69

John Pilger: A Life of Fearless Journaling A Reflection on Our Overlapping Interests

Daniel Broudy

It’s a strange thing about human affairs, our natural need to feel belonging, and how, if given time to pause and parse what we think we know about the world, we can begin to see through the grand illusions made to manage human perception and to maintain a mediated, tightly controlled false sense of reality.

Such facts moved John Pilger for decades, and his work bore witness to the question of whether belonging in a world of lies should be something citizens should ever tolerate.

Since the tender age of 12, John was interested in journalism when he started his first newspaper, “The Messenger,” which he admitted “wasn’t very good, but it was a rather good effort.” His political awakening came when he finally left his “comfortable western country” to see “countries that were devastated … in terms of impoverishment, in terms of what war had done to them.”

Over his career, he consistently broke through the glossy exterior of numerous falsehoods broadcast and put into print for mass consumption.

From Vietnam to Iraq, Syria to Diego Garcia and well beyond, he journaled the bizarre illusions upheld by empires in his ceaseless efforts to demythologize corporate news narratives and to offer a view of the empirical world unadorned by fear or favor, political cant, obfuscation, and doublespeak. He probed coercive power structures and prodded his readers to pause and think, and that sense of unblinking service to his vocation changed many hearts and minds and opened many up to contemplate how thoroughly craven the power-hungry are.

Because of John’s work, I too was coaxed out of the corporate media echo chambers which had confused and obscured my own view of the world. In late December 1989, we witnessed from Howard Air Force Base the AC-130 gunships circling over Panama City pulverizing El Chorrillo, the site of General Manuel Noriega’s La Comandancia. It was a nighttime assault that George H.W. Bush would announce to the world as “Operation Just Cause,” and, as analysts, we were keen to cut through the clouds of political confusion to better understand what was real and what was staged since war was (and has always been) the best theatre in which to see emerge all the key ID features of mass deception.

When word came to our small detachment of analysts that the fiercest fighting had subsided, a small squad of us were ordered into the city into the confines of the battered headquarters to determine what our analysis was able to achieve for the blunt edge of American cannon fire in close quarters. Four of us mounted a modified Humvee and made our way into Chorrillo.

Seated in the back, we surveyed blocks of the smoldering city and the faces of bystanders. We moved past local women and men stoic and wandering, it seemed, without aim. On a street corner, a boy stood motionless, his forefinger searching a nostril, his cheek crosshatched by soot from nearby buildings set ablaze.

As we neared Noriega’s main headquarters, I sought to locate something in the expressions of the people that would square with the popular CNN portrayal of events that followed the intense tactical operation. Framed for television audiences in America were gathered groups of jubilant Panamanians cheering on the troops, but we found not a trace of elation and relief in their faces. Where was the euphoria?

The closer we drew to our destination the more incredulous it seemed. Ornate rows of thick palms that had lined certain streets like Doric columns along the route lay shattered and singed. Occasional stray cats and dogs roamed about inspecting the splattered remains of their own kind. Huge concrete structures that once stood proud were distilled in mounds of powdered masonry, rubble, and twisted rebar while wooden edifices lay in heaps of smoldering ash.

Finally, the Humvee came to a halt. We dismounted, filed into the headquarters, picking our way past wreckage and fallen walls, and found a route into the remains of La Comandancia. Though the bodies had been removed, the caustic whiff of rotting flesh still hung in the humid air and merged with the fabric of our BDUs.

The blood-spattered walls and floors were like a vast Rorschach splotch testing my curiosity to comprehend the effects of state violence on flesh and bone. As the dust of crumbled walls and a posy of gunpowder floated around us, our trek through the confines brought us to a dimly-lit room where on one wall hung a lonely metal crucifix, like “humanity hanging on a cross of iron.” Suddenly there surrounding me were all the palpable ironies of sacrifice to state power.

In early March 1990, hardly more than a month after the final run of airborne artillery had pounded Chorrillo and the fog of confusion began lifting, I stumbled upon a scene whose sights, sounds, and scents I have not been able to fully erase from memory. During a morning run through Corozal, the imprinted odor of the deceased, still haunting me from Chorrillo, began pursuing me again. It captured my full attention along the route when I peered behind a mysterious tarpaulin barrier where I espied the rotting bodies that had been shoveled into black vinyl bags.

The exposed and bloated limbs of some seemed to be inviting my attention to the great hole from where they had come. I averted my gaze to see just beyond the burial site, rippling in the breeze, an outline of palm leaves on trees set against a cobalt sky as the acrid scent of bodies fused with my memory. I turned like a tin soldier and moved on, breathing not a word to myself. Did my mind really register what my eyes had beheld? Had I made some sort of subconscious attempt to delete the images? In a dream that night, the eyes in a mass of ghost-white faces fixed their gaze upon me from the darkness of a deep grave. With arms outstretched, they summoned me to join them.

Before the discovery of mirror neurons, skeptics who had never seen the effects of shrapnel and cannon fire on human flesh would refer to men and women living out the consequences of combat horror as contending with “battle fatigue.”

Other euphemisms since propagated by mass media now cloud the minds of the general public fully alienated from the horrors that replay in the minds of all unfortunate souls caught up in the maelstrom of launched missiles, bombs and bayonets. The political powers in privileged offices, who prevail over the sensibilities of common people — bearing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder — roam free from their own complicity in normalizing the term “disorder” and the unlimited decades-long campaigns of bombing, strafing, psychologically torturing, injecting, and herding populations into total conformity and submission.

The connotations associated with PTSD call up images of the clinical as if to pretend that recurrent moments of torment follow logically from some mysterious inexplicable mental malfunction in the host. Like all other forms of euphemism, the sterile abbreviation, seems to me, enables the major hustlers of war and creative economic destruction to collaborate with their congregants in the corporate media and to go on agitating the irrational fear and loathing needed to mobilize men and women to send off to new planned invasions.

In 1992, John Pilger’s documentary “War By Other Means” dared me as a warrior to revisit memories of the violence visited upon Panamanian people, especially those in the poorest neighborhoods of the city. “It’s been the poor of the world who have financed the rich,” noted John, “and not the other way around.” So, I had to return, in my mind, to parts of the old city, before the ordnance and flames came to dissolve the elements and dispossess so many local people of their homes and livelihoods, the places where we used to gather routinely with friends for lobster tails and Piña Coladas.

“Instead of soldiers dying,” John observed, “it’s children dying. […] It’s like a colonial war in which people and resources are controlled not by viceroys and occupying armies, but more sophisticated means, of which, the principal weapon is debt.” John’s measured tone had a way of penetrating and moving the cold disinterested hearts of his audience.

I was promptly transported to a time when my father recounted to me stories he’d heard as a teen about the exploits of General Smedley D. Butler, a self-described strongman for the big banking houses of Brown Brothers and National City Bank, a man who knew the costs of war rendered “a horrible accounting [in] newly placed gravestones, mangled bodies, shattered minds, broken hearts and homes, economic instability, depression and all its attendant miseries, [and] back-breaking taxation for generations and generations.”

My father, a veteran of WWII, recalled the time he had heard about General Butler explaining in a 1933 speech how the brutal cycle of financing rolls onward and into all the forms of antidemocratic development in nations ripe for “investment” opportunities:

I helped in the raping of half a dozen central American republics for the benefit of Wall Street. The record of racketeering is long. Looking back on it…I feel that I could have given Al Capone a few hints. The best [Capone] could do was operate his racket in three city districts. We Marines operated on three continents. I spent 33 years in the Marines, most of my time being a high-class muscleman for big business, for Wall Street and the big bankers. In short, I was a racketeer for capitalism.”

The Great Depression of the 1930s and its associated suffering had clearly made my dad more enthusiastic than many of his peers to understand the extent to which the real economy was not guided so much by some invisible hand of the market but by those who controlled the levers of finance and investment, who powered the Treasury’s printing press pumping out all those glorious “legal notes” of questionable value.

John Pilger’s work reassured me that the lessons I had learned as a child were not misplaced, that the post-WWII era, with the rise of the IMF and World Bank, triggered the

“process of coercing most of humanity into debt as a means of controlling their resources, their labor, and their governments … almost half a century ago. It was not called colonialism … a term made defunct by WWII. There were new ‘hopeful’ euphemisms. Indeed, this was the beginning of what President [H.W.] Bush now calls the ‘New World Order’.”

It’s no wonder why John’s incisive analysis remains prescient decades after publication. A mere glance at the state of the world today should apprise the conscious onlooker of how his 1992 reporting on debt as a weapon of war is illustrated in the big pharma capture of governments around the world. Funded by the World Bank, the Covid-19 operation has served as a powerful trigger of controlling the careful demolition of the old world and paving the way for a “New Normal” — outfitted with all the newfangled levers of technocratic control, the biometric IDs and programmable CBDCs to be imposed upon a new class of debt slaves, told “what they can and cannot own” and herded safely and securely into 15-minute cities.

When John and his film crew came to Okinawa to shoot The Coming War on China in 2015, I had the pleasure of being invited to the effort. John knew the weird irony of shooting a film about an approaching war on location in an island in the Pacific whose major American presence was signified by the name, Camp Smedley D. Butler.

We talked a lot about how the old world began disintegrating so rapidly after 9/11, like three New York City skyscrapers reduced to dust in their own carbon footprint, after former General Wesley Clark divulged the Pentagon plan to pacify 7 countries in 5 years. At the time, we could hardly imagine that in just a few short years of filming that the whole world would appear to go mad, that all the institutions we knew and relied on would mutate from a global infection of some malignant public-private pathological condition.

Given the major themes the film would address, the excesses and rank abuses of state power, it did not occur to us at the time, when discussing the hideous clandestine “medical” experiments with radiological weapons, tested on unsuspecting human beings throughout the Marshall Islands for years following WWII, that the world would see a similar experiment launched under the guise of “The Science.”

Since the global rollout of the weapons needed to establish that New World Order imagined by George H.W. Bush, it has not been easy to observe the pointless disintegration of nations, national boundaries, identities, and sovereignty — bodily or otherwise.

Nowadays, with the financialization and commodification of everything, it would seem to be an overwhelming and futile effort to try to mount some sort of defense against the multi-pronged government-backed wars being waged across the planet against food and nature, against the sky and water, against society and economy, against human identity and family, against civil and human rights, against the human genome and the human psyche. If the investment companies, banks, and insurance companies have made a killing on the Covid-19 operation, it is easy to see how “the love of money is a root of all kinds of evil.”

It’s easy to see, furthermore, how John’s Coming War on China serves as an apt metaphor for a war on all of humanity. His recent passing in late December, sad as it is, reminds us to keep standing for and defending the empirical world, no matter who is selling the lies and deceptions. Surely, John Pilger would approve!

Daniel Broudy, Ph.D., is a professor of applied linguistics at Okinawa Christian University. His latest book, co-authored with Miyume Tanji, is Okinawa Under Occupation: McDonaldization and Resistance to Neoliberal Propaganda (Palgrave, 2017).

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Raz Putin
Raz Putin
Jan 14, 2024 4:55 PM

Hello offG mods I made post about yesterday on this article that has yet to appear here??? After posting my comment it read “pending” ??? Am I being censored here.

Sam - Admin2
Admin
Sam - Admin2
Jan 14, 2024 7:09 PM
Reply to  Raz Putin

Nope!

Lizzyh7
Lizzyh7
Jan 14, 2024 8:42 PM
Reply to  Raz Putin

We will see if this comment makes it. They’ve apparently got some new thing where they need to “verify your connection” to this site. I wrote a comment earlier today which never made it through, so we’ll see if this one does. Whatever they are using seems to need to “verify the connection” every time I refresh the page. Maybe that will stop tomorrow? Who knows.

Raz Putin
Raz Putin
Jan 15, 2024 2:32 PM
Reply to  Lizzyh7

It looks like my comment went into the offG void and so it goes.

I’m off offG thanks!

Paul Munk
Paul Munk
Jan 14, 2024 3:14 AM

John Pilger was a humanitarian hero who will be desperately missed. Pilger’s soul is now among the brightest lights in the distant sky.
Thank you John, for all your work and for sharing with us, the goodness in your heart.

Hugh O’Neill
Hugh O’Neill
Jan 13, 2024 7:37 PM

RIP John Pilger. This was an excellent tribute by a champion of truth. My only comment on Pilger (which I have made here in OffG before) was his interview on Democracy Now in 2008 the 40th anniversary of the assassination of RFK. JP was no fan of RFK because of his ambivalence on Vietnam. However, JP was witness when the shots were fired. He had counted 12-13 shots fired and knew that there was more than one gunman (Sirhan’s gun held only 8). Amy Goodman ignored this revelation and swiftly moved on to talk about Vietnam. This is how the system works: JP was being shut down. There are limits.

Brianborou
Brianborou
Jan 13, 2024 5:28 PM

Here is another journalist who put his life on the line to expose the truth !

https://southfront.press/r-i-p-gonzalo-lira-journalist-died-in-ukrainian-prison/

No doubt the keyboard warriors will try to denigrate him as well.

Robert Stuart
Robert Stuart
Jan 15, 2024 12:01 AM
Reply to  Brianborou

I never heard him talk about 9/11, but Lira was very direct about the democide shots.

NickM
NickM
Jan 13, 2024 3:03 PM

Fearless Scott Ritter gives eight straight answers:

a. Ukraine. Did NATZO really believe that Ukraine ever had a chance to beat Russia? No

b. Houthi. Will this U$ coalition facelift beat the Houthi blockade of shipping to genocidal Israel? No.

c. Hezb #1.  Can the IDF bomb Hezb’Allah into submission? No.

d. Hezb #2  Can IDF+U$A bomb Hezb into submission? No

e. Nuclear #1. Does the U$A need new nukes to match Russia? No.

f. Nuclear #2. Can the U$A afford to modernize its old nukes? No.

g. Can a current U$ candidate be selected without repeating, Putin is a dictator? No.

h. Is U$ democracy with a new POTU$A every few years more effective than Russian democracy with one President for 20-30 yearsl? No.

The “collective West” (which includes Israel) needs a new mindset to correct multiple stupidity.

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
Jan 14, 2024 2:30 AM
Reply to  NickM

Money. Doing their first crimes they cant stop because the city is full of other gangs who will take over.

gordan
gordan
Jan 13, 2024 12:58 PM

he knew he was working in a lie satanic legal fiction system he took the queens shilling.
was it disclosure or revelation of the method.
all his life he worked for corporations by nature foreign entity parasite host.
daily mail daily mirror gardian,times telegraph,morning star whatever.

atv, central,granada bbc,thames tv carlton mossad tv
reporting on a world in action city of london wall street and the rise of hitler and the bolshevik revolutions.

he did his best but failed the greatest tests talmud 9 and 11 and covid bollox

no history lessons did he give on germ theory pasteur and jenner mass murder no talk of terrain theory.

no talk of lucky larry or chabad chums or the dancing tel aviver or urban moving systems or psychological operations things always where black and white good or bad
never fiction or inverted lucifer story.

like bowie he probably in little america in the sub tropic zones through the ice walls a long career a good run a lover of the booster shot it seems
a teller of tales real for sure of terror horror so we feel power less
control is the system stay on the reservation do not deviate do not pass go
or jail

Jin_Tonic
Jin_Tonic
Jan 13, 2024 12:07 PM

You can do one thing wrong and 1000 good deeds.
That one thing wrong is what they get you on.

Lizzyh7
Lizzyh7
Jan 13, 2024 7:09 PM
Reply to  Jin_Tonic

That one thing wrong, actually two that have been pointed out here, is actually a very big deal. For all of these great writers, who exposed the corruption, the double standards, the endless wars all for profit, the manufactured consent necessary for all of those things to continue, they “missed” the two big things that ensure all that corruption not only continues, but gets ever more powerful. That does indeed outweigh any good deeds these individuals have done.

By either ignoring the big lies, or worse yet, ridiculing them as nothing to worry about at all, these individuals ensure the rot continues. They also help ensure that any discussion of said rot be kept within strict confines, enough debate to seem real, but fully ignoring the real rot that will only grow by their willful avoidance of fully discussing it. Chomsky was completely correct about that manufactured consent, how it works and just what it accomplishes. Funny he and many like him “missed that” when it really counted, isn’t it?

Jin_Tonic
Jin_Tonic
Jan 15, 2024 3:20 PM
Reply to  Lizzyh7

How old was he during covid..? and was he even sane enough to write.?
He looked really really really old and fragile when I last saw a video of him and that was well before covid and I betcha he was on meds.

Paul
Paul
Jan 13, 2024 6:49 AM

Controlled op. Next!

Johnny
Johnny
Jan 12, 2024 10:32 PM

Perhaps it’s the case that like most journalists, John simply deferred to science and medicine. They were outside his scope of understanding and research he was too busy chasing other evils.

This probably applies even more to ageing journalists who are taking medication and following doctors orders and therefore feeling the vulnerability of old age.

To rage against Big pHarmer and its enablers would have ‘sullied’ his history of fearless reporting in the eyes of his contemporaries.

Rest in (conditional) peace John.

mgeo
mgeo
Jan 13, 2024 6:30 AM
Reply to  Johnny

Assassination or enslavement has become simple with modern medicine. Hardly anyone needs to know.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
Jan 13, 2024 10:27 AM
Reply to  mgeo

i’ve been wondering, generally, how many people take some form of anti depressants/anxiety drugs and how much that helps enslave them/follow the ”plan”.

NickM
NickM
Jan 13, 2024 3:19 PM
Reply to  sabelmouse

At least 10% take some form of Anti-Anxiety Drug. These drugs are not only addictive through the normal biochemical mechanism of binding onto known receptors in the brain, but also through a tricky psychological mechanism: Even normal people after taking Anti-Anxiety drugs begin to develope Anxiety upon withdrawal.

Hence medics tend to keep their patients on drugs rather than risk this tricky “recurrence of Anxiety” by trying to wean patients off them: a Nice Little Earner for drug companies.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
Jan 13, 2024 4:31 PM
Reply to  NickM

of course.

sabelmouse
sabelmouse
Jan 13, 2024 10:25 AM
Reply to  Johnny

one also needs to chose one’s battles.

Veri Tas
Veri Tas
Jan 12, 2024 10:03 PM

One of the issues closest to John Pilger’s heart was the treatment of Palestinians. His documentary film Palestine is Still the Issue is more topical than ever … but not a word about this documentary or in the comments.

NickM
NickM
Jan 13, 2024 3:28 PM
Reply to  Veri Tas

Thank you for reminding us of another of Pilger’s many virtues.

“The evil that men do lives after them
The good is oft interred in the grave”. — Julius Caesar.

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
Jan 14, 2024 3:36 AM
Reply to  NickM

Everything is Futile

11. There is no remembrance of those who came before, and those yet to come will not be remembered by those who follow after.…

All respect for Caesar, but…..someone elses had already been there done that.
So no matter what we do, nobody will ever be remembered. Sad but true.

NickM
NickM
Jan 14, 2024 4:18 PM
Reply to  Erik Nielsen

“Sad but true.”

Not so sad, and not quite true: there is a tiny time slot say, 1000BC to 2000AD, from which we joyfully remember some great names:

Zarathustra, Abraham, Homer, Sappho, Pythagoras, Plato, Confucius, Buddha, Archimedes, Yeshuah, Euclid, Ptolemy, Al’Garizma, Dante, Shakespeare, Galileo — which brings us into modern times when a cloud of ephemeral names multiply and perish like Mayflies.

How long will the sound of these few really great names continue to resound — footsteps in the canyon of Time — who knows? But we hear them.

les online
les online
Jan 12, 2024 8:46 PM

The bombing of Yemen by the latest Coalition of the Willing (Cows)
– a distraction from Israel being called to account at the International
Court of Justice…
Bombings Make Better Teevee…

NickM
NickM
Jan 13, 2024 3:25 PM
Reply to  les online

Scott Ritter’s opinion on this latest version of the Coalition’s 10 year bombing of Yemen:

“Terminal stupidity. Do you think the Houthi are going to give in because Coalition planes now have U$ pilots instead of Saudi pilots?”

https://youtu.be/GJMupFa2L0s?si=8i58cUUWf0aurJYs

mgeo
mgeo
Jan 14, 2024 4:38 AM
Reply to  NickM

Also keep in mind:
-. Most of the petroleum from Yemen is still being stolen by “rebels” and laundered through UAE.
-. If we add the petroleum stolen from Iran (on the high seas), Iraq and Syria, I wonder how much of the petroleum market that makes up.
-. The big approved producers all want Venezuela (which has the largest reserves) kept out of the market.

Thom Crewz
Thom Crewz
Jan 13, 2024 10:52 PM
Reply to  les online

Bombings Make Better Teevee…

Or….”Bomb Back Better”

gordan
gordan
Jan 12, 2024 8:46 PM

he worked for carlton tv mossad man michael greene a friend of thatchers
thatcher paedo enabler run by victor roth the 3rd or was it the 4th man of cambridge

he pilger shared an office with david cameron who would go off to south africa with
david kelly collecting nuke bombs and race kill chemi culls for israel tel aviver
he pilger took the mossad mi5 monies for his 5 story townhouse a good life for some
spy craft is complex

in old days actor where called kingsmen queensmen

give me walsingham and lovely christopher marlowe any day over this post modern zio satanick distemper

george bernard shaw
george bernard shaw
Jan 12, 2024 7:10 PM

I wonder why there is no false flag, false dichotomy, they-are-all-in-it-together assertions in this article. It seems rather straightforward: good guy vs. bad guys.

moneycircus
moneycircus
Jan 12, 2024 6:57 PM

A touching memorial.

Since Panama is mentioned, the documentary The Panama Deception is a must. It supports Daniel Broudy’s comments.

My latest for what it’s worth: The West’s Answer To Genocide Case: Bomb Yemen

Jin_Tonic
Jin_Tonic
Jan 13, 2024 12:05 PM
Reply to  moneycircus

Good read.

colin the iltrate
colin the iltrate
Jan 12, 2024 6:00 PM

i was disapointed with his covid stance but it doesnt take away from his previous great work

colin the iltrate
colin the iltrate
Jan 12, 2024 5:39 PM

he was all over the place durring covid one minute he was opossing lockdown next minute saying it dident go far enough i think hes hero worship of china was the main problem and his age and fear of catching it i notice with a lot of elderly lefttys fear just got the better of them

Hemlockfen
Hemlockfen
Jan 12, 2024 5:38 PM

Nancy said it best on J6.

Defending the Capitol with Guardsmen from pissed off voters who are convinced the election was stolen would have been bad optics.

They knew what was coming and they are using it for political gain. Evil. Pure evil.

Optics. Anything to hold onto power.

The information containment system is overflowing with truth. Like an overflowing bathtub with a stuck drain stopper and a broken faucet valve that can’t be turned off.

They want to seize our guns for a reason.

We know.

And they know we know.

NickM
NickM
Jan 12, 2024 4:47 PM

Browdy’s description of what he saw (and smelt) in Panama after U$ President Bush’s great victory over Noriega reminds me of what we see in Gaza after Israeli Prime Minister NathanYahoo’s great victory over Hamas. A similar stench has been reported.

No wonder the U$ regime is the only country in the world which supports genocide by Israel (using U$ F** aircraft supplied free to fire-bomb women and children).

TRT
TRT
Jan 12, 2024 3:41 PM

“whether belonging in a world of lies should be something citizens should ever tolerate.”

It shouldn’t be tolerated. Which is why the fearless need to speak out against the most monstrous lies like 9/11 and Covid rather than accepting them without question.

Jonathan K X
Jonathan K X
Jan 12, 2024 5:19 PM
Reply to  TRT

“Accepting [the lies] without question” would have been an innocent mistake, but I suspect he was repeating them even though he was well aware that they were lies. That’s really much, much worse.

TRT
TRT
Jan 12, 2024 5:51 PM
Reply to  Jonathan K X

Definitely

moneycircus
moneycircus
Jan 12, 2024 7:12 PM
Reply to  TRT

That is how most of the media operates – one’s tolerance for lies in return for a pay cheque.

Carl S. Berg
Carl S. Berg
Jan 12, 2024 3:12 PM

From Popbitch today:

Better known for his investigative journalism, film-making and campaigning, obituaries to John Pilger didn’t make much of his talents as a winemaker – and with good reason.

Many years ago, John invited a bunch of friends out to his house in Italy. They were sitting on the patio, opening a bottle, when John announced “That’s my vineyard at the end of this garden. The wine you are drinking comes from there.”

“Hmmm,” said one of his cattier friends, taking a sip. “Doesn’t travel well, does it?”

NickM
NickM
Jan 12, 2024 5:09 PM
Reply to  Carl S. Berg

As an amateur winemaker I suspect that “one of his cattier friends” was doing a bit of one-upmanship. It is surprisingly easy to make a simple and enjoyable brew from grapes and many other fruit juices.
Two of my friends in England made delicate elder wine; one of them won a prize. I would like a second opinion on the acceptabilty of Pilger’s home brew.

Like violin snobbery (from $200 to $20M) there is a wide range of wine snobbery with infinitesimal differences between grades.

Tom Larsen
Tom Larsen
Jan 12, 2024 2:38 PM

I was a fan of John Pilger for many years – until he I found out that he supported the Covid Narrative TM. A topic the author studiously avoids…

NickM
NickM
Jan 12, 2024 5:12 PM
Reply to  Tom Larsen

Nobody’s perfect.

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
Jan 12, 2024 5:49 PM
Reply to  Tom Larsen

Bad bad Pilger. Only because of one single error the entire global vaccinated population turned their back on you. Anything you did, all your books and papers you wrote was in vain and will be burned in the lake of fire and forgotten.

See, how easy it to be completely forgotten by just one single wrong foot step.
Bad bad Pilger, you will be remembered only for that!  😣 

As the Lord says: “You will not be judged for what you did, but for what you did not! …………………..LOL. That joke is so fnny sht………LOL.

colin the iltrate
colin the iltrate
Jan 12, 2024 6:15 PM
Reply to  Tom Larsen

he dident completly support it he seemed from his tweets to change his mind a lot i think he knew deep down lockdown was wrong but at the same time he was frightend

gordan
gordan
Jan 12, 2024 8:30 PM
Reply to  Tom Larsen

i do not recall
i do not remember
it is so very vague now
what he said on the subject of
israel arts project
the A team the B team
and gelatine.
moving urban systems
rabbi dov zacheim

or the chances of 3 buildings falling in perfect tamoodick kabbala chabad symetry into
own foot print.

we are all defined by the blood ritual that was the 9 and 11.

had pilger or fisked even heard of michael collins piper or christopher bollyn

Willem
Willem
Jan 12, 2024 1:59 PM

(Also placed in another thread, but now on topic)

Pilger said: ‘I am, by inclination, anti-authoritarian and forever sceptical of anything the agents of power want to tell us. It is my duty, surely, to tell people when they’re being conned or told lies.’

Yet he was silent in 2020…

Here is a quote I stole from his website that seems apt, written in 2003:

‘When truth is replaced by silence,” said the Soviet dissident Yevgeny Yevtushenko, “the silence is a lie.”

Pilger was totally silent when his friend Chomsky wished the unvaccinated dead and his other friend Roger Waters called the lockdown a necessary evil. Actually he was silent throughout the entire covid period. And now he is dead. How should we remember him?

Maybe he was silent because of old age, but then Pilger still had the time in 2020-2023 to talk about his favorites: the atomic bomb, Julian Assange, the imperial power of the USA and all that other stuff that is sooo 2019. It was as if he missed THE event of his life time. One wonders what other stuff he has missed through his life, and what readers (like me) have missed by reading his essays and seeing his documentaries and interviews.

I remember him for a quote he shared from Vonnegut, written in the sixties but very apt to contemporary society

How’s the patient? [the colonel] asked.
“Dead to the world.”
“But not actually dead.”
“No.”
“How nice – to feel nothing, and still get full credit for being alive.”

In hindsight it becomes quite cynical, but this also from Pilger:

They won’t say . . .” wrote Bertolt Brecht in “In Dark Times”, “. . . when the great wars were being prepared for . . . they won’t say: the times were dark. Rather: why were their poets silent?”

RIP

Sam - Admin2
Admin
Sam - Admin2
Jan 12, 2024 2:07 PM
Reply to  Willem

Scathing but, some might say, fair. Good comment, thanks. The final quote and your sign off gave me the chills. A2

Robert Stuart
Robert Stuart
Jan 12, 2024 2:45 PM
Reply to  Willem

John Pilger, 29 November 2022: “China-bashing is in full cry. China’s covid zero tolerance has problems, but the truth is it has saved an enormous number of lives. In China 5,233 have died from Covid. In the US, 1,104,836 have died. In Britain, the govt sent thousands of elderly to their deaths. Whose freedom?” https://twitter.com/johnpilger/status/1597381227237232640

ChairmanDrusha
ChairmanDrusha
Jan 12, 2024 4:17 PM
Reply to  Robert Stuart

I knew he was onboard with the COVID narrative, but even as late as Nov 2022? A real sullied legacy. There truly are no heroes.

TRT
TRT
Jan 12, 2024 4:36 PM
Reply to  ChairmanDrusha

I remember reading an article from him around 2011 that went out of its way to repeat the 9/11 official story as fact. So his support for the official covid narrative didn’t surprise me in the least.

NickM
NickM
Jan 12, 2024 5:31 PM
Reply to  ChairmanDrusha

There are heroes but all heroes are flawed — even in Homer.

Bradley pointed out that Shakespeare could easily have provided happy endings for Hamlet and Othello simply by exchanging the Lead player.

Othello would not have waited a moment after hearing his father’s ghost before rushing off to kill his uncle.

Hamlet would have been to intelligent and too cynical to be deceived by fly Iago.

Their imperfection did not negate their heroism.

gordan
gordan
Jan 12, 2024 9:35 PM
Reply to  ChairmanDrusha

conky donk
i have a beak a big one a conk
they called me isaac at school owing to the hooter the schnooze.
as a result of that trauma i have a nose for these things
sorry not sorry but pilgers nose does not pass the smell test.
it is said that the good guys all seem to be actor in a play.
khazar divide and conquer
conker conk
13th triber

NickM
NickM
Jan 12, 2024 5:18 PM
Reply to  Robert Stuart

Don’t trust the inflated stats from EU$A countries. Even Sweden, though it ignored Lockdown, was obliged as a fully paid up member of the EU$A to provide fake high death rates.

Cloverleaf
Cloverleaf
Jan 12, 2024 4:06 PM
Reply to  Willem

Do you reckon he was controlled op then?

brianborou
brianborou
Jan 12, 2024 5:32 PM
Reply to  Willem

Unlike many who are critical of Pilger behind the safety of their computer screens, he actually placed his life in mortal physical danger to report events which the legacy media wished to remain hidden.

John Pilger: A life telling truth to power | Middle East Eye

As to his faults ” Let he without sin cast the first stone ” John 8:7

Tom Larsen
Tom Larsen
Jan 12, 2024 10:38 PM
Reply to  brianborou

Sure, but Pilger like Chomsky, like all the others, missed the biggest one of all.

Production Unit 8052
Production Unit 8052
Jan 13, 2024 1:20 AM
Reply to  Tom Larsen

Most of the “legacy Left” ‘shit the bed’ over the COVID op and continue down that path blithely.. A massive failure which has done untold damage. Even while their own comrades suffer from injection side-effects.

I had a front seat view of this personally and it was telling and nauseating, although not, in retrospect, surprising.

Production Unit 8052
Production Unit 8052
Jan 13, 2024 1:32 AM

https://real-left.com/new-years-revolutions-what-is-to-be-done-in-2024/:

Don’t expect anything from the legacy Left. It’s a busted flush. They flunked their big moment, collaborated with the ruling class over covid and rendered themselves irrelevant for eternity.

Aethelred
Aethelred
Jan 13, 2024 10:49 AM

They perceived some sort of signal that the fake virus was a culmination of the long march, that public health would topple the class enemies and bring about the revolution at last.

Brianborou
Brianborou
Jan 13, 2024 8:39 AM
Reply to  Tom Larsen

To hide behind a computer screen and be critical of a man who put his life on the
line to give voice to the death plus suffering of the : Vietnamese, Cambodians and right up to his death the continuing eradication of the Palestinians plus many other people’s, reminds me of this “ Why do you look at the speck of sawdust in your brother’s eye and pay no attention to the plank in your own eye? “

Matthew 7:3-5

ariel'
ariel'
Jan 12, 2024 9:28 PM
Reply to  Willem

We’re not, we just have NO MSM access, publicity or financial backing.

Maxwell
Maxwell
Jan 13, 2024 12:50 AM
Reply to  Willem

Willem brings the straight truth.

George Mc
George Mc
Jan 13, 2024 10:13 AM
Reply to  Willem

“sooo 2019”

I like that. But even before The Mighty Covid, did Pilger EVER express the slightest scepticism over 9/11?

I understand the argument about us chickens hiding behind anonymity whilst Pilger et al are putting their reputations on the line etc. But mention of “reputation” should make us pause since it has an echo of the old dog leash tightening around the public reporter’s throat. They all know that there is only so far they can go. And – it has to be said – perhaps there even some restraints that have to be made. But we should always be aware of the tension involved i.e. that any system of censorship is open to abuse.

And I figure it like this: If I was a “fearless reporter” and also honest and I found out that there was a certain area where I dare not tread then I would seriously consider chucking the whole thing in and becoming a janitor or something. Because to continue as the “fearless reporter” but privately acknowledge that I have to avoid certain areas would make me not only a fraud but a vital prop of the system. Perhaps even the most important and dangerous prop – because my “fearlessness” would then act as a cover to justify state propaganda.

And it is precisely the most recent and most currently important parts of the propaganda which are the ones most “fenced off” and forbidden to the “fearless reporters”.

TRT
TRT
Jan 13, 2024 3:39 PM
Reply to  George Mc

You nailed it in the second last paragraph. Why bother if you are expected to defend or at least ignore the biggest lies? Unless your main motivation is status and fame. When you have a reputation as a fearless truth-teller that you help encourage, maintaining silence on some of the worst crimes, or even defending the lies, makes you complicit.

Matt
Matt
Jan 12, 2024 1:35 PM

Damned sad news.
I had no idea.
Damn.