effluent in your water.

Thomas L Frey
Thomas L Frey
May 27, 2023 11:16 PM
Reply to  Todd Hayen

Except people throughout history have in fact lived long lives. Lives into their 70s and 80s. The difference was that this was normally not available to the average peasant and their shorter life span had more to do with standard of living and cleanliness.

I always think about the scene in Monty Python’s Holy Grail when the peasant says, “He must be the King because he isn’t covered in shit.”

The only difference between modern medicine and poison, is dosage.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
May 28, 2023 11:35 AM
Reply to  Thomas L Frey

also average lifespan/anything tends to be misleading.

Clive Williams
Clive Williams
May 28, 2023 4:02 AM
Reply to  Todd Hayen

Todd as a writer and if my Sister was still alive we’d both come on here and state you can’t comment in a public environment as yourself.
You’ve made it uneasy further by replying as third person by not asking your Wife first…
Sorry, but how do you feel about a mark of social atmosphere if they were a lot more urban development encouraging walking neighborhoods. It’s particularly noticeable in the United States since I first visited here in 1968. Furthermore a much reduced social movement in towns and cities. The political wrangling over time lapsed “15mins Cities” is already under way for quite some time imo.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
May 28, 2023 11:26 AM
Reply to  Todd Hayen

there are so many factors re longevity.
poverty/overcrowding/bad housing lack of sanitation/food, all make a /the real difference.
the official story is that vaccines/modern medicine did/does, when in reality it’s only good for emergencies.
not health care, and causes as much/more harm than good.
another issue is average lifespan.
which is a median [ if that’s the word], there’ve been long lived people in the past, i realised that when i saw jane austen’s family tree.

it’s one of those myths that without modern medicine /technology we’d be living in terrible situations/die.

we could take the real improvements and mix them with sanity from other eras.

Junious Ricardo Stanton
Junious Ricardo Stanton
May 27, 2023 5:47 PM
Reply to  sabelmouse

I agree, iatrogenic “medicine” is a major cause of death and injury in the modern world and we have plutocrats like John D. Rockefeller Bill Gates and their avarice and immorality to thank for that.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
May 28, 2023 11:37 AM

up to a point because we tend to go along with things, so we’re also responsible.

George Mc
George Mc
May 27, 2023 12:01 PM

“The Next Great Thing” is echoes by “The Next Great Acronym” (which is my excuse for going slightly off topic).

Anyway we now have (in Canada at least)

“2SLGBTQI+”

“2S” has something to do with two spirits. Which has something to do with the native population.

But it seems to me that the ever expanding acronym compulsion indicates an increasingly pathological inability to confront the true public.

Todd Hayen
Todd Hayen
May 27, 2023 2:57 PM
Reply to  George Mc

Very interesting…yes, I recently heard of the “2S” and I nearly rolled my eyes out of my head.

Thomas L Frey
Thomas L Frey
May 27, 2023 11:17 PM
Reply to  George Mc

Isn’t 2S for people that identify as an animal and not human?

Hele
Hele
May 28, 2023 6:38 AM
Reply to  Thomas L Frey

It’s for mental liberals search for meaning.

thinking-turtle
thinking-turtle
May 27, 2023 11:35 AM

Thanks for a good read on Pentecost Saturday!

Most diseases we acquired through animals due to our rather “unnatural” way of cultivating them as food sources.

What disease can you acquire from other humans? Let alone other animals?

Johnny
Johnny
May 27, 2023 12:18 PM

From humans? Ignorance, racism, misogyny, avarice, hubris and many blood and neurological disorders.
From animals? BSE, Rabies and Malaria to name a few.

Thomas L Frey
Thomas L Frey
May 27, 2023 11:30 PM
Reply to  Johnny

Ignorance, racism, misogyny, avarice, and hubris are not diseases. At least not in the technical and biological sense.

Based on how many jabs people have gotten in the modern era, including the the consumption of medicines, and processed food stuff, I would lean toward blood and neurological disorders being related to those, rather than primarily natural or actually genetic heritage.

As far as humans getting mad cow disease (BSE) from eating meat, I’m not buying it. The acid in our stomachs basically kills everything. You can literally drink some venomous poisons and the stomach acid will stop it from killing you. Granted you will probably have a very painful gut and bowel movements. 

Also cows are developing BSE because their feed contains beef products. BSE is the result of cannibalism. Something that has been known and studied from cannibalistic tribes. Tribes that eventually go extinct as a result.

Bites that deposit bacteria into the bloodstream are the real threat, I think.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
May 28, 2023 11:47 AM
Reply to  Thomas L Frey

vaccines are KNOWN to cause autoimmunity/allergies.

known about egg protein for 100 years.

peanut oil was tried as adjuvant for a short period.

that’s the called mysterious genetic something or other. ”we just don’t know but the marvels of science/modern medicine will sort it out”.

yes injection vs ingestion, very different.

and some feed, but also maybe vaccines.

i read that the dreadful canine parvo was caused by a vaccine for cats, i can’t remember the details now.

the constant vaccination of pets , and animals kept in less than ideal conditions.

even tetanus is not quite as described.

if we can’t acquire immunity over time how does the vaccine work?

and knowing about wound treatment, letting it bleed/washing it ectr would be useful

few know that its anaerobic, for instance, or overall about how to prevent wound festering and such.
just take a vaccine, be depended on pharm, at best, and injured/killed at worst, and that was pre 20.

also, passive tetanus serum used to be used when i was younger, for after an accident, though it was giving for anything, even a bruise, and now i think one can’t even get it separately but must take a multi shot.

given a vax after is insane enough but giving the whole dtp or whatever to ”prevent” tetanus?!?!?

thinking-turtle
thinking-turtle
May 28, 2023 8:56 AM
Reply to  Johnny

Malaria is a parasite. They do seem to exist.

If you are aware of a study that shows rabies or any other disease to be transferable, please share.

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
May 27, 2023 3:20 PM

Gonorrhea, Syphilis, Herpes, HIV/Aids, Tuberculosis, Hepatitis, Moms, Small pox, Plague, Post Traumatic Disorder, Mental deceases, Torture scars.

All these deceases are what your neighbour does to YOU to erase you from this planet, dead gone from the competition of our limited resources on our dining table. Bastard!

George Mc
George Mc
May 27, 2023 11:14 AM

The compulsion towards updating technology is powered by the drive towards ceaseless profit maximisation. The moment when the madness really hit me was when I heard about a proposal to introduce “bendable” smart phones. How spectacularly useless other than to sell people another gimmick. Thankfully that one never took off (yet at least!) But even this matter of having an Alexa – “Ooh look, all I have to do is speak!” – is yet another gimmick. But that was one that everyone fell for.

Johnny
Johnny
May 27, 2023 10:29 AM

Technology is a two edged sword. With the quick and convenient comes the addictive and the asinine.

The trick is to show discernment and avoid, as much as is possible, the latter.

Victor G.
Victor G.
May 27, 2023 9:15 AM

Thanks, Todd.
I refuse to use the term “artificial intelligence”. Intelligence cannot/will never be the the attribute of a machine, the same way a serum that affects one’s genetic composition will never be a “vaccine”. The manipulation of the significance of words is fundamental to all dictatorships Orwell docet.
A.I.? Would “hyper-robotics” be more accurate? Unfortunately, H.R. has already been appropriated by another hypocritical appendage of this miserable system and the bosses adore acronyms.

Todd Hayen
Todd Hayen
May 27, 2023 2:55 PM
Reply to  Victor G.

Very good point.

Thomas L Frey
Thomas L Frey
May 27, 2023 11:33 PM
Reply to  Victor G.

How about calling it Autonomic Intelligence?

T.S.
T.S.
May 28, 2023 2:21 PM
Reply to  Thomas L Frey

The only problem is it does not contain any intelligence, it is an Intelligence simulation at best.

Thomas Frey
Thomas Frey
May 28, 2023 5:06 PM
Reply to  T.S.

Autonomic meaning just a constant process driven by a form of intelligence.

For example the autonomic processes in the human body. Breathing, sweating, heartbeat, waste processing and disposal. All the stuff the human body does without thinking.

It s a form of biological intelligence in that it keeps the body living.

T.S.
T.S.
May 28, 2023 2:20 PM
Reply to  Victor G.

Thare is no Intelligence in AI anyway. The whole thing is just a big hype to sell new electronic crap.

NickM
NickM
May 27, 2023 9:00 AM

“if technology hasn’t relieved us from the suffering of cancer, there is something whacked going on here as the mechanism of cancer doesn’t seem as complicated as the mechanism of an mRNA vaccine.”

Todd, your heart is in the right place; but if you think an mRNA Vaxx is more complicated than the mechanism of cancer your brain is wandering too far afield. You should get back to Acoustic Music.

Evolution gave genus Homo our unique Talus ankle-bone, so we could walk upright. That freed our hands to make mischief and/or tools. Acoustic instruments, AI music and RNA medicine are just tools. Used for better or for worse, whatever each of us sign up to.

“The soul of Bach could find as much room in a penny whistle (or an IBM 7094) as in full orchestral chorus supplemented by the mighty organ” — Arnold Schoenberg.

Todd Hayen
Todd Hayen
May 27, 2023 2:53 PM
Reply to  NickM

My wife died of cancer, and I dived into the whole cancer world rather deeply during the time of her illness. From what I learned I definitely believe that cancer has been kept “alive and well” for so long because it is the biggest money maker for the medical system that has ever been.

My comparison of complexity to mRNA technology may not be accurate, but I do find it bewildering that modern science and technology can learn the techniques to manipulate gene proteins in such a sophisticated manner but cannot claim to have found a cure, or even a treatment other than burning, cutting, and poisoning, for cancer.

NickM
NickM
May 27, 2023 5:14 PM
Reply to  Todd Hayen

Everyone has had a family member die of cancer. Cancer and cardiovascular disease are the 2 leading causes of noncommunicable disease mortality worldwide. That shows how little progress medical science has made since Hippocrates:

“To cure sometimes, to comfort always” — Hippocrates, co 500 BC.

But the biggest cause of Death is Life; something even more puzzling than heart, cancer, RNA, AI, music and soul all rolled up together into one big ball of mystery.

KiwiJoker
KiwiJoker
May 27, 2023 10:14 PM
Reply to  NickM

Also the largest pro-generator of Life is Death.

They are not separate phenomena.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
May 28, 2023 11:59 AM
Reply to  NickM

it has made progress, it [helps to ] creates them.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
May 28, 2023 11:58 AM
Reply to  Todd Hayen

it creates cancer. inadvertently, through pollution ectr, or vaccines, or on purpose, through vaccines, and ”food”.
and would not want healing of any kind. it’s more than money too, power/control.
having said that: we’re generally complicit.

Willem
Willem
May 27, 2023 8:20 AM

Too many generalizations to make a coherent comment.

You paint with a too big brush here Todd.

People are made of individuals. Individuals are not people.

‘ Men, it has been well said, think in herds; it will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, one by one.’

Give it time and work on it on a one to one basis. Starting with yourself may be a good starting point.

Christine Thompson
Christine Thompson
May 27, 2023 1:15 PM
Reply to  Willem

The excellent American writer, Gary D Barnett, has written of precisely what you say in your post above, in his latest article. He makes the point that most people (the brainwashed, naive masses) are part of the ‘societal herd’, and that people should take back their own individual power, and thus not to meekly comply with the evil group of people who run/control planet Earth.

Link below:

“Divisive societal collectivism is a primary driver of total control over the people”, at:

https://garydbarnett.com/divisive-societal-collectivism-is-a-primary-driver-of-total-control-over-the-people

Todd Hayen
Todd Hayen
May 27, 2023 2:54 PM
Reply to  Willem

Yes, I agree I paint with broad strokes a lot of the time. It is only intended a food for thought…

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
May 28, 2023 11:59 AM
Reply to  Willem

one must start with oneself.