107

Open Wounds: Sweden Drops the Olof Palme Case

Binoy Kampmark

It’s the sort of thing that ruffled the image of a composed and tranquil existence. In some countries, doing away with political leaders is a periodic affair, deemed necessary to clean the stables. But in Sweden, change is barely discernible, stability nigh guaranteed and institutions revered. “It’s in the tradition of Sweden to put itself forth as a moral role model,” observes author Elisabeth Åsbrink.

Then came that thorny, troubling issue of Olof Palme.

Palme minted a reputation berating the bullying actions of great powers and forging an internationalist platform for progressive politics. He took issue with the crushing of the 1968 Prague Spring by the Warsaw Pact forces, apartheid in South Africa and US involvement in the Vietnam War.

As education minister in the Tage Erlander government, he marched alongside Sweden’s North Vietnamese ambassador in protest.

As Prime Minister, he gave an excoriating speech in 1972 likening the Christmas bombings of Hanoi with the destruction of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War and the Nazi death camp at Treblinka.

In an address to parliament on November 7, 1973, he reflected on the overthrow of Chile’s socialist president, Salvador Allende.

“The overthrow of a government elected by the people in Chile has raised the question of whether, in general, it is possible to carry out profound changes in a poor and unfair society without having privileged groups resorting to violence.”

He mocked the nuclear deterrent and praised striving efforts of the Third World, the latter earning him praise from Cuba’s Fidel Castro. On the domestic front, he remained a social democrat to an aggressive degree, bringing in universal day care, introducing legislation on workers’ rights, abortion and gender equality.

Such measures encouraged the haters, though many preferred operating in the shadows. On February 28, 1986, Palme and his wife Lisbet left a movie theatre located in downtown Stockholm. He had felt no need for a continued security presence. He was subsequently gunned down in his wife’s company at 11.21 pm, shot in the back by a Smith & Wesson .357 Magnum.

The scene of death saw witnesses aplenty – 23 in all – who could attest to seeing a man fire the shots and flee the scene via Tunnelgata alleyway. What followed was the interviewing, by police, of 90,000 people. Of that improbably large sample, 134 confessions for the murder were noted.

The list was subsequently trimmed to include, amongst others, Kurdish separatists. At the time, the rattled Stockholm police chief Hans Holmér ordered the raid of Stampen, a jazz club that led to the arrest of several Kurds. All were released for lack of evidence.

In the late 1990s, a captured former commander of the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) of Turkey, one Semdin Sakik, claimed ignorance about “the details of the assassination of Swedish prime minister Olof Palme” but insisted with unconvincing confidence that “this murder was committed by the PKK.”

PKK leader Abdullah Öcalan was supposedly peeved by the expulsion of eight members of the group from Sweden. “The operation to kill Palme was given the codename ‘wedding’ and the assassination command was given by Abdullah Öcalan [with the words] ‘Send him to his wedding’.” (The alleged assassins seemed to have had a sense of marital humour about them.)

In 1999, Turkish prosecutors took up this angle in the trial of Öcalan, who disabused notions that he was involved. But instead of clearing matters up, another tentative hypothesis was offered: that Palme had been slain by a hastily assembled splinter group, PKK Rejin. Back in Stockholm, sighs were registered.

The smorgasbord of suspects proved heavy and almost ludicrously well spread. Allegations of South African involvement were also, at stages, proffered. (To this can be added claimed Iraqi participation; the role of Chilean neo-fascist Roberto Thieme; the US Central Intelligence Agency and the German Red Army Faction.)

The Deep Search papers, prepared by General Tai Minnaar, designated Palme “enemy of the state”, and contained a list of individuals said to be involved in the decision making, planting and execution of the operation.

In January 2003, Agneta Blidberg, deputy director of the prosecuting service in Stockholm admitted to receiving the South Africn documents and instituting “certain steps and interrogations”. She refused to put any “value” on them, though a general sense that they were forgeries remained.

In South Africa, weighty figures such as Chris Thirion, former head of South Africa’s Military Intelligence (MI), thought otherwise. The Deep Search papers had a smell that refused to go away.

Former General Tienie Groenewald, head of South Africa’s National Intelligence Interpretation Branch when Palme was killed, was also convinced, going so far as to supply the Swedish aid worker Göran Björkdahl with names in Johannesburg during an October 1, 2015 meeting.

The initial field of suspects, filtered of all exoticism and danger, left the police with the petty criminal and derelict Christer Pettersson, continuously referred to in press notes as “an alcoholic and drug addict”. He was jailed for the killing and sentenced to life imprisonment on July 27, 1989. Crucial to the case was testimony from Lisbet Palme, who claimed she saw Pettersson gazing with glacial interest at her dying husband after the shooting. On appeal, he was acquitted. In the 1990s, prosecutors revisited the case that refused to go cold, keen to get back at Pettersson.

Palme’s case has continuously radiated with wild discussion and expansive theories, often with bewildering stretch. As Gunnar Pettersson wrote with continuing relevance in 1989:

Practically everything that is known is open to interpretation – particularly as regards the motive, since so many individuals and groups can be said to have had one.

The more these ideas persisted, the greater the suspicion about the competence of Sweden’s investigative authorities, allied to the troubling idea that right-wing elements in the Norrmalm District of the Stockholm Metropolitan Police and the Swedish Security Police (Säpo) were at work. (The fact that some thirty police were in the vicinity of the murder at the time is striking.) Ministers of Justice, public prosecutors and police investigators duly resigned.

Over the years, one man seemed to linger closer to home, the depressive “Skandia Man”, graphic designer and eventual suicide Stig Engström. He was at the scene at the time, even claiming to have made an effort to “resuscitate” Palme; he worked at Skandia Insurance, in proximity to the crime scene.

Interest was revived in 2018 with the investigative prodding of journalist Thomas Pettersson. Engström’s ex-wife, was unswayed. “He was too much of a coward. He wouldn’t harm a fly.”

As seems to be a tendency in high profile cases, the Swedish prosecutors do take their time. And time does get away.

Engström had moved up the list of favourite suspects but his death in 2000 made the continuation of proceedings more than just futile.

“Since he has died,” concluded chief prosecutor Krister Petersson, “I cannot indict him.” But it was Engström who had “acted how we believe the murderer would have acted.”

He had weapons training, been in the army, was a member of a shooting club, hated Palme and his views. Such evidence remained painfully circumstantial. While the prosecutors claimed they could muster enough to move it to trial, it was not necessarily sufficient to obtain a conviction. Obstacles remained: the inability to link, forensically, the murder with any weapon.

The conclusion to this investigation seemed egregiously dismissive, a slander on Palme’s life. Even Palme’s son Marten, in concluding that the prosecutors had drawn the right conclusion in closing the case, could claim some disappointment “that they didn’t have more conclusive evidence, like DNA or a weapon that they could trace to the crime.”

If failure to identify Palme’s killer remained Swedish society’s great “open wound”, as current Prime Minister Stefan Löfven described it, it is one that has been left tantalisingly unclosed.

Dr. Binoy Kampmark was a Commonwealth Scholar at Selwyn College, Cambridge. He lectures at RMIT University, Melbourne. Email: [email protected]

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mart
mart
Jun 29, 2020 8:34 AM

A book worth reading (however just in German so far): Im Spinnennetz der Geheimdienste: Warum wurden Olof Palme, Uwe Barschel und William Colby ermordet?
Baab, Patrik, Harkavy, Robert E.
 
It seems it might have to do a lot with international weapons trade which Palme wanted to stop from his country

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Jun 14, 2020 5:29 PM

We have to accept that each case must be proven on its own merit, by we must not be swayed by underhand official efforts to make us look the other way, such as the CIA’s promotion of the phrase conspiracy theory.
 
We are left with the crime. Not just the murders but the consequences of organized crime, corporatism, contiguous fascism that criss-crossed the Atlantic from 1930s America to Germany and back again, with assistance from a constellation of ruling classes in Latin America, Europe, Britain and Israel.
 
We have to tackle the crime. The perpetrators left plenty of evidence but we will not ‘get’ them. We can only identify, address and reverse their crime.
 

paul
paul
Jun 13, 2020 8:44 PM

The people who murdered Palme were the same people who murdered Bernadotte.

John A
John A
Jun 13, 2020 6:08 PM

‘shot in the back by a Smith & Wesson .357 Magnum’.
 
No, no murder weapon has been found and the bullets found at the scene were too badly damaged to identify what gun they came from. Only that they were .357 magnum. I watched the whole press conference. There is not motive, there is no identifiable means, all the latest suspect had was opportunity being near the scene of the crime and acting a bit strangely and fantasising/lying in his explanations to the police. He is as much a patsy as Lee Harvey Oswald. Either the police were totally incompetent or they had been ordered to lay off.

Howard
Howard
Jun 13, 2020 2:52 PM

Wonder if Sweden will ever be convicted for its role in the attempted murder of Julian Assange? Only if the government itself had instigated and carried out the murder of Palme would Sweden have a bigger stain on its moral stature than its treatment of Assange.

Charlotte Russe
Charlotte Russe
Jun 13, 2020 1:21 PM

CONTROLLED OPPOSITION
 
 
In the 20th Century approximately 30 world leaders were assassinated.   I bet in most cases those prosecuted for the crime were little more than Oswald-like patsies.  And this list doesn’t even include government leaders killed in mysterious plane crashes.
 
 One such political figure was Senator Paul Wellstone who died in a highly suspicious 2002 plane crash. “Wellstone’s death comes almost two years to the day after a similar plane crash killed another Democratic Senator locked in a tight election contest, and that was Missouri Governor Mel Carnahan, on October 16, 2000. 
 
Wellstone was in a hotly contested reelection campaign, but polls showed he was beginning to pull ahead of Republican nominee Norm Coleman, the former mayor of St. Paul, in the wake of the vote in the Senate to authorize President Bush to wage war against Iraq. 
 
The liberal Democrat was a well-publicized opponent of the war resolution, the only Senator in a tight race to vote against it. there are enormous financial stakes involved in control of the Senate. Republican control of the Senate would make it possible to push through new tax cuts for the wealthy and other perks for corporate America worth billions of dollars—more than enough of an incentive to commit murder.” The death of US Senator Paul Wellstone: accident or murder?
 
It would appear, politicians risk being murdered if they “genuinely” go against the grain remaining true to their beliefs and principles by deliberately using their power to jeopardize insidious ruling class lucrative schemes and scams.  By the way, this is how you know ALL the nonstop “resistance” against the orange buffoon is just utter bullshit. If Trump was a actually a threat to the military/security/surveillance/corporate state he would have already been JFK’d or Olof Palme’d.
 
The worldwide gangster ruling class is just like any other criminal organization which regularly eliminates anyone who has the power to alter the status quo. The security state like common mobsters use extortion or murder to get their way.  We all know about Herbert Hoover and his extortion files.  Hoover maintained a special official and confidential file in his office. The “secret files,” as they became widely known, guaranteed Hoover’s longevity as Director of the FBI. In fact, today those intelligence agency “dirty files” are even more extensive given the sophisticated and heightened nature of surveillance.  Funny, that gives the term “controlled opposition” a whole new meaning. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Gezzah Potts
Gezzah Potts
Jun 13, 2020 1:57 PM

You hit the nail on the head Charlotte. If Trump really was a genuine threat, they would’ve already got rid of him. It’s all one giant charade.
A Punch and Judy Show for the masses.
Find it quite startling the divisiveness in the United States, and those that I often come across who fervently believe that Trump or Qanon will save the United States and also lock up Obama, the Clinton’s, Soros, etc, etc. What can you say?
While reading your comment, four names popped into my head: Thomas Sankara, Patrice Lumumba, Maurice Bishop and Salvador Allende.
And we know what happened in Chile after Allende’s death. It became the test tube guinea pig for Neoliberalism.

Charlotte Ruse
Charlotte Ruse
Jun 13, 2020 3:47 PM
Reply to  Gezzah Potts

Yes it’s all showbiz…..

Antonym
Antonym
Jun 13, 2020 2:31 PM

Indeed, Hoover’s FBI was and is (Mueller) in as much dirty business as the CIA.
 
Untouchables in their life time only, not in History.

Howard
Howard
Jun 13, 2020 2:49 PM

One very small correction: you mean J Edgar Hoover.

Charlotte Ruse
Charlotte Ruse
Jun 13, 2020 3:50 PM
Reply to  Howard

Yes, thanks.

Frank Speaker
Frank Speaker
Jun 13, 2020 12:53 PM

Sweden was once fiercely neutral and social democrat. It was the pinnacle of human civilisation, a template to copy and aspire too, albeit imperfect as we humans are.
 
Sweden has shifted to the right since Palme’s assassination, is now on the verge of joining NATO, increasingly Russophobic, has opened its doors to unchecked migration which is decimating its culture, politics and safety of its indigenous people. These changes all point very clearly towards the cuplrit of Palme’s murder.

Arsebiscuits
Arsebiscuits
Jun 13, 2020 1:00 PM
Reply to  Frank Speaker

Swedenistan is fucked.

Waldorf
Waldorf
Jun 13, 2020 6:18 PM
Reply to  Frank Speaker

Yitzhak Rabin’s assassination served as a warning to any Israeli thought to be too conciliatory to the Palestinians. There is no mystery about the assassin himself, but how high up did the plot go?

acar burak
acar burak
Jun 13, 2020 10:46 AM

Off-G censors as well? :)))))

Frank Speaker
Frank Speaker
Jun 13, 2020 12:42 PM
Reply to  acar burak

If you don’t like it here, quit trolling and go elsewhere.

acar burak
acar burak
Jun 13, 2020 1:33 PM
Reply to  Frank Speaker

To Off-Off-G? Even the Guardian would not censor what I’ve said yesterday. I’m done with this place. Off-G!!! Try Little Guardian.

Howard
Howard
Jun 13, 2020 2:58 PM
Reply to  acar burak

It isn’t necessarily censorship. What happens – and it’s happened to me for very innocuous comments – is that if you post something when Off-G is clearly under attack, that comment may not get posted.
 
Consider that even government computers are subject to cyber attack. It’s a way of life – the dark (or perhaps the bright) side of the digital age.

acar burak
acar burak
Jun 13, 2020 3:16 PM
Reply to  Howard

Thank you, Howard. But it doesn’t seem like that. For the record (later to be censored as well): The whole discussion has been removed. And there’s no reply to my above comment from Off-G, but there’s from Frank Spear which is (ironically) the exact motto of the hardest right here, in Turkey. Besides, even my question is down-voted! That fascist’s is up-voted. Smells like sewage.
 

Admin1
Admin
Admin1
Jun 13, 2020 3:23 PM
Reply to  acar burak

Please try to be less abusive. What ‘discussion’ is this? I have no record of anything being deleted, and can’t see why it would have been unless it was racist or empty ad hom.

Was it either of these things?

acar burak
acar burak
Jun 13, 2020 4:20 PM
Reply to  Admin1

I was not abusive given the strange disappearance of the whole discussion, but anyway they’re up now. Thank you.

Admin1
Admin
Admin1
Jun 13, 2020 3:58 PM
Reply to  acar burak

Is this the thread? It’s just more of your unoriginal trolling aimed at convincing people we are ‘hard right’, even tho we are obviously not, but if it matters to you, rest assured it’s still there
 
https://off-guardian.org/2020/06/12/open-wounds-sweden-drops-the-olof-palme-case/#comment-190419

acar burak
acar burak
Jun 13, 2020 4:28 PM
Reply to  Admin1

I’ve criticized you as New Right, not ‘hard right’. And I’ve briefly talked about my reasoning when others asked. You may call whatever you dislike as trolling or unoriginal. No, it does not matter to me at all, I am only responsible for my behavior, not yours.

Harvey
Harvey
Jun 14, 2020 1:28 AM
Reply to  acar burak

I agree, I also think you are right they are alt-right.

acar burak
acar burak
Jun 14, 2020 2:34 AM
Reply to  Harvey

Thank you.

Даниела Тошева
Даниела Тошева
Jun 13, 2020 10:01 AM

Palme.Chile.Cia. (& GCHQ, Logic)
& still today…
a chronic coronary virus of any cultural rising belief-set.
Knowledge is power and there are those in high office who believe,
If you cannot own or control knowledge, then to kill is their prerogative…

Philpot
Philpot
Jun 13, 2020 8:47 AM

Having had some experience of South African security mindset, the idea of conducting an operation in Sweden is preposterous, but their occasional ‘ally’ may have found that concept a useful idea to float as a deflection of their own involvement. South Africans were introverted beyond the belief of most American or British spooks. “Leave me alone on my farm with my bible and biltong’ was about it. Arranging a murder in Stockholm unlikely to even register on the Boer consciousness.

Mike Ellwood
Mike Ellwood
Jun 13, 2020 3:16 PM
Reply to  Philpot

Really? They seem to have mounted a fairly active attack on Peter Hain, when he was a young anti-Apartheid campaigner who had come (from South Africa) to the UK.
 
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2009/jan/22/peter-hain-profile

Philpot
Philpot
Jun 13, 2020 8:40 AM

I think the elephant in the room here is who wasnt mentioned at all as a possible suspect. After all, who also murdered Gerald Bull?

Lysias
Lysias
Jun 13, 2020 2:54 PM
Reply to  Philpot

Wasn’t Palme a supporter of Palestine?

Philpot
Philpot
Jun 13, 2020 4:29 PM
Reply to  Lysias

My thinking exactly.

Antonym
Antonym
Jun 13, 2020 3:16 AM

The murder of a PM without anyone considering his protection & a strong motive?
Highly suspect: his own Swedish security top might be implicit. If he tells his security detail to go home, some of them should have hung back a dozen meters. Biggest motive: the CIA. Biggest interest not to find out the killer: the Swedish deep state.

Waldorf
Waldorf
Jun 13, 2020 5:34 AM
Reply to  Antonym

Quite possible. If your security team is in on it, you are doomed.

John A
John A
Jun 14, 2020 8:16 AM
Reply to  Antonym

Actually, Palme himself told his security team that they would not be needed that evening. He called them early evening before he and his wife went to a cinema, approximately a 30-40 minute walk from their apartment in Gamla stan. Of course, it is quite possible that the security forces/police were then fully aware that the Palmes would be walking unprotected to and from the cinema, the route would be obvious as would finding out what time the film ended. He was short about a 5-minute walk from the cinema. He is actually buried in a churchyard roughly halfway between the cinema and assassination point.

Harvey
Harvey
Jun 12, 2020 9:00 PM

The CIA’s war against socialism, or anything that serves the peoples interest has lasted 60 years now, and we see the results in the USA, the homelessness, the poverty and the desperation of a vast numbers of the population, and they haven’t finished yet, there are more people to fleece at home and overseas.
 
The USA is an empire that wants to reverse 500 years of popular emancipation and progress, and take the people back to squalor, slavery and feudalism. When history is written, not by them and their liars in Hollywood, it will remembered as one of the worst, most evil empires in history.

Даниела Тошева
Даниела Тошева
Jun 13, 2020 10:08 AM
Reply to  Harvey

Shine on Harvey & ‘moon’ them … 😉

Howard
Howard
Jun 13, 2020 3:02 PM
Reply to  Harvey

A society would have to make babies soiling their diapers a capital offense to be more evil than the US empire.

Gary Weglarz
Gary Weglarz
Jun 13, 2020 4:54 PM
Reply to  Harvey

(“The USA is an empire that wants to reverse 500 years of popular emancipation and progress”) – I must say as a rather serious student of colonial history over many decades now – I did both a double take – and then a triple take reading that line Harvey.
 
You won’t find a more clear critic of our illegal immoral and endless U.S. violence and mayhem and empire building in the world than yours truly. However, for you to simply whitewash 500+ years of Europe and her colonies – (the U.S. being the currently most powerful such former colony) – totally pillaging, enslaving and genociding the entire freaking planet is so completely preposterous that it does – in the name of intellectual honesty – require a little reality-check.
 
If I might recommend one worthwhile source that might expand your understanding of the past 500 years of colonialism and current neocolonialism, you might try reading the book: (“Late Victorian Holocausts: El Niño Famines and the Making of the Third World,” by Mike Davis). 
Of course there are plenty of other excellent sources readily available one could use to educate oneself regarding the last 500+ years of literally endless Western criminality and mayhem, Mr. Davis’ book is simply what I’m reading at the moment and it does document a relatively little known aspect of said colonial mayhem. It documents the needless starvation of tens of millions of people of color around the globe while under direct colonial rule in the name of – “protecting free markets & free trade.” Sound familiar?  
Then by all means do get back to us on your (“500 years of popular emancipation and progress”) comment.

Harvey
Harvey
Jun 14, 2020 1:23 AM
Reply to  Gary Weglarz

The problem is that people like you are totally ignoring the crimes against humanity the US is committing daily on an industrial scale. From Iran, Iraq, Syria, Libya, the whole of south America, even the murders in Europe to the 50 years destruction of the Cuban economy, as well as their crimes against their own population. There are just too many to list, the murder, the torture, the extortion, the destruction of freedom as well as the economic rape.
 
Start reading about their crimes todays,then get back to me.

Gary Weglarz
Gary Weglarz
Jun 14, 2020 2:37 AM
Reply to  Harvey

Dear Harvey, you ignored my critique of your dangerously ignorant comment claiming – “500 years of popular emancipation and progress” and instead accused me of something of which you are – by virtue of not knowing me personally – completely ignorant. Very interesting response to say the least.
 
Having not only spent many decades educating myself through reading the endless volumes of information available shedding light on American brutality, mayhem and war crimes – from our founding to the present – I’ve also manage four tours as a human rights observer and activist into three of our counter-insurgency war zones. You know, the actual places where the torture, death squads, terror and murder we in the U.S. pay for and train Latin American militaries to carry out actually take place.
 
I traveled to Nicaragua during the Contra war, El Salvador during our dirty war there and twice to Colombia where our murderous mayhem continues quite actively to this day. Though in your defensiveness and ignorance you accuse me of -(“ignoring the crimes against humanity the US is committing daily.”) – apparently simply because I dared to correct your fatuous comments blithely whitewashing 500+ years of Western barbarity and genocide that continues to this very day.
 
So please spare me your self-righteous nonsense about (“people like you (me),”) and perhaps instead, as I suggested earlier, try to educate yourself about more than what has simply taken place in your lifetime Harvey. Just a thought. I’ll stand by that book recommendation I made earlier.
 

tonyopmoc
tonyopmoc
Jun 12, 2020 7:38 PM

I have read a lot about Olof Palme in the past. So far as I remember he was Assassinated by evil people – probably British or American – MI6? CIA? but I can’t remember all the details, but he was probably a nice bloke or they wouldn’t have killed him. I doubt the Swedish did it. They are not like that. A bit of operation Gladio was it? It seems its back on. Who’s next?

My cousin has lived in Sweden almost all his life. I have met his Mum Aunty Sheila many times. I have never met him, but I have heard him on LBC on my way to work. I would love to visit him in Sweden.

My wife and I have loved Live music all our life, and we are not allowed to see it this, year…yet…

This is a link that works to Download, Donnington from Live 2019. Be careful googling it, cos earlier this morning my wife ended up on a spam site, that got her email address, and then it was asking for her credit card details, insisting there would be no charge…She asked me about it. Never give your credit card details to anyone, unless you are paying someone to buy something. Thank God, she didn’t.

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Tony

Dr NG Maroudas
Dr NG Maroudas
Jun 13, 2020 12:24 PM
Reply to  tonyopmoc

@Tony Opmoc: “I doubt the Swedish did it. They are not like that”.
 
Julian Assange might disagree: Carl Bildt, a PM who succeded Palme then cooked up the Case for the Persecution against Assange, is definitely “like that”. Many Iraqi, Libyan and Syrian victims attest to Sweden’s complicity in mass murder under such nauseatingly hypocritical pretexts such as “Liberal Interventions” and “Right to Protect”. Sweden is part of a potentially nuclear Scandiwegia playing anti-Russian NW-passage-suprematist power games in the Baltic.
 
“From fire, pestilence and Norsemen may the good Lord protect us” — prayer by British in the dark ages and Middle Easterners in the 21st century.

Philpot
Philpot
Jun 13, 2020 4:32 PM
Reply to  Dr NG Maroudas

You’re spot on. Has tonyopmoc not seen Game of Thrones?!

John A
John A
Jun 14, 2020 11:59 AM
Reply to  Dr NG Maroudas

Carl Bildt is high up in the Atlantic Council and proven to have been a CIA informant.

gordon
gordon
Jun 12, 2020 6:35 PM

ashkanazi good
goy nazi bad
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DID MOSSAD ASSASSINATE ANNA LINDH?
 
Sweden’s popular foreign minister Anna Lindh is the third high-ranking Swedish political opponent of Zionism to have been murdered since 1948, which raises the question: Was Lindh assassinated because of her outspoken opposition to Israel’s occupation of Palestine? 
 
 
http://www.hugequestions.com/Eric/TFC/by_Bollyn_Lindh-murder.htm
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The late Swedish Social Democrat Prime Minister Olof Palme – murdered in 1986 – was a pioneer of anti-Israel incitement. He accused Israel of Nazi practices
 
 
http://www.israelnationalnews.com/Articles/Article.aspx/16413

John A
John A
Jun 14, 2020 8:29 AM
Reply to  gordon

The guy who murdered Anna Lindh sounds exactly like Sirhan Sirhan who ‘assassinated’ Robert Kennedy. He was mind controlled and has no recollection of the murder or why he did it.

snuffleupagus
snuffleupagus
Jun 12, 2020 5:41 PM

of related interest:
 
Ron Unz — Mossad Assassinations

Waldorf
Waldorf
Jun 12, 2020 5:21 PM

Interesting that few take the Semdin Sakik “confession” seriously. He had been a PKK leader but defected to the Kurdish Democratic Party in 1998 before being captured by Turkish forces and has been in jail ever since. The suspicion that he talks or writes in response to Turkish state dictation is strong.

pasha
pasha
Jun 12, 2020 5:10 PM

I confess I’m baffled. The point of this article was–what exactly?

Geoffrey Skoll
Geoffrey Skoll
Jun 12, 2020 7:02 PM
Reply to  pasha

The point is to help explain why Sweden, once a beacon, has in the last 3 or 4 decades veered into a not very interesting acolyte of the global system of capital. Palme promised a third force, in some ways akin to Tito. That is why he had to go. And the failure of Sweden’s investigators is at least suspicious. Consider the far more recent case of Julia Assange.

Wobblyjack
Wobblyjack
Jun 12, 2020 8:09 PM
Reply to  Geoffrey Skoll

I had the good fortune to attend aninternational peace conference held at Sochi before the walls came tumbling down. I was befriended by members of the Swedish delegation. They believed, very firmly, that pro nuclear interests, both commercial and political, were involved. Their arguments were backed by some very solid info. Bearing in mind that this belief was quite widely held before the growth of conspiracy theorists. A couple disagreed and felt that the finger pointed towards a BOSS and Mossad operation. Mmm…

Geoffrey Skoll
Geoffrey Skoll
Jun 12, 2020 8:12 PM
Reply to  Wobblyjack

Wobbly also.

Martin Usher
Martin Usher
Jun 12, 2020 9:14 PM
Reply to  Wobblyjack

Same difference, surely? One of the more depressing things about the current state of the world is just how much productive effort and capital is tied up maintaining the status quo. Anything that threatens it becomes top of the hit list with even nominally warring groups uniting to deal with the threat.
 
We all know prominent people who speak truth to power. We also know that so long as they can be dismissed as a bit eccentric, “his heart might be in the right place but….” sorts then they’re largely tolerated. Should there be even the slightest danger that they may come to power then they’re dumped on from all sides — unelectable is the typical charge but there’s a fair bit of smearing going on as well (UK readers know all about this — the propaganda barrage doesn’t need to be particularly subtle so long as it gets the job done). If all else fails then its time to drag out the unfortuante accident or the lone gunman. The web of intrigue is so dense that you don’t need to do anything as obvious as an open conspiracy, you just plant the seeds, nurture their growth and wait for Nature takes its course.
 
Obviously if something goes seriously wrong and a nation state starts to go off the rails and refuses to play by the rules then its time for war. It could be a low key police action or other agent of regime change, it could be a full on Cold War or it could even turn hot. The important thing is to make sure that whatever else happens the ‘regime’ — target governments are always tagged with this codeword — never has the breathing room to be successful. Economic warfare and capital strikes are quite effective, developing and financing dissident groups is another, generating internal strife by encouraging disaffection amongs ethnic minorities (real or invented) is yet another. Should, against all odds, the regime succeed despite this ….. well, we’re waiting to see what happens.

Waldorf
Waldorf
Jun 13, 2020 5:30 AM
Reply to  Martin Usher

I suspect that is the case with the Labour Party in Britain, among other examples. As far as the state is concerned, it has to be led by someone reliable who will keep things as they are and favour the interests of imperialism and finance capital. Corbyn did not fit the bill so as Labour leader he never had even five minutes of peace and was under constant attack. Starmer does fit the bill. He will do as he is told.

Waldorf
Waldorf
Jun 13, 2020 5:38 AM
Reply to  Waldorf

To add to the foregoing thoughts, Corbyn would probably have had a Palme or Lindh-type demise if by a miracle he had made it to Prime Minister.

Mike Ellwood
Mike Ellwood
Jun 13, 2020 3:23 PM
Reply to  Waldorf

Chris Mullin wrote a book about it…over 35 years before it never happened. 😉

gordon
gordon
Jun 12, 2020 10:42 PM
Reply to  Geoffrey Skoll

We MUST Transform Europe Barbara Lerner Spectre 
 
 

Geoffrey Skoll
Geoffrey Skoll
Jun 12, 2020 11:44 PM
Reply to  gordon

How did the discussion about Sweden’s right wing (maybe even fascist?) shift get turned into a discussion about Zionism? One of Sweden’s problems is the anti-human shift toward monoculturalism and monoracism. Sweden has plenty of other problems too.

Richard Son
Richard Son
Jun 13, 2020 9:23 AM
Reply to  Geoffrey Skoll

Apparently Sweden did a fair bit of their own ethnic cleansing and removal of undesirables during WW2.

Harvey
Harvey
Jun 12, 2020 8:51 PM
Reply to  pasha

Your education.

Jen
Jen
Jun 12, 2020 9:31 PM
Reply to  pasha

The point of the article is that the Swedish authorities are uninterested in investigating the death of a Prime Minister – supposedly the most powerful and most important person in Sweden – who actually took very seriously for himself the moral role of being a social crusader and seeker of social justice that Sweden always claims to have.

The reality, as the link to the Elisabeth Asbrink article demonstrates, is that Sweden has a iong (still ongoing) obsession and love affair with conformism and social repression, evidenced in having had the world’s longest eugenics policy targeting tens of thousands of people, most of them young women, for “mental disabilities”, resulting in their sterilisation from the 1930s to 1975. Most of these victims were reported to authorities by their families, neighbours and in some cases by pastors in their local church parishes.

Behind the Social Justice Warrior mask is a nation that has been a de facto police state for at least 100 years.

Geoffrey Skoll
Geoffrey Skoll
Jun 12, 2020 11:46 PM
Reply to  Jen

As an outsider, I can ony go by Sweden’s international image in the 1950s and 60s. Was it really always thus? I am genuinely interested, not just making a rhetorical point.

Jen
Jen
Jun 13, 2020 6:43 AM
Reply to  Geoffrey Skoll

If you do a search on Google or most other search engines, you will find quite a few articles on Sweden’s eugenics program that targeted young people as “mentally defective” or whatever the description was at the time (1930s to 1975) if they showed signs of being rebellious or non-conformist. Many people really did end up being sterilised as a result of being snitched on and reported to authorities. In the same period there was industrial unrest and in one incident (Adalen shooting incident in Angermanland, near Norrbotten in 1931), military troops actually fired on civilians.

Geoffrey Skoll
Geoffrey Skoll
Jun 13, 2020 2:49 PM
Reply to  Jen

Thanks for the information.

Jen
Jen
Jun 13, 2020 6:50 AM
Reply to  Geoffrey Skoll

Yep, just done a quick check on Google and figures given for the numbers of people sterilised under Sweden’s eugenics program range from 21,000 (minimum who were forcibly sterilised) to 60,000, depending on the information source. Most victims were women.

Mike Ellwood
Mike Ellwood
Jun 13, 2020 3:31 PM
Reply to  Geoffrey Skoll

It’s interesting that several fiction writers, in slightly different ways, used their (on the surface, crime fiction) to make a critique of Sweden’s apparently ideal/idealistic Social Democracy. Namely: Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö (“Martin Beck”); Henning Mankel (“Wallander”); Stieg Larsson (” Lisbeth Salander”). All, to a varying extent, somewhat left-wing.

Elrin
Elrin
Jun 12, 2020 10:52 PM
Reply to  pasha

I read one paragraph and your comment which is probably enough then.

acar burak
acar burak
Jun 12, 2020 4:16 PM

An article about Palme, which does not even mention US & co. [It does mention the US – Admin] manages to say nothing? Maybe not so surprising though, when you consider it’s in a New Right site (Off-G) essentially promoting the truth-hiding conspiracy theorists.
 

tony_opmoc
tony_opmoc
Jun 12, 2020 5:01 PM
Reply to  acar burak

acar,

If Off-G is right wing, then I am on the extreme freedom left of political theory, and should recognise you on the extreme authoritarian right, cos such things are global and circular, but I can’t see you yet.

Can you please complete this test quickly and honestly.

https://www.politicalcompass.org/test

Thanks,

Tony

tony_opmoc
tony_opmoc
Jun 12, 2020 6:08 PM
Reply to  tony_opmoc

Me – Green – about the same level a Ghandi, but more to the Left
Economic Left/Right: -7.5 Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -5.64 
Try it is just a bit of fun
 
Tony
 

acar burak
acar burak
Jun 12, 2020 6:10 PM
Reply to  tony_opmoc

Tony,
 
You know that these tests are very foolish, right? Well then, here’s mine:
https://www.politicalcompass.org/yourpoliticalcompass?ec=-7.13&soc=-7.44
 
Economic Left/Right: -7.13Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -7.44

tony_opmoc
tony_opmoc
Jun 12, 2020 6:28 PM
Reply to  acar burak

acar, haha very close to me.
 
and the edit function works.sorry for spelling your name wrong.

acar burak
acar burak
Jun 12, 2020 6:56 PM
Reply to  tony_opmoc

No problem.
 
To do something you need to organize and as soon as you start to organize you (and your “comrades”) start to corrupt as well and then revolution devours its children. And all this presuming you’ve overcome the world against you.
 
I’m closer to anarchism yet I don’t have the required benign view of humanity. Besides, anarchism can be a fine cover for cowardice or apathy.
 
Long story short, I’m against oppression, dishonesty etc. and on the side of conscience, all this hopelessly, cowardly in my closet. I would prefer to be a hopeless hero rather than a hopeless coward.

Gezzah Potts
Gezzah Potts
Jun 13, 2020 12:37 AM
Reply to  tony_opmoc

Interesting test Tony. Answered every question, and it turns out I’m in the Libertarian Left corner of the box at the end of it. Hope your weekend goes well.

Frank Lodge
Frank Lodge
Jun 12, 2020 5:04 PM
Reply to  acar burak

It mentions the CIA.
It’s in the business of setting out the facts of the case, which it does.
Damned if I’ve ever seen any indication of “New-Right” leanings in any of the numerous OffG articles I’ve read.
Which “truth-hiding conspiracy theorists” did you have in mind?
(I mean, obviously all conspiracy theorists are truth-hiding, as it’s well known to all the pure in thought that no association of two or more people has ever colluded with a less than honest purpose in the whole history of the human race. Maybe you need to be more specific?)

acar burak
acar burak
Jun 12, 2020 6:20 PM
Reply to  Frank Lodge

Haven’t read all of the Off-G, felt no stomach for it, but, for instance: The ridiculous and dishonest James Corbet (an Assange accuser). Look at the angle Off-G has chosen regarding the US protests. Hopkins’ latest, shamelessly dishonest propaganda white washing Trump as an anti-establishment hero and the liberator of Middle East!!!!!

Paul too
Paul too
Jun 12, 2020 8:31 PM
Reply to  acar burak

Guilt by association is a little unfair in an open and attempting to be honest discussion.
 
OffG have only posted Corbett’s covid related material as part of the ongoing covid discussion and whilst I hope he’s not right a lot of what he’s been warning has been unfolding right under our eyes very clearly for the past few months, it’s hard to deny when compared to the official narrative of it being pretty much nothing to worry about (latest NHS England statistics showing 95% of those who died had an average of nearly 2 co-mobility diseases, Chris Whitty’s speech a few weeks ago) interspersed with the world is fucking ending (globocap’s message since day one) and we’d better be happy to be messed around in whatever way some powerful psychos find particularly amusing at the time (introducing compulsory wearing of masks only when ‘threat’ is on the way out) has me a lot more open to trying to gain insight into what is going on, and I’d bet that’s why OffG decided to post his work and why others are interested in what he has to say on this subject.
 
I don’t recall any Assange accusing articles ever being posted here, and the comments I remember suggesting he may be controlled opposition were mostly grouping him in with Icke and Corbett.
 
All I can say on Hopkins’ articles is I seriously think you’re missing the point and his sarcasm as that’s now how they come across to me at all!!!

acar burak
acar burak
Jun 12, 2020 9:25 PM
Reply to  Paul too

Hopkins:
 
 

Trump is just a symbol, after all. It’s the dissatisfaction with global capitalism (and its smiley, happy, valueless values, and its post-ideological ideology) that GloboCap is determined to crush, so they can get back to the unfinished business of restructuring the entire Middle East, and anywhere else that’s not playing ball, and dissolving what is left of national sovereignty, and transforming the world into one big marketplace

 
I don’t have much issue with Off-G’s Covid-19 stance, though that Chris Whitty quote was not a very smart move by Off-G as he was not really arguing against the mainstream narrative [yes that was the whole point! – ed]; the %1 IFR is more or less what Ferguson too had said I guess.
 
I’ve watched half of one of Corbett videos linked by Off-G and seen not real substance just like some of his other videos I’ve come across previously. But anyway this is who James Corbett really is (16:09):
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Zd3j5lZTMg&feature=emb_logo
 
Is this lower than, say, Pompeo? Or just about the same? Or maybe just above him…
 

John Pretty
John Pretty
Jun 12, 2020 10:34 PM
Reply to  acar burak

Well, I don’t know if I agree with James, but I’m not sure why you want to associate him with Pompeo?
 
I take it you don’t share James’ opinion either?
 
You know, with all that’s happening in the world at the moment, I am really getting mightily pissed off with people tarring others simply because they dare to have a different opinion.
 
What makes your opinion so mighty? What makes you right and James wrong?

acar burak
acar burak
Jun 12, 2020 10:54 PM
Reply to  John Pretty

Well, you’d better start speaking after you learn to exercise a little bit of logic so that you don’t put yourself in a self-defeating, ridiculous situation. But if your only wish is to fart away, go on to be mightily pissed off in this comment section, while you fight for the big issues of the world.

Даниела Тошева
Даниела Тошева
Jun 14, 2020 9:55 AM
Reply to  acar burak

It appears to me that you insist on playing the man, not the ball.

Define Big Issues in your eyes &

Your reasoning, for your presence.

acar burak
acar burak
Jun 14, 2020 4:00 PM

You’re wrong, I just do it when the man (John Pretty) tries to play me –in a very idiotic way.
 
Pompeo’s comment about Wikileaks/Assange is (in)famous. Even if he didn’t know he would search “Pompeo Assange”.
 
But the real funny part is his self-defeating 3rd paragraph. “With all that’s happening in the world at the moment” (hence my “big issues” reference) he manages to be “mightily pissed off” with a guy in the obscure corner of that world just because he “dares to have a different opinion”. And that disgusting monologue of J. Corbett about Assange, at best stemming from a very vicious Salieri complex, that dishonest attacking a conscientious and honorable man being tormented for years is not tarring but my pointing out that is tarring. In short a man with a following (Corbett) is free to hit anyone one without impunity, but an obscure guy can’t be allowed to question it. Do I need to continue?
 
Your last line (“Your reasoning, for your presence”) is either too cryptic to understand or too corrupt to answer. Are you accusing me to be a Russian bot (in the case a Turkish one)?

Dungroanin
Dungroanin
Jun 13, 2020 9:06 AM
Reply to  Frank Lodge

Hard BrexShit peddling is ‘new (alt) right’.

Left – right , are the creation of the Above upon these Below to keep them from punching up and demanding freedom from their ancient slavery , by getting them fighting amongs themselves – like 3 Stooges!

el Gallinazo
el Gallinazo
Jun 12, 2020 5:08 PM
Reply to  acar burak

Left wing – right wing, it’s the same ugly bird, and these terms which may have had significance where they originated in the 18th century French parliament, are now simply used by our overlords to divide and conquer.

snuffleupagus
snuffleupagus
Jun 12, 2020 5:32 PM
Reply to  el Gallinazo

the original meaning of this terminology, was that the “left” was in favour of abolishing inequality of wealth and power, whereas the “right” was in favour of maintaining or increasing it.
 
in this sense, these ideas are just as relevant as they ever were, since current economic inequality far surpasses that of the eighteenth or nineteenth century; only that prevailing in the Roman Empire is comparable.
 
all the shouting about micro-aggressions, toxic masculinity, and transgender toilets is intended to obscure this fundamental social reality, and disrupt potential mass resistance to it. this is the entire purpose of the identity-politics fake “left”; it has been consciously manufactured for this specific purpose.

acar burak
acar burak
Jun 12, 2020 6:23 PM
Reply to  snuffleupagus

Very well explained, thank you.

Dors
Dors
Jun 12, 2020 9:57 PM
Reply to  snuffleupagus

Your outline of the left vs right division is fair.
 
It is good enough to make me want to add my own thoughts, and before them, add this quote.
 
In the French Revolution, “Of the 14,080 victims …, 6.5% belonged to the clergy, 8.25% to the nobility, 10.5% to the lower middle class, 14% to the upper middle class, 28% to the peasantry and 31.25% to the working class. Assuming that prosperous shopkeepers and petty civil servants formed the social frontier between the upper and lower classes, between “aristocrats” and “sans-cullottes,” the latter make up 70% of the total number of victims, the former less than 30%. … Thus, the lower classes supplied three victims to every one from the upper classes. Or if we wish to consider only the formal divisions of eighteenth century society, 84% of the victims belonged to the Third Estate.” (Greer, 1935/1966, p. 97).
 
* It is possible that the original left project was … a mask, used by a power elite against another power elite.
 
* The more we move toward absolute equality, the more the egalitarian aspiration becomes absurd: both more difficult and less meaningful. On the other hand,
 
* In circumstances of extreme inequalities like today, egalitarian approach toward them is just about the most important thing.
 
* The most important thing, ultimately, will turn out to have nothing to do with quantitative concerns, and everything to do with quality.
 
* My strong impression is that the left loses its future by renouncing its roots, more or less, in feelings of sacredness.
The left was originally a continuation of Christianity, an ingenious note struck in the ongoing music of history. But, by players with a bad state of mind, who made other choices that were very bad. Reading 18th C thinkers, including Maistre, has become unbearable to me : how could these “giants” have been so shallow?!
As a tree cannot grow upwards without firm roots, so a civilisation cannot grow without firm roots in the past and in the individual’s inner life.
 

Richard Son
Richard Son
Jun 13, 2020 9:38 AM
Reply to  Dors

If you think Christianity was some kind of positive force, you have some homework to do. But I suppose it is true in that both the left and Christianity were fake revolts and real social control schemes manipulated by entities who could barely register as human.

Richard Son
Richard Son
Jun 13, 2020 9:26 AM
Reply to  acar burak

Good luck with your pathetic propaganda. You wouldn’t know “right” if it kicked you in the nuts.

acar burak
acar burak
Jun 13, 2020 4:14 PM
Reply to  Richard Son

Pathetic propaganda for what? For something, or other? I got it. Since you seem to be an authoritative source about me, let me correct you in a superficial area: I’ve been literally kicked by “right” numerous times and lived my whole life in the ocean of “right”.

Jim McDonagh
Jim McDonagh
Jun 12, 2020 2:26 PM

Business as usual in the political assassination game . The deep states in all countries find that conspiracy theories that can be spun up when the actual killers are shielded is a gift that keeps on giving . JFK, MLK, and RFK and the hundreds if not thousands who met the same fate globally in the 20th century alone come to mind. Sweden became a full on Fascist satrapy of the American Alliance from that point on.

snuffleupagus
snuffleupagus
Jun 12, 2020 5:37 PM
Reply to  Jim McDonagh

the actual killers are not conspirators? everything happens by convenient coincidence?

Gary Weglarz
Gary Weglarz
Jun 12, 2020 2:12 PM

Many threads touched on here and many more are not. The conduct of the police investigation mirrored that of other assassinations in the West in which the State acted effectively to conceal evidence rather than apprehend the assassin. The CIA/NATO Operation Gladio network was in place and could be activated to carry out such a cleansing of those in the European political class who strayed too far afield from their class interests. But my favorite “theory” (with some modification) is that proposed by author Stieg Larsson (see quote toward the end of post).
 
Several years ago when I was reading a good deal on Palme’s assassination I came across the work of one researcher (the name now lost to my memory) who contended that Palme was aware of the Iran/Contra drugs for guns network with global players and was prepared to make it public. He was assassinated in February 1986 and Iran/Contra was exposed in November of that year.
 
Who knows? For my money (history being what it is) I’ll always place my bet on the CIA as the prime culprit pulling strings (though of course always maintaining “plausible deniability”). Our American dirty wars in Nicaragua, Guatemala and El Salvador were all going full bore, with torture, disappearance and assassinations the order of the day. On the domestic front massive amounts of cocaine were being smuggled into the country by the CIA as part of Iran/Contra, devastating America’s poor urban ghettos. It was a “perfect circle” Ollie North and company had devised. The poor and disenfranchised in America through buying drugs to narcotize their own pain and despair were simultaneously paying for the Contra’s weapons then used to slaughter the “poor” in Nicaragua. So obviously given such an operation any hints of the possible exposure of Iran/Contra would have made everyone in Washington homicidally nervous.
 
(“Stieg Larsson thought that it was South Africa that instigated the murder, and for reasons connected to the weapons trade all over the world that was going on at the time, connected to the Iran-Contra affair. That was the motive behind it,” Stocklassa said. “there was a war going on, the end of the Cold War, and one of the places where they were carrying out the war was South Africa.”)
 
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/stieg-larssons-investigation-of-swedish-prime-minister-olof-palme-unsolved-murder-revealed-new-book-2019-09-28/
 
Occam’s Razor suggests that if it was South Africa that in fact “instigated the murder” on the ground – it was the very likely the CIA that first and foremost instructed South Africa regarding what needed to be done in order to protect Iran/Contra. There is no way South Africa undertakes this assassination without CIA approval. And there is no way such an effective coverup is conducted without the cooperation of the Western intelligence services.
 

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Jun 12, 2020 2:01 PM

Well, of course we get nowhere if we look at one murder in isolation. If, for example, we suspect Palme was killed by another country or corporate interests, that would make more sense if those interests took a similar attitude to other persons. Or if such interests felt empowered to silence international figures, even prominent persons.
 
On the corollary, if people in similar positions to Palme were able to express similar views freely, without interruption by a bullet, we might look to a personal motive or vendetta.
 
I just throw that out there and, with no special knowledge, the name of another Swede Dag Hammarskjöld.
 
From intelligence-controlled Wikipedia: “In 1998, documents surfaced suggesting CIA, MI6, and/or Belgian mining interest involvement via a South African paramilitary organization. The information was contained in a file from the South African National Intelligence Agency turned over to the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission in relation to the 1993 assassination of Chris Hani, leader of the South African Communist Party. These documents included an alleged plot to “remove” Hammarskjöld and contained a supposed statement from CIA director Allen Dulles that “Dag is becoming troublesome … and should be removed.” Hammarskjöld’s mission to end the war over the mineral-rich Katangese secession from the newly formed Republic of the Congo was contrary to the interests of those organizations. However these documents were copies rather than originals, precluding substantiation of authenticity through ink and paper testing.[32]”
 

Jim McDonagh
Jim McDonagh
Jun 12, 2020 2:31 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

Hammarskjold was being outed as the a Nazi war criminal which he was . His death allowed him to be rewritten as a Mandela. His earlier life , an embarrassment or worse to the fledgling UN , tossed down the memory hole.

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Jun 12, 2020 2:35 PM
Reply to  Jim McDonagh

That, too. There is a fine list of postwar institutions which all seemed to be headed by Nazis which is remarkable since they ‘lost the war’ ) But I’m sure they had their differences.

Wobblyjack
Wobblyjack
Jun 12, 2020 8:27 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

[email protected] post. Didn’t they do well?

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jun 12, 2020 3:53 PM
Reply to  Jim McDonagh

They didn’t seem all that embarrassed by Kurt Waldheim’s Nazi past, nor was Pope John Paul 2, who hosted him at Castel Gandolfo.

So what was different, 25 years later? Too venerable to be bothered?

Jim McDonagh
Jim McDonagh
Jun 12, 2020 11:09 PM
Reply to  John Ervin

After 25 years many of those that did care are dead or out of the game. Werner Von Braun was was also exempted from his NAZI past, and he actually executed Jewish slave laborers he deemed saboteurs at Dora the V-1 V-2 Production facility.

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jun 13, 2020 5:18 AM
Reply to  Jim McDonagh

Well, I don’t trust all the story on Wernher. Given the U.S. slant, it wouldn’t really surprise me if you were right, but I’ve read a lot about him and his stint at Peenemunde and how others had said that if he had not complied with the program on prisoners, he would have been shot dead on the spot.

Which the Nazis had a habit of doing, the silly terrorists. I knew well several people in my early days who told me they saw just that happen.

Von Braun also wrote about Hitler as “a pompous fool”. Hardly the words of a true team player. Do you have a source for the Dora executions?

~~~~~~~

“Von Braun was only aiming for the moon, but he kept hitting London.”

~~Mort Sahl

Jim McDonagh
Jim McDonagh
Jun 13, 2020 2:10 PM
Reply to  John Ervin

Von Braun was one of Alan Dulles’ great successes , Von Braun was a prime mover in the US militarized rocket program and was rewritten by US propagandists accordingly . Mort Sahl was being sarcastic . There was an excellent documentary on Dora some years back and Mr Von Braun’s role in that slave camps operation . Survivors of the camp testified to his hands on touch in killing those who displeased him. I would guess its been scrubbed from You Tube and PBS since . Kissinger and Von Braun were in fact the role models for Dr Strangelove.

Jim McDonagh
Jim McDonagh
Jun 12, 2020 2:42 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

The UN was/is always a tool of American foreign policy from the beginning , Alan Dulles found it useful.

Даниела Тошева
Даниела Тошева
Jun 14, 2020 6:44 PM
Reply to  Jim McDonagh

In the extreme, for listening purposes 😉

Mike Ellwood
Mike Ellwood
Jun 13, 2020 4:12 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus
Alan Tonkin
Alan Tonkin
Jun 12, 2020 1:35 PM

If anyone is interested, there is a very comprehensive investigation in book form by Ole Dammegard. https://lightonconspiracies.com/

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jun 13, 2020 5:06 AM
Reply to  Alan Tonkin

Thanks. I intend to. A roommate of mine about 50 years ago, a Marshall Scholar from Omaha, to Oxford, was a big fan of Olaf Palme and was often talking to us about him. I was rather young, late teens, and our friend was my Olaf Palme source in California, as I really didn’t hear about him much elsewhere, in our nationally self-isolating culture and chronic insular news lockdown.

But all of what I heard was of noble note and he came across as a brave peace warrior, and came to be an iconic name, so that his murder really stands out in contrast among memories of that dreary Reagan era. I remembered, with so much bad news in our country then, his death was almost like the last straw, cold and heartbreaking. I didn’t know enough about him then, but his name always was a symbol of good and the right direction nonetheless.