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UK Local Election Propaganda: “Significant Losses for Both Sides”

The local elections have been a complete disaster for the Tories. They have lost over 1100 seats (as of 7pm today). They have lost nearly forty councils. They have been destroyed. It’s a humiliation.

However, if you just read the headlines, you might not get this impression.

The BBC has gone with this:

The Financial Times went with:

Pressure Mounts on May and Corbyn over Brexit deal: Tories and Labour suffer losses

The Guardian likewise is misrepresenting the situation, with an even stronger focus on Labour: Their headline points out Labour’s “heavy losses”, there’s a Freedland opinion piece criticising Labour and even a special write-up about Labour losing control of Bolsover council.

Just for a quick reality check, here are the actual results:

Have Labour gained a whole bunch of seats? No. But the media effort to conflate Labour’s minor losses with the complete trouncing the Conservatives have taken is totally dishonest.

Especially bearing in mind the disparity in press coverage – Labour routinely have smear campaigns run against their members and their leadership, including fresh (preposterous) allegations of “antisemitism” the DAY BEFORE the polling for these seats.

This is nothing new. Last year the local elections were portrayed as total defeat for Labour, despite making gains and winning 80% of the mayoral elections. The gains “were not big enough” and Corbyn was “humiliated”. If this was a humiliation for Corbyn….what on Earth is today for Theresa May?

The propaganda on this issue is two-fold, it’s not just minimizing the Tory losses to attack Corbyn’s labour, it’s also attempting to turn the UK into a one-issue nation. Every vote cast, the media tell us, was cast by people thinking about Brexit. Labour’s “heavy losses” are allegedly because of remain voters flocking to the Lib Dems or Green party.

This doesn’t even hold water in the media’s own narrative – Bolsover council, which the Guardian choses to focus on, has slipped from Labour control into a stalemate. Bolsover voted 70% for Leave.

The Tory government, and the craven local councillors, have increased poverty, increased homelessness, cut social care, cut unemployment, cut the NHS, cut everything. Police are down, crime is up. The rich and mega corporations refuse to pay their taxes without censure, whilst 10% of the country is being hit with council tax bills they literally cannot afford to pay.

Have some people voted against the Tory’s because they want to remain? Of course. But more than that, the Tories are the party of brutal austerity, declining living standards, desperation, poverty and a return to a quasi-Victorian social divide.

The people hate them, and if the press would do their duty and hold power to account, then this electoral embarrassment could have been even greater.

Filed under: featured, latest, media watch, Other Media, UK

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Kit Knightly is co-editor of OffGuardian. The Guardian banned him from commenting. Twice. He used to write for fun, but now he's forced to out of a near-permanent sense of outrage.

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bob
Reader
bob

You’ve all forgotten dear Vince – he’s won the cup don’t ya know and has qualified for next season’s Champions League!!

barovsky
Reader

Have you guys watched this? Two years old

Jeremy Bernard Corbyn ‘What Was Done’ *HQ Official*

mohandeer
Reader

Haven’t got much to say but did notice that the Greens, who under Bennett especially were very anti Israel and Zionism, have in fact made the greatest gains. Just an observation which I concluded was a strong message to the establishment that many voters are “against” Israel and “for” the planet. Also I am a remainer and voted Labour, so don’t quite understand how certain individuals might claim the Labour losses are due to Brexit. Whilst I might despise the EU I loathe the Washington regime even more and as previously I will protest any TPA the US userers want… Read more »

harry stotle
Reader
harry stotle

“The Tory government, and the craven local councillors, have increased poverty, increased homelessness, cut social care, cut unemployment, cut the NHS, cut everything. Police are down, crime is up. The rich and mega corporations refuse to pay their taxes without censure, whilst 10% of the country is being hit with council tax bills they literally cannot afford to pay.” – true, but surely all of this pales into insignificance when compared to the horrors of media invented antisemitism, or the fact Labour is over run with extremists wanting to reassert the post-war settlement, or who fail to embrace all aspects… Read more »

Tsar Nicholas
Reader
Tsar Nicholas

The Tories won 3,564 seast to Labour’s 2,021 last Thursday, and the projected national vote share was 28% each. Labour losts eats they managed to win on the day they disastrously lost the Ed Miliband general election in 2015.

Brexit is unravelling both of the main parties and I wouldn’t even bet a fiver on JC being leader of the largest party after the next GE.

George Cornell
Reader
George Cornell

The parallels between politics in the UK and in the US, the spins, the parties, the mealymouthed prevarication of the press and the affiliations of the main players becomes more and more striking.

harry stotle
Reader
harry stotle

Absolutely, and a key dilemma at the heart of the Brexit convulsions, as I see it.

A: Brexit – although this choice theoretically offers greater scope for democracy, in reality it delivers what’s left of our infra structure to US corporations and their right wing allies in Albion, who, like hyenas, will feast on whatever scraps are left by the US lions.

B: Remain – although this choice theoretically offers short term economic, and logistical stability in reality it cede what’s left of national self-determination to banking fiat or the whim of unaccountable bureaucrats in Brussels.

George Cornell
Reader
George Cornell

From the outside, the shameful invasion and rendering poodling to the Americans does not shed soft flattering light on any national self-determination. Invasion monkeying seems a low aspiration bar. As was widely reported, the American military envies the GCHQ which does things they “could never get away with”. Why tie your wagons to a decaying amoral Empire? Leaving will indeed force you further into the tentacles of a country which will not have your best interests at heart and will use and abuse you as long as you give them the respect they cannot get from anyone else. Of course… Read more »

bevin
Reader
bevin

“…although this choice theoretically offers greater scope for democracy, in reality it delivers what’s left of our infra structure to US corporations and their right wing allies in Albion”
A very good definition of the meaning of the term ‘defeatism.’

milosevic
Reader
milosevic

-1027 -72 +556 -32 +151 +210 = -214

Shouldn’t the number of seats gained and lost add up to zero?

barovsky
Reader

As for Labour, the political editor of TalkRadio quite rightly points out that – “Jeremy Corbyn is set to have lost more than 400 Labour councillors in four years. That may make him the worst performing leader of the opposition at local elections for 40 years.” Anyone who thinks Labour didn’t so do bad – wake up.

Local Elections : MSM Nonsense – and the real message for politicians

https://truepublica.org.uk/united-kingdom/local-elections-msm-nonsense-and-the-real-message-for-politicians/

bevin
Reader
bevin

A lot of those local councillors are officials that the Labour Party could do without. Many of them represent everything that Labour is fighting against, from austerity to imperialist sympathies.
Take Glasgow, for example.

Francis Lee
Reader
Francis Lee

The centre-left, which includes the Labour Party, SPD, PSOE, PS, PASOK as well as the US Democrats have sold the pass. The ideology of this group of piecemeal reform from within has been swept aside by the neo-liberal counter-revolution. It’s time has gone. It is now in thrall to the neoliberal/neoconservative ascendancy. It is part of the problem, not the solution. Social-democracy in the advanced economies after the crash of 2008 had long been neutered; erstwhile social-democratic parties had become cheerleaders for financial deregulation. Rump lefts had failed to grow in thirty years; late-90s alter-globo movements seemed to have been… Read more »

Frankly Speaking
Reader
Frankly Speaking

A new type of opposition possibly Parliamentary, extra-Parliamentary or both must emerge with a Will to Power

No thanks, I’d rather work on fixing social democracy than opening to the doors to another Stalin or Hitler.
There really is no other way, human history is littered with the corpses caused by extreme politics.

bevin
Reader
bevin

As I mention in my reply to Big B below you miss the point. The Labour Party that you so enjoy talking about is in the process of transformation into a democracy. In its previous incarnations Labour has always been dominated by an almost feudal leadership. In this New Labour differed only superficially, and for the worse, from the old Labour of MacDonald, Attlee and Wilson, all of them ‘top down’ parties dominated by bosses. For the first time in its history Labour is now becoming democratic. And, for its pains, it is chastised as being unchanging: its doom long… Read more »

BigB
Reader
BigB

AS I mention in my reply to Bevin below: the Labour party represent the antithesis of democracy …as well as the depoliticised end of democracy. Not least over Brexit: which is post-democratic and Constitutionally High Treason. How did Labour’s democratic justice and universalism serve Julian Assange – when was deliberately depersoned on world press freedom day? Without press freedom – what is democracy? And, for reasons I go into, but can only really scratch the surface, until we all get up to speed on the risks to humanity …I am standing by my claim that, since the national climate emergency… Read more »

BigB
Reader
BigB

The teleology of a truly socialist party would be to absorb its own power superstructure, transversalising power to be distributed equally among the autonomous unity of a self-sovereign people …not its own perpetuation, as you say. No matter how long this takes. Which, coming from the four hundred year colonisation and capitalisation of consciousness – may well be a mighty long time. It is precisely the Nietzschian will to power that must be overcome. This leads to the immediate despotism of an Ubermensch and and Untermensch – the Master/Slave dialectic. And yes, this is a misreading of Nietzsche – but… Read more »

Ramdan
Reader
Ramdan

My apologies, BigB for trying to “summarize you”:

“the will to power is spurious conception, a culturally contrived linguistic fiction, and a statist constructivism in the service of its own statist power regime. It is not a natural or organic part of the processual consciousness …actively engaged in the continuum of living experiential. It is a post hoc invention that needs constant reaffirmation. Without incessant reification, it is literally nothing.”….
I could only add that not just that conception but in fact all concepts are essentially spurious…all of them are unnatural

BigB
Reader
BigB

Exactly: got it one. You cut the cultural Gordian Knot not be thinking about it…

…and not by not thinking about it.

Fair dinkum.
Reader
Fair dinkum.

Or, as Ken Wilber described it: the ‘Holographic Paradigm’
(Every tiny piece contains the All).
As in David Bohm’s ‘Wholeness and Implicate Order’

Francis Lee
Reader
Francis Lee

I mean ‘Will to power’ (wille zur macht) in the sense that a radical or revolutionary movement which means business; a movement that perforce is going to upset the apple-cart and not play by the rules set by the class enemy. A movement with a fundamentally different world-view from the status quo. Unfortunately our HM’s loyal opposition exhibits a Will to Surrender; a craving for respectability and acceptance by the PTB. Nietzsche puts it well. ”Is not the true questioner/inquirer totally indifferent to what the results of his enquirer may be? For when we inquirer are we seeking for peace,… Read more »

BigB
Reader
BigB

The very essence of Zen is to question more …to question more until the very process of questioning is exhausted. This is the problem of common sense – we desperately need uncommon sense. Every element and hidden truth parameter of the culturally acquired knowledge system is a heresy, and its linguistic reification needs to be questioned …until it disappears. Reality is nondual and cannot be interrogated via dualism. This is the basis of the Cartesian Error Protocols. There are no answers: it is the answering itself that is the problem. Especially when the answers become cherished beliefs. To answer is… Read more »

Mucho
Reader
Mucho

People are hypnotised and indoctrinated by forces of evil who know exactly what they are doing and how to manipulate the masses. Bill Hicks made the point that our institutions are no longer relevant. They are preventing our evolution. First step is to expose religion for what it is……fraudulent, man made, out dated systems of control which are still brainwashing children and ruining society to this day

G Renehan
Reader
G Renehan

Thanks. I enjoyed reading this.

BigB
Reader
BigB

Errata: that’s reification, not rectification. And that was the keyboard, not me!

Some Random Passer-by
Reader
Some Random Passer-by

“If my sons did not want wars, there would be none.” Gutle Schnaper. – Mayer Amschel Rothschild’s wife.

Wilmers31
Reader
Wilmers31

That’s what happens when you have a two-party-system. After power toggling backwards and forwards a couple of times – no delivery for the people displeases the people. Conditions keep deteriorating. People’s reactions are rejection of that power structure which does not do the trick, either by electing outsiders, TV stars, or fresh looking newcomers because they haven’t been coopted by the powers and moneys which rule from behind the curtain. They simply need to elect someone from outside that system. When the Wall fell in my hometown in 1989 we thought the world would improve. Instead we got more polarization,… Read more »

Dissidents_unite
Reader
Dissidents_unite

Wilmers31, what you say is true. However, we have, as the opposition in this country, a Leader in Jeremy Corbyn who has a clear vision and focus and yes, a costed Manifesto, on how to end Austerity, the housing shortage, the poverty etc. At the root of these policies is an equal distribution of wealth so the rich will be taxed as they should be not the paltry amount they pay today. The Labour Party currently pose a threat to the establishment because they have a Manifesto that will ring the badly needed changes in this country, will challenge US… Read more »

Fair dinkum
Reader
Fair dinkum

The problem with elections is that politicians get elected.
Politics is the sly game of expedience.
It’s a lose-lose situation for the proles.

Badger Down
Reader
Badger Down

Politicians are useless. In my country, gardeners are drafted into government for a three-year stretch.

George Cornell
Reader
George Cornell

Chauncey Gardeners?

John2o2o
Reader
John2o2o

“if the press would do their duty and hold power to account” Lol, well, there’s a first time for everything, I suppose. I can’t speak for others but I voted Lib Dem as in my locality they campaigned to save our few green fields. And Labour have been bragging about putting those hump on all of the streets in my city. A major turn off. Apparently the turnout was low, so I expect people are fed up with politicians: perhaps the sheeple are beginning to wake up to the fact that they are routinely lied to by that rabble. Lol,… Read more »

Badger Down
Reader
Badger Down

Since 2014, no-one has been caught speeding in my country. Every vehicle has a speed limiter.

mark
Reader
mark

“Anti Semitism” smears helpfully thrown in as a distraction.
That nauseating little turd Robinson quitting the Labour Party because of yes, you guessed it, “anti semitism.”
Another “anti Semitism” scandal because of a single reference to Rothschild in a book written years ago.

Francis Lee
Reader
Francis Lee

Yes, there was ONE reference to Rothschild – p.57 – and no reference to Jew, Jews, or Jewish throughout a book of nearly 400 pages. Moreover, J.A.Hobson along with his contemporary L.T.Hobhouse both wrote for the MANCHESTER Guardian. Both were affectionally referred to as ‘The 2 Hobs’ They were well liked by Guardian editor of the time, C.P.Scott.

George Cornell
Reader
George Cornell

And CP Scott was very Zionist-friendly.

harry stotle
Reader
harry stotle

Professor Sassons response to Freedland’s smear exposes the fascile nature of Freedlands logic. “The campaign about antisemitism in Corbyn’s Labour party is getting absurd (Corbyn urged to explain his praise for antisemitic book, 2 May). Hobson’s Imperialism: A Study has been taught for years in universities up and down the country (I taught it myself). No one has ever felt the need to highlight the 10 lines or so, in a book of 400 pages, which are antisemitic, but Corbyn was expected to do so. Anyone who had not heard of this text would be forgiven for thinking this is… Read more »

tom197482
Reader

The spin from BBC began almost as soon as the first results were declared – Tories and Labour “suffer heavy losses”. When I read that first thing this morning I assumed the losses were on a similar scale for both parties. Not so at all, even at that early stage. Now, with all the votes in, I’ve no idea how a total loss of less than a hundred council seats could be described as a “heavy loss”, disappointing as it might be for Labour not to pick up seats. Clearly this had all been in planning for days or weeks… Read more »

Capricornia Man
Reader
Capricornia Man

So the BBC’s headlines dissembled.

How very BBC!

Still, a minor indiscretion compared to its beat-up of the “antisemitism crisis” in Labour.

The BBC should be democratised or – if it cannot be – closed down.

Capricornia Man
Reader
Capricornia Man

Should have said ‘fake “antisemitism crisis”‘.

M Le Docteur Ralph
Reader
M Le Docteur Ralph

I agree, however what I also noticed was: FIRST practically no news coverage beforehand AIM low turnout RESULT turnout 36.3% down from 65% when the same seats were last contested on the same day as the general election Labour always does far worse on a low turnout SECOND The latest anti-semitism smear. Nick Robinson on the Today Programme gave the latest smear away when he asked why Corbin could not be bothered to look up Hobson on Wikipedia. The view history tab the on John A. Hobson page on Wikipedia shows that it was edited Icewhiz and Philip Cross between… Read more »

Dissidents_unite
Reader
Dissidents_unite

The Labour vote held up remarkably well I thought.

BigB
Reader
BigB

So we spin the spin? Into champagne socialist hopium? It is quite clear that the vote was an admonition of the dominant binary globalist war parties. Whether that be purely over Brexit is a matter of contention. Who knows the why, but volitional High Treason – from both parties – is volitional High Treason. Neither is fit to govern, and that seems to me to be the Zeitgeist …not the neoliberal polyarchical apologia. The government is not working. The government – as detailed in today’s UK Column News – is not the government. Mark Sedwill appears to be the government… Read more »

Dissidents_unite
Reader
Dissidents_unite

Big B you are talking about the current Tory Government. Labour under Corbyn offer an entirely different proposition and one this country badly needs: Redistribution of wealth and good old fashioned Keynsian economics. They are the only Party offering something completely different and are fit to Govern. Everyone can remember the Lib Dems coalition with the Cameron Tory Government – they aren’t fit to govern at all after that shambles – especially as they could have made a difference by voting against austerity.

Toby Russell
Reader
Toby Russell

Our leaders, all of them have betrayed us. Yesterday could be the tipping point for humanities independence. It probably won’t be, but it should be. (Above quote from a BigB reply below.) I doubt we’ll have a tipping point that evolves into a coherent direction for a while yet but would very much like to see something sensible begin to coalesce. To that end and seeing as I said “sensible”: Which non-controversial statements can be made that together suggest an imaginable vector for humanity that is, essentially, “None Of The Above”? How about, as a rough starting point: 1. Consumerism… Read more »

rogerglewis
Reader

Great to get some input from you Toby. “THE BEGINNING OF WISDOM IS TO CALL THINGS BY THEIR PROPER NAME.” ― Confucius This Blog by Toby Russel posits the ruling Elite, Hybridised Oligarchy call it what you will as a Danistocracy borrowed from Popp and Albrecht, http://thdrussell.blogspot.se/2011/12/from-here-to-there.html The medias role as the fourth Estate is brought center stage in this analysis with the Political Theater relegated to a role subservient to or co-mingled with the Main Stream media. This Speech , a rare one from Popp sets out much of what we need to do which could be summed up… Read more »

barovsky
Reader

From the Russell blog:

This movement isn’t about the 99% defeating or toppling the 1%. You know the next chapter of that story, which is that the 99% create a new 1%. That’s not what it’s about. What we want to create is the more beautiful world our hearts tell us is possible.

More platitudes

Toby Russell
Reader
Toby Russell

barovsky, I assume you mean the whole article linked to was a string of platitudes, because the quote you took from it, being short and (probably almost verbatim) from Charles Eisenstein, can only really be a “platitude”, or at least nowhere near enough on its own. It is, as a simple observation, one of many to bear in mind in times as interesting as these. But the article Roger kindly linked to is an open-ended recounting of the “Plan B” put forward by the German outfit Wissensmanufaktur, a plan that has a lot to commend it, in my opinion. It… Read more »

rogerglewis
Reader

Toby you were well ahead of the curve in 2011 when you wrote that and I dare say you are still ahead of the curve now, probably not having stood still, or perhaps precisely by standing still and reflecting on the many viewpoints arriving and departing the set of ideas you so meticulously dissected on your ( and what remains one of my favorite) Blogs. Not only your Writing but the comments and discussion. So long and thanks for all the fish ( another tall person wrote somewhere once) . The best I came up with was this Trilogy, still… Read more »

Toby Russell
Reader
Toby Russell

It’s funny you should say that! What you sketch here is something I’ve been building up myself, more or less. So yes, I’m interested in joining forces and will be in touch. It really is time for action…

crank
Reader
crank

The problem -as I see it – is connected to our capacity for emotional investment. People are emotionally invested in Corbyn’s leadership to such an extent that they have to ignore the contradictions, just as they are invested in the Greta story or the ‘XR’ story as ‘rebels with integrity winning against the odds’. So we see good people mischaracterise or dismiss rather than address the evidence that points to another reality. Not that I am saying that emotional investment is not a human thing. Maybe it’s the quintessentially human thing. ‘Tis not contrary to reason to prefer the destruction… Read more »

Toby Russell
Reader
Toby Russell

I favour open-minded skepticism that remains optimistic, that is not vulnerable to cynicism. We can train ourselves to identify then shed our beliefs, to learn only from the consequences of our decisions and responses to the world. To be scientific, in other words, but truly unattached to any particular outcome, while recognising the endeavour is for organic life, for the crazy richness and wildness of it all, and expressly not towards some mechanical-utopian ‘perfection’.

Keep fighting, but with love guiding our choices and improving our wisdom as we go.

BigB
Reader
BigB

Wise words. Wise words I would do well to emulate. Unfortunately, I have become attached to a particular outcome – survival. In no spurious way, I see that threatened by the dead-end narcissism of our leaders, and as the majoritarian ethos that is internalised by the led. We are reaching a tipping point whereby that uncritical and blinded acceptance on faith of, well, one man really. Because no other politician is trusted. The entire faith in the political establishment is in one man. Who would support a Tom Watson, or Jess Phillips led Labour party? No one, I hope. Then… Read more »

bevin
Reader
bevin

“Who would support a Tom Watson, or Jess Phillips led Labour party? No one, I hope. Then why support a Corbyn led Labour party. Apart from the political figurehead, they are exactly the same.” You miss the point. The Labour Party has, for the first time in its long history become very close to a democracy. New Labour (see Phillips and Watson above) was a self perpetuating oligarchy in which the PLP was selected by the leadership and then selected both leadership and policies. The Old Labour from which it evolved was dominated by bosses-Trade Unions with block votes, representing… Read more »

BigB
Reader
BigB

Bevin, we’ve been over this ground for over a year now. Everyone is responsible for their choices. If you form part of the constituency of consensus for a political organisation, you effectively hand your political autonomy and agency over to the party. Effectively you endorse and legitimate everything they do. No one can be in 100% accord, a bit of Realpolitik is unavoidable. Support of the labour party is support of the white helmets, regime change in Syria, NATO and its jihadis, the drang nacht oesten occupation of Europe …you know my list. I’ve posted it many times before. How… Read more »

Dissidents_unite
Reader
Dissidents_unite

Big B Hell, what are you on? You must live in a different country than me!

Toby Russell
Reader
Toby Russell

I don’t see what you wrote as being in disagreement with what I wrote. To me it reads like an agreement.

BigB
Reader
BigB

Sort of, my patience is wearing thin. I’ve essentially been saying the same thing for forty years. As, I’m sure you have. I’m running of of ways to say it nicely. The next few years will determine humanities fate. I’m not alone on that one. I do not feel that is unnecessarily melodramatic to say so. As we are talking, it looks from what Davidson said earlier that Corbyn and May are close to a collaborated Brexit deal – which is what I have suspected since he met Barnier and Verhofstadt a few months back. I see a few are… Read more »

Toby Russell
Reader
Toby Russell

From your earlier response: Which is an overlong apology, in order to say that I probably won’t be following your very good advice. A lot more people are going to have to stand up for what they believe. I always wanted to build a nice coalition of understanding, aligned for peace. That ain’t gonna happen. We are up against some of the most cynical people ever. Corbyn has crossed the Rubicon to join them. I have no idea why. Anyone uncritically following is crossing to the wrong side of humanities future. People need to wake up very fast as to… Read more »

BigB
Reader
BigB

Wobbly: I’m into my fourth week of a bronchitis, that is the worst I have had in my life. And that is not melodrama! So, I totally agree …but I am not quite feeling it at the moment. The events of this week have been a cold, hard, reality check. I’m sure you are up to speed on the XR ‘exponential’ rebellion, etc. Hope and optimism were collectively rekindled this week …at last, we are doing something about the climate. Not enough, some say …but at least we are doing something. There has been little but blanket endorsement …finally, we… Read more »

Toby Russell
Reader
Toby Russell

I’ll start with your closing comments: I’m not a party-political animal. I thoroughly distrust the system as it stands but do understand that any system that dominates, let’s say, a planetary-ish culture generates a lot of ‘value’ that attracts a lot of ‘bad’ people towards it. It also has massive momentum and power to influence, seeing as we are social animals. It can’t be any other way. Corruption is an ever-present and corrosive reality that does not care about left-right differences. Hopping back to earlier in your reply: I expect to be treated with whatever it takes to end me… Read more »

BigB
Reader
BigB

I’ve read nearly 200 pages of the CCC, which is not easy. It is pure fantasy. It is fantastical enough that the committee, the Royal Society, and Imperial College – the main research contributors – can actually think this can work. It is worse than even Robin and Cory could have imagined. They want to take gas – which we do not have – and convert it into hydrogen …to set up a whole hydrogen economy – running our energy, transport, and heating systems. That is fantasy. It becomes double fantasy when we either import the gas as LNG, or… Read more »

crank
Reader
crank

I’ve read nearly 200 pages of the CCC Fuck ! That is honourable and slightly insane, if you don’t mind me saying BigB. I guess the split in the eco-world has always been there, although less apparent than at this juncture. Although I was too young to really grasp the details, I remember it as seeming obvious 30years back that only a full scale, global revolution stood the chance of averting the worst. [sarc] Now we are there! I am fully behind the revolutionary vanguard of David Attenborough, George Monbiot, Christiana Figueres, Bono, Bill Gates, George Soros and the rest.… Read more »

BigB
Reader
BigB

Well, I’ve been laid up again. I went back to work too soon. The M$M just did a glib analysis: we just do this and this and we meet ‘net zero’. Driving: no problem, Crack on with 2-3 cars per household. Just switch to EVs and FCEVs by 2030. 12.5 million of them. HGVs => hydrogen HGVs. Flying => no worries, synfuel and biofuel. Heathrow gets a new runway. We can still have open cast mining in Northumberland. Just eat a little less meat and maybe cycle a bit more. That’s it: climate sorted …nothing to see – just carry… Read more »

M
Reader
M

BIGB

Why do you keep banging on about hydrogen, nuclear and geosequestration?

Hydrogen is an energy sink – check the laws of thermodynamics
Nuclear – what about the waste?
Geosequestration – unfeasible and a corporate ploy to create a legal structure to bury nuclear waste

BigB
Reader
BigB

Why do I keep banging on about them? For exactly the reasons you say. The CCC – which is clearly going to be a policy focus document, to become the basis of the major energy strategy of the UK in the next Parliament. That is, it will be implemented in some form by either of the major parties (no one is expecting the LibDims to win a GE). Its implementation commits us to a neoliberal imperialist energy strategy up to 2050. It commits us the (free) market principles, hidden subsidies, and hidden debt – mainly up front as debt financing… Read more »

m
Reader
m

BIGB

My apologies, I misinterpreted your original comment and thank you for such a comprehensive reply.

In my own case I bailed out of dodge over 30 years ago as I witnessed the writing on the wall.

These days I am not up to speed on what is really happening on the ground in the UK other than being a fervent supporter of the good guys down at UK Column.

Cheers

Archie1954
Reader
Archie1954

Now let’s turn the community elections into the same result for the national elections.

Philip
Reader
Philip

Who lost over 500 seats? Only the Tories

barovsky
Reader

My error, apologies. It was a number I picked up earlier today. Labour have actually lost 77 seats but the results are very revealing, aside that is from the awful lib-dems who probably would have voted Tory (I thought they were dead?). It’s massive gains by the unidentified, 656 seats gained and 192 to the Greens. So clearly the electorate are sick and tired of the same old shit, though they’ll get a good dose from the lib-dems.

Unless there’s a radical break with this ancien regime, we’re doomed I tell you, dooomed!

KarenEliot
Reader
KarenEliot

Skewered the mainstream spin right there.

How a party that loses about 4 or 5 % of its seats can in any way be equated with one that has haemorrhaged one quarter of its councillors is just simple outright lying. Not that I hold any truck with either of them.

The key lesson seems to be that the liberals are the protest vote choice, plus ca change…

Good luck with the website move OffG

mark
Reader
mark

No, no, 90 is very nearly the same as 1,330.

Philip
Reader
Philip

We can never forget LibDem treachery in supporting a Tory government

rogerglewis
Reader

very sheepish about turnout as well. I think its been pretty low but can not as yet track down official figures.

mark
Reader
mark

Apparently there were a colossal number of spoiled ballot papers.

barovsky
Reader

Unfortunately, they don’t count spoiled ballot papers

Ken Kenn
Reader
Ken Kenn

I read the turnout around 30%. The Lib Dems have done well you can’t mask that but how many of the votes are lent? The LD’s won most seats where they were second to the Tories mainly in the Shires but Chelmsford was a big win alright. The big towns and Cities didn’t vote so it’s difficult to transfer vote share into a forecast of a GE result. Truth is though is that in a GE we would be discussing economic and social policy and not just theRemain/Leave part of the whole domestic agenda. The LD’s are still pro austerity… Read more »

Tsar Nicholas
Reader
Tsar Nicholas

Five million Labour voters in 2017 also voted to Leave. They now realise the extent of Labour’s betrayal, and they won’t be voting for JC4PM.

barovsky
Reader

I think the True Publica piece hit the spot:

As for Labour, the political editor of TalkRadio quite rightly points out that – “Jeremy Corbyn is set to have lost more than 400 Labour councillors in four years. That may make him the worst performing leader of the opposition at local elections for 40 years.” Anyone who thinks Labour didn’t so do bad – wake up.
https://truepublica.org.uk/united-kingdom/local-elections-msm-nonsense-and-the-real-message-for-politicians/

barovsky
Reader

Yeah but they haven’t been much better for Labour either, they’ve lost over 500 seats! The political system is broke, don’t try to fix it!

Maggie
Reader
Maggie

Oh Dear. How do you equate -72 with -500?

Redveg
Reader
Redveg

I think there’s more than a fair chance that most of the 72 seats lost by Labour in the local elections could have been saved, and gains made, if that party’s municipal politics were not so rotten. For years now, majority Labour councils, such as mine in Lewisham have cut, cut and cut again. The result has been a haemorrhaging of vital services for the borough’s most vulnerable, causing untold misery and privation. The problem has been that when push comes to shove, Labour locally jumps to the Tory call for austerity rather than stand firm behind the borough’s electorate… Read more »

barovsky
Reader

I think I explained it.