91

Capitalism and the Throttling of Democracy in India

Colin Todhunter

The deregulation of international capital flows (financial liberalisation) has effectively turned the planet into a free-for-all bonanza for the world’s richest capitalists. Under the post-World-War Two Bretton Woods monetary regime, nations put restrictions on the flow of capital.

Domestic firms and banks could not freely borrow from banks elsewhere or from international capital markets, without seeking permission, and they could not simply take their money in and out of other countries.

Domestic financial markets were segmented from international ones elsewhere. Governments could to a large extent run their own macroeconomic policy without being restrained by monetary or fiscal policies devised by others. They could also have their own tax and industrial policies without having to seek market confidence or worry about capital flight.

However, the dismantling of Bretton Woods and the deregulation of global capital movement has led to the greater incidence of financial crises (including sovereign debt) and has deepened the level of dependency of nation states on capital markets.

If we turn to India, we can see the implications very clearly. The increasing deregulation of financial capital flows means that global finance is in a position to dictate domestic policy.

Successive administrations have made the country dependent on volatile flows of foreign capital and India’s foreign exchange reserves have been built up by borrowing and foreign investments. For policy makers, the fear of capital flight is ever-present. Policies are often governed by the drive to attract and retain foreign capital inflows.

The author(s) of a recent article by the Research Unit for Political Economy (RUPE) notes that instead of imposing controls on flows of foreign capital and pursuing a path of democratic development, the Indian government has chosen to submit to the regime of foreign finance, awaiting signals on how much it can spend, giving up any pretence of economic sovereignty.

Anxious to shore up foreign exchange holdings, the Modi-led government is trying to attract even more risky foreign investments. Moreover, in a time of economic and social crisis, resulting from the draconian coronavirus-related lockdown, public spending to ameliorate the desperate situations of those affected has been abysmally low. This falls into line with the imperatives of global capital, which requires nation states to curb spending so that private investors can occupy the arena left open.

RUPE notes that the Indian government is also appealing to the US for help in addressing India’s foreign exchange conundrum (its foreign exchange reserves are largely based on borrowing which could exit). This will require some kind of ‘payback’.

Such payback could come in the form of a future trade deal. India is currently involved in ongoing trade talks with the US. If this deal goes through and India capitulates to US demands, it could devastate the dairy, poultry, soybean, maize and other sectors and severely deepen the crisis in the countryside.

Ranil Salgado, mission chief for India at the IMF, says that when the economic shock (resulting from the coronavirus lockdown) passes, it’s important that India returns to its path of undertaking long-term reforms. This would mean global conglomerates being able to further hollow out the remnants of nation state sovereignty.

Foreign capital is in the process of displacing the prevailing agrifood model before bringing India’s food and agriculture sector under its control. Millions of small-scale and marginal farmers are already suffering economic distress and leaving farming as the sector is deliberately made financially non-viable for them. The Modi administration is fully on board with the World Bank’s pro-corporate ‘enabling the business of agriculture’ and other such policies aimed at further incorporating nation states into the neoliberal fold and which equate neoliberal fundamentalism with ‘development’.

Recent developments will merely serve to accelerate this process as we see with regard to the Karnataka Land Reform Act, which will make it easier for business to purchase agricultural land (resulting in increased landlessness and urban migration) and the undermining of the Agricultural Produce Market Committees (mandis), part of an ongoing process to dismantle India’s public distribution system and price support mechanisms for farmers. These ‘reforms’ are ultimately about ‘liberalising’ agriculture to further ease the entrance of foreign agribusiness interests like Cargill – even as ordinary Indians suffer.

And have no doubt, they are suffering. A recent news analysis report claims India let 65 million tonnes of grain go to waste in four months, even as the poor went hungry as a result of the coronavirus lockdown.

The authors claim that this resulted from the government being wedded to neoliberal ideology and the dogma of ‘fiscal prudence’. They also ask why the Food Corporation of India has been holding such a large surplus of grain and conclude that it is because the government has been unwilling to expand the public distribution scheme.

In effect, US agribusiness wants India to tighten ‘fiscal prudence’, reduce subsidies and public sector spending on agriculture. The aim is to further displace peasant farmers thereby driving even more people to cities and ensure corporate consolidation and commercialisation of the sector based on industrial-scale monocrop farms incorporated into global supply chains dominated by transnational agribusiness and retail giants.

This runs counter to what is actually required. The various lockdowns around the globe have already exposed the fragility of the global food system, dominated by long-line supply chains and global conglomerates – which effectively suck food and wealth from the Global South to the richer nations.

What we have seen underscores the need for a radical transformation of the prevailing globalised food regime founded on one which reduces dependency on global conglomerates, external proprietary inputs, distant volatile commodity markets and patented technologies.

Practical solutions to the (global) agrarian crisis must be based on sustainable agriculture which places the small farmer at the centre of policies: far-sighted and sustained policy initiatives centred on self-sufficiency, localisation, food sovereignty, regenerative agriculture and agroecology.

On a macro level, economist Prabhat Patnaik argues that India must delink from neoliberal globalisation via capital controls; manage foreign trade and expand the domestic market through the protection and encouragement of petty production, including peasant agriculture; increase welfare expenditure by the state; and commit to a more egalitarian distribution of wealth and income.

Rather than have transnational agribusiness corporations determining global and regional policies and private capital throttling democracy, we require a system of healthy food and sustainable agriculture that is run for human need.

In fact, what may actually be required is an alternative to ‘development’ because, as post-development theorist Arturo Escobar explains, global inequality remains severe, both between and within nations, and environmental devastation and human dislocation, driven by political as well as ecological factors, continue to worsen.

These are the symptoms of the failure of ‘development’, a concept based on capitalism’s overproduction-overconsumption ‘growth’ logic with all that follows in terms of environmental degradation and the economic plunder of nations and peoples.

Looking at the situation in Latin America, Escobar says development strategies have centred on large-scale interventions, such as the expansion of oil palm plantations, mining and large port development. And it is similar in India: commodity monocropping; immiseration in the countryside; the appropriation of biodiversity (the means of subsistence for millions of rural dwellers); unnecessary and inappropriate environment-destroying, people-displacing infrastructure projects; and state-backed violence against the poorest and most marginalised sections of society.

Perhaps we should be taking our cue from the world’s indigenous peoples whose societies display a deep connection with and respect for nature. Their economics and cultures often represent the antithesis of capitalism and industrialisation: the promotion of long-term sustainability through restraint in what is taken from nature, rather than hierarchy and competition.

This was echoed by Noam Chomsky during a 2014 interview:

There are sectors of the global population trying to impede the global catastrophe. There are other sectors trying to accelerate it. Take a look at whom they are. Those who are trying to impede it are the ones we call backward, indigenous populations – the First Nations in Canada, the aboriginals in Australia, the tribal people in India. Who is accelerating it? The most privileged, so-called advanced, educated populations of the world.”

With this in mind, soil, water, seeds, land, forests and other natural resources must be democratically controlled and recognised as common wealth and the scaling up of agroecological approaches should be a lynchpin of genuine rural development, which in turn must be modelled on the notion of food sovereignty.

Renowned agronomist MS Swaminathan says:

Independent foreign policy is only possible with food security. Therefore, food has more than just eating implications. It protects national sovereignty, national rights and national prestige.”

Genuine food security in principle derives from food sovereignty, which, in a very broad sense, is based on the right of peoples and sovereign states to democratically determine their own agricultural and food policies.

The struggle to assert genuine self-determination and democratic development in India involves challenging the dominance of private (international) capital. It also entails disputing the authority of a central state and its machinery that, at independence, was designed to consolidate power at the centre, quell dissent, divide the masses and, with the undemocratic and unaccountable influence of foreign interests like the Ford Foundation and more recently the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, ultimately serve the interests of both old and new colonial masters.

can you spare $1.00 a month to support independent media

Unlike the Guardian we are NOT funded by Bill & Melinda Gates, or any other NGO or government. So a few coins in our jar to help us keep going are always appreciated.

Our Bitcoin JTR code is: 1JR1whUa3G24wXpDyqMKpieckMGGW2u2VX

5 6 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
91 Comments
newest
oldest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Wilmers31
Wilmers31
Jun 28, 2020 7:03 AM

India is crucial at this point. Should they abandon their neutrality and become part of the American ‘guided’ group, American ideology will demand obedience for a long time and what results will not look pretty. Baltimore and Minneapolis are NOT attractive. If India can be roped into the American obedience club it will take a while to shake off the shackles.
 
India may also find herself on the outside. It is not unthinkable that China will be subject to sanctions plus all countries who are part of Nordstream2.
 
This will create quite a club under sanctions which is larger than the countries not under sanctions. It makes a mockery of sanctions designed to force obedience.

tonyopmoc
tonyopmoc
Jun 27, 2020 1:13 AM

We love India, and were, actually there – maybe the fourth time, and they did have a one day food strike about 12-15 years ago, I guess. Still they were lovely to us – and we travelled..in Kerala by Tuk Tuk and we both felt completely loved and graced, when we were invited into their inner sanctum – 45 minutes away.
 
There were about 10,000 there. They spoke very little English and I think we were the only English people there..
 
The children were so beautifully dressed, and were just so lovely to us…
 
They put flower garlands around our necks.
 
I realised no photography was allowed in their inner sanctum, so I turned it off, and we took our sandals off.
 
We have never met such lovely people, anywhere in the World…
 
We want to go back.
 
How much is the Visa now?
 
Have they got live bands on again yet?
 
Tony

paul
paul
Jun 26, 2020 7:18 PM

Indians are nice people but most of them are very poor. The income per head is about $2,000. Most of the Indians I knew were earning about £70 a month. Some Indian women I knew were getting 50p a day for sweeping the street with brooms. That’s the reality of the world we live in.

Robbobbobin
Robbobbobin
Jun 26, 2020 6:37 PM

Colin Todhunter, one of the most persistently eniightened ATL commenters whose

Robbobbobin
Robbobbobin
Jun 26, 2020 6:45 PM
Reply to  Robbobbobin

Oops. My virtual keyboard seems to be on a roll, sabotaging my posts.

Sophie - Admin1
Admin
Sophie - Admin1
Jun 26, 2020 6:54 PM
Reply to  Robbobbobin

Were you not able to edit for the allotted 15 mins?

Robbobbobin
Robbobbobin
Jun 29, 2020 3:24 AM

“Oops. My virtual keyboard seems to be on a roll, sabotaging my posts.”

“Were you not able to edit for the allotted 15 mins?”

Yes I was, but I didn’t. I was stealing the time to write the post from something else that had a more imminent deadline, so I switched my immediate attention to that instead. At the moment a virtual keyboarded device keeps me better connected to the Internet than a real one but it is lumbered with capacitance effects that my klutziness has triggered to post incomplete comments; two particularly short ones in the last week.

When I had time to get back to the comments concerned I have realized that, yet again, they were contrary to prevailing ignorant mobthink* and, as such, in essence, were not worth retrying. So I didn’t. Only, the second (current) time I thought I should post a brief, short explanation/apology that you, naturally, picked up on as a reference to one of your daily professional concerns, which it wasn’t. So a second, personal apology for (the phrasing of?) that.

* For instance, I recently I posted an ironic reference to Peter Thiel as being one of the commons-predatory financiers beind an entity the ignorant mobthink has recently been stamping its foot about. Peter Thiel’s immensely lucrative involvement in the establishment of PayPal, a venture that was very carefully set up as a non-banking entity that is thus outside of the channels that independent nation states employ/ed to implement capital controls of the type Colin mentions, was partly based on a hunch about its popular appeal to those who seek, however blindly, to replace a universal plebiscite (progressive lefty communism) with a wallet-qualified vote (regressive righty fascism), but it was also a carefully considered ideological gambit to bypass and vitiate nation states’ very abilities to impose such capital controls by hopefully significantly increasing those states’ private external debt (vis-a-vis state external debt); an ideological gambit that he clearly articulated while he was still very much involved with PayPal’s day-to-day operations, well before his ascendancy to international fiscal sainthood. Mr Thiel is a very nasty commons-predatory thug and rapacious diner on Other People’s Babies.

Petra Liverani (regarding whom I have yet to finish a much delayed post to you), amongst others, constantly rabbits on about how the hidden hand continually chortles in our faces after promulgating any of its more decisive writs. She has it back to front, both semantically and syntactically. It doesn’t post-chortle, it pre-enunciates (see the neocon’s proposal for a New American Century or Tony Blair’s pitch for the UK’s Labour Party leadership for prime examples) then ruthlessly gets on with the job, no petty public post-chortling involved needed or even considered, just effectiveness-rating, commons-predatory accounting.

Despite its frequently self proclaimed prescience in the matter of dot connection the ignorant mobthink wouldn’t know a connect from a dot if one of each of those got alongside of it and simultaneously sunk their teeth into both sides of its self-indulgent, id-dominated, foot-stampingly lard-arsed butt.

Robbobbobin
Robbobbobin
Jun 29, 2020 3:27 AM
Reply to  Robbobbobin

But either I am forgetting my “/”s or this editor doesn’t like embedded blockquotes.

Robbobbobin
Robbobbobin
Jun 29, 2020 3:35 AM
Reply to  Robbobbobin

And its (embedded?) blockquotes don’t seem to like internal linefeeds (or translates them to “p”s that it then fails to render?).

Sophie - Admin1
Admin
Sophie - Admin1
Jun 29, 2020 10:13 AM
Reply to  Robbobbobin

The comment software uses Quill, which famously does not permit <p> tags inside blockquotes, as I think explained on the dedicated comment thread. I have taken it up with the developers and they have promised to address the issue

Robbobbobin
Robbobbobin
Jun 29, 2020 2:10 PM

Thanks. P.S. I’m now also having trouble with text embedded in anchor tags, e.g. (a “href=example.com”)embedded text(/a), where ( and ) are, of course, angle brackets. Strips entire link, leaves only embedded text.

Kitty
Kitty
Jun 26, 2020 11:33 AM

It didn’t take long for Starmer to show true colours. No surprise considering his leadership campaign was bankrolled to the tune of £50, 000 by the pro Israel lobbyists.This information was kept from the public until after the polls had closed. I can just see the uproar there would be if a politician was bankrolled by pro Russian lobbyists. How is it right that politicians are allowed to accept money from lobbyists representing the interests of a foreign government. No reports in the MSM about the Israeli diplomat who has filed a complaint agadinst the police after he was pulled to the ground in Jerusalem by four security guards, who knelt on his neck for five minutes as he cried out: “I can’t breathe
So it would seem that the ‘choke hold” is alive and well so sadly the media claiming Rebecca Long Bailey is spreading conspiracy stories is just more propaganda.

Arby
Arby
Jun 26, 2020 12:58 AM

“…the imperatives of global capital, which requires nation states to curb spending so that private investors can occupy the arena left open.”
 
Capitalists are causing more trouble than ever in their desperate bid to keep alive their capitalist (insane, unworkable) reality. I sent off a complaint to the Toronto Transit Commission today. Vaccine Choice Canada was a great help there, sending me some links, including one to info from our Ontario Human Rights Commission. In a list of answers to the question “Can an employer, service provider or landlord require me to wear a mask because of COVID-19?” we get: 
 

  • An inability to access or use a mask or other equipment, or to follow a health and safety procedure, must not lead to automatic negative consequences such as employee discipline or termination, complete denial of service or eviction from housing.
  • No one should experience harassment or other discriminatory treatment based on a Code ground because they are unable to wear a mask, or choose to wear, or not wear, a mask, or require someone else to wear a mask based on advice from public health officials.

 
I pointed that out to TTC, noting that unless Rob Ford has changed his mind about not mandating that we all wear masks everywhere, then this is abusive and even just the announcement that the TTC has made that come July 2 we must all wear masks on public transit discriminated against me. I also pointed out in my complaint that once I put that mask on, the discrimination will have escalated to assault.
 
To Colin’s point, above, I pointed out in my letter of complaint that the TTC is a ‘major’ client of a prp (public relations propaganda) organization, namely Omnicom, that is known for featuring “products that are a danger to humanity,” as Peter Phillips points out in his book titled “Giants.” Peter goes on to note that “PRP firms offer brand enhancement worldwide for numerous tobacco, alcohol, junk food (sugar, salty, and fatty “treats”), and pharmaceutical products.” I pointed out to the TTC that while I didn’t think it likely that anyone within the TTC would have reached out to Omnicom for advice specifically related to it’s (TTC’s) response to covid 19, I do think it’s possible that Omnicon, which would be on board with the project to push the biosecurity global police State onto humankind, would be on the look out to use whatever leverage it has with its clients to further that goal when and if the opportunity presented itself. I then asked the TTC very bluntly whether it is being advised on covid 19 by a company that doesn’t give a damn about human health.
 
Peter Phillips lists, on page 59 of his book, the areas targetted by the Transnational Capitalist Class for investment from its collective fund of some $41 trillion, and in that list we see vaccines. I’ve only complained once before to TTC (about a driver who complained to me that he didn’t like me getting on at the particular stop I was waiting at), using their online form and checking the box that you check if you’d like them to respond. I again checked the same box. They didn’t respond the first time that I complained to them and therefore they may not respond to me this time either. But if they do, I will be sharing their response with others, on external websites and on my blog.
 
I’ve always said that the capitalist’s model is: ‘dominate, dictate and take’, while capitalists’ motto is: ‘Take what you get, whether you like it or not and even if it harms you’. Is that wrong?
 

Arby
Arby
Jun 26, 2020 12:57 PM
Reply to  Arby

I didn’t tie my above comment into the quote from Colin’s article very well. I was trying to repeat something (below) that I had said to Vaccine Choice Canada in an email. I got that right. This is the part of my email to Vaccine Choice Canada that I didn’t properly convey in the comment above:
 
||.|
It just doesn’t surprise me that TTC is being abusive. I moved to TO in ’93 and I have always found the TTC to be abusive. With covid 1984 that abusiveness is off the charts. Then again, It’s off the charts everywhere right now. It doesn’t surprise me that TTC makes an appearance in Peter Phillips’s book, “Giants – The Global Power Elite.” There they are on page 281. They are shown to be a major client of Omnicon Group, a public relations propaganda (PRP) group, which, together with WPP and Interpublic Group “are key contributors to the total hegemony of capitalism in the world today.” So much for ‘publicly funded’. Obviously, the kind of guidance that the TTC will get from manipulators like Omnicom Group will be the kind of advice that leads only to outcomes that are in the best interests of special, capitalist interests. This is why I expect the TTC to be privatized eventually. As Colin Todhunter points out in his recent Off Guardian article, traitorous political leaders (and union leaders and mangers of publicly funded services) cater to “the imperatives of global capital, which requires nation states to curb spending so that private investors can occupy the arena left open.”
|.||

Robbobbobin
Robbobbobin
Jun 29, 2020 4:07 AM
Reply to  Arby

I’ve always said that the capitalist’s model is: ‘dominate, dictate and take’, while capitalists’ motto is: ‘Take what you get, whether you like it or not and even if it harms you’. Is that wrong?”

Yes, technically wrong: https://youtu.be/l75ptPUfzAw

Arby
Arby
Jun 29, 2020 7:13 AM
Reply to  Robbobbobin

That was funny. If only that was the only lunacy stemming from capitalists.

Tony
Tony
Jun 25, 2020 10:49 PM

Slightly offtopic, but here is Craig Murray, who our security services regular posters (and a few weirdos} want us all to believe is a security services asset, with a blog post eviscerating the BBC and it’s pro-Israel propaganda, Just like security services assets do.
 
https://www.craigmurray.org.uk/archives/2020/06/truly-shameful-bbc-israeli-propaganda/

Wilmers31
Wilmers31
Jun 28, 2020 7:08 AM
Reply to  Tony

We should probably discontinue the use of the word ‘security’ because it is another euphemism for war preparations. Security can mean all or nothing, but in politics it now stands for war preparations.

Arby
Arby
Jun 29, 2020 7:17 AM
Reply to  Tony

I asked him if he believed the pandemic was real and got no reply. I did have a comment disappeared there though. I can’t remember whether it was that one or not. Look, Anyone can spiritually fail. After watching Noam Chomsky defect, I am not surprised to see anyone go over to the dark side. Canadian Chomskys have done that. Dimitri Lascaris and Yves Engler – gone. Naomi Klein – gone. It’s a free universe.

George Mc
George Mc
Jun 25, 2020 7:59 PM

Off topic, but it does concern the Graundiag:
 
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2020/jun/25/keir-starmer-sacks-rebecca-long-bailey-from-shadow-cabinet
 

Keir Starmer has sacked Rebecca Long-Bailey as shadow education secretary after she tweeted praise for an interview in which the actor Maxine Peake said the US police tactic of kneeling on someone’s neck was taught by the Israeli secret service.

The Board of Deputies of British Jews had condemned Long-Bailey’s actions and called for her to delete the tweet and apologise. Long-Bailey sent a second tweet saying her praise was not “intended to be an endorsement of all aspects of the article”.

 
Note that she praised the interview which doesn’t necessarily imply that she was praising the controversial part of it – as she says herself.
 
I haven’t seen the Peake interview but this report seems to be getting a lot of repeats:
 

“I don’t know how we escape that cycle that’s indoctrinated into us all,” continues the 45-year-old. “Well, we get rid of it when we get rid of capitalism as far as I’m concerned. That’s what it’s all about. The establishment has got to go. We’ve got to change it.” Born in Bolton to a lorry driver father and care worker mother, Peake is strident and expressive; if religion wasn’t anathema to her, she’d be perfect in the pulpit. “Systemic racism is a global issue,” she adds. “The tactics used by the police in America, kneeling on George Floyd’s neck, that was learnt from seminars with Israeli secret services.”

 
Note the clear rejection of capitalism which, in the above report, is followed by the “anti-Semitic” part. I think we will see more of this easy conflation of anti-capitalism with anti-Semitism.
 
In any case I think the careers of Long-Bailey and Peake are over

bob
bob
Jun 25, 2020 8:36 PM
Reply to  George Mc

the labour party is DEAD
Starmer is a member of the Trilateral Commission that basically thinks the people are ‘above themselves’ and need showing who is boss!
Britain needs a new party/movement to condemn starmer and his ilk (have you seen who make up the opposition front bench?)
the alternative is the people are on their own

Grafter
Grafter
Jun 25, 2020 11:14 PM
Reply to  bob

the labour party is DEAD”. …..Agreed. When a millionaire with a title is their elected leader socialism is reduced to a word in the dictionary .

paul
paul
Jun 26, 2020 7:32 PM
Reply to  Grafter

A Labour MP used to get his butler to canvass for him. Or rather both his butlers, he had 2 butlers and both canvassed for him.

Nixon Scraypes
Nixon Scraypes
Jun 26, 2020 1:35 PM
Reply to  bob

New party, new promises, same paradigm. It’s the dad and pocket money syndrome. While the government has to go to privately owned banks for money ,they call the shots. Simple as that.

kevin
kevin
Jun 26, 2020 2:42 PM
Reply to  bob

His membership in the Trilateral Commission speaks volumes about whose interests he’s serving. Tony Blair attended Bilderberg when he was shadow home secretary, a year before becoming PM.

Tony
Tony
Jun 25, 2020 10:58 PM
Reply to  George Mc

She worked with Starmer’s office on a walk-through on this. But Starmer’s office later backtracked on the agreed walk-through, clearly because Starmer’s Board of Deputies handlers didn’t like it.

Wilmers31
Wilmers31
Jun 28, 2020 7:10 AM
Reply to  George Mc

Why do they not do as the Australian conservatives (LNP) and the Labor Party (ALP). When asked they just do not answer, zilch, nothing.

Enquiring Mind
Enquiring Mind
Jun 25, 2020 6:47 PM

Excellent article.

Tim Jenkins
Tim Jenkins
Jun 25, 2020 6:13 PM

Great food for thought CT, today; and exactly what some of us have been ‘preaching’,
for many decades.

For those who wish to contest, clearly their knowledge of food/ENERGY and the science of ANY battery’s lifespan is extremely limited to selfish self interest… rather like the mass slaughter of Buffalos by the yanks!

When you KILL and slaughter recklessly, more than you personally need to survive and charge your battery, who the fuck are you, looking down the barrel of a loaded gun… ? Learn inherent respect,
For others’ needs, because one wise person once said “those who live by the sword, die by the Sword…” blunt corporate swords, not to fear, unless yer’ Brainwashed.

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Jun 25, 2020 6:02 PM

Major incident declared as nutcases take over The Gwaridian, declare themselves journalists, start posting shit.
Today’s headlines:
 

  • Major incident declared as people flock to England’s south coast (lots of people go to Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole) 
  • Abattoir air cooling systems could pose Covid-19 risks, expert warns (after the cruise ships and lockdowns?) 
  • Extinction Rebellion activists launch UK Beyond Politics party by stealing food – Robin Hood-style (Well-heeled types in Camden, London, say ‘poverty sucks’)
  • Boris Johnson wants Britain to go to the pub – and forget about the 65,700 dead (I didn’t have to tell you that last one was Owen Jones.) 

 
100% full fat fact check: The headlines are real. Content cannot be vouched for.

Tim Jenkins
Tim Jenkins
Jun 25, 2020 6:47 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

Not doubting you. Content? What content? Surely contentious, Mc…
Crisis? What CRISIS?

What a circus: ich bin ein Berliner, (doughnut) , so just try one bite, sweet & full of air holes, whilst checking that your medical insurance covers you for diabetes and SUCK BS , instead of
Balancing Your diet.

Poverty of the mind, as a direct consequence of the dumbing down of all & any society,
For corporate goals to control ‘everything-everything’…
SS
ND,
SAME SHIT, NEW DAY… crisis, what crisis?
Crisis of critical thinking, without content !
A pointless exercise of any mind.
Especially, guardian
SCUM !

jess
jess
Jun 26, 2020 2:24 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

slaughter house workers always have suffered ill effects. alcholism, domestic violence etc. there is a video about the freemason leadbeater talking about the dark energy effecting cities like chicago. it is natural law that the terror comes back round. it ties back to pharma since most ‘vaccines’ are used on farm animals.

Wilmers31
Wilmers31
Jun 28, 2020 7:16 AM
Reply to  jess

Check German Tönnies.
 
Germany has also been fully Americanized. I am glad I saw the obnoxious developments 37 years ago and left. Unfortunately Australia has not resisted Americanization enough, although it’s still better than Britain and Germany.

Grafter
Grafter
Jun 25, 2020 5:52 PM

The people of India are some of the most tolerant, kind and obliging human beings on the planet. Unfortunately they can be the target of the more unscrupulous and devious specimens of the human race who would seek to use and take advantage of them. Just ask Bill Gates.

Calamity Jane
Calamity Jane
Jun 25, 2020 8:15 PM
Reply to  Grafter

Grafter culturally Indians are generally very “class based” need to feel superior and people who live there find many can be very rude in that respect .
Indians are like all other human beings no more kind or tolerant .
All human beings have kindness in them along with unkindness its what we practice we get good at .
People can’t be accurately lumped into one lump concept of nationalization/culture/beliefs.
 

Grafter
Grafter
Jun 25, 2020 11:09 PM
Reply to  Calamity Jane

CJ if you wish to discuss class based systems look no further than here in the UK where although not based on religion is quite insidious in relation to power structures and societal control. Your subjective view of India differs from mine and I comment from my own experience of those I have met personally. I was not “lumping” anyone into a system of set beliefs whether it be national or cultural etc. Your sweeping generalisation that we are all alike when it comes to tolerance and unkindness is false. I suggest you read up on recent world events where America is league leader when it comes to aggressive intolerance.

Howard
Howard
Jun 25, 2020 4:57 PM

It would appear that almost every nation on Earth is fast in the grips of the global economic cabal; and cannot possibly extricate themselves. But that isn’t true – not yet.
 
Until such time that mercenary forces outnumber standing armies, the cabal remains dependent on the nation states themselves to enforce its rule. So, in theory, the nations hold the most crucial cards in the game. In theory, too, the cabal could be stripped of its funny money and sent packing.
 
Not likely though, right? That is, unless the masses stand up and make it happen.

Calamity Jane
Calamity Jane
Jun 25, 2020 8:03 PM
Reply to  Howard

They banking cabal have mercenary forces ( including control over nations armies)ie X Blackwater and other astro turf groups.
Its more that people do not know or understand the system.
They believe in the democracy dogma and that they have capitalism.
Believers not knowers.
Its the inner revolution we need first otherwise people will continued to be controlled by their conditioned minds( full of beliefs, fear, greed, ignorance= dis-empowered).
The “mercenary thing” was done in Seattle to no good end.
 

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Jun 25, 2020 3:47 PM

O/T How many children did Jeffrey Epstein have? Tasteless, sorry, just to get your attention. It’s important to keep the story in front of us.
 
Latest developments: June 25, 2020 – CNN reports that Epstein’s victims can start filing claims against his estate this week.
 
Jeffrey Epstein for years said he hoped to seed the human race with his DNA. “Epstein is said to have had sex three times a day for decades.” – in the lingo of the currant bun. So odds being odds… https://epsteinheirs.com/ is trying to build a list of claimants to Epstein’s estate is valued at a measly $600 million.
 
Apr 24, 2020 – Epstein’s chef Andy Stewart died suddenly just as Maria Farmer’s lawyers were seeking to subpoena him… Not to be confused with Alfredo Rodriguez, who was Epstein’s houseman for many years, who died of a fast-acting cancer in 2015.
 
Shaun Attwood has stayed on the case, interviewing Maria Farmer in May http://jonsjailjournal.blogspot.com/2020/05/ivana-trump-procuring-with-ghislaine.html
 
Whitney Webb explores the broader Mega Group, organized crime, Roy Cohn connection on It’s the Empire, Stupid. She reports that, bizarrely, Ghislaine is writing a book. https://www.spreaker.com/user/9119584/empire-episode62-whitneywebb
 
 

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Jun 25, 2020 6:34 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

Jun 22, 2020 – Steve Bing, 55, movie producer, philanthropist, donor to Democrat causes, friend of Bill Clinton and Jeffrey Epstein, dies in fall from LA building.
 
“The death was apparently a suicide. Police and the coroner’s office confirmed he had jumped or fallen from a Century City building where he had a 27th-floor apartment. Sources told TMZ he had been suffering from depression…. A 2002 Los Angeles Times article described him as a “high-profile Hollywood libertine,” saying, “He is a man dedicated apparently in equal measures to philanthropy, politics and women.” — The Mercury News
 
“Several names came up when they were around: Epstein, supermarket magnate Ron Burkle, film financier Steve Bing, and former president Bill Clinton, then in the prime of his postpresidential career and flying around on Epstein’s jet, dubbed the Lolita Express, or Burkle’s jet, dubbed Air F___ One.” — Vanity Fair: “I Collect People, I Own People, I Can Damage People”: The Curious Sociopathy of Jeffrey Epstein
 
Bing inherited about $600 million from his grandfather at the age of 18, and was known as much for his private planes (which he lent to Bill Clinton) and for partying lifestyle as for his career as a movie producer.
 
As a political patron Bing donated money to Hillary’s campaign, and at least $10 million to the Clinton Foundation. 

Tim Jenkins
Tim Jenkins
Jun 25, 2020 7:51 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

Yo Mc, really getting to like most of your comments and train of thought.

Have you ever researched the Mega Group’s origins, seriously?

Ghislaine (if we could find & ask), has many many questions to answer,
On behalf of her beloved father. Just research… ‘PROMIS’ and its’ tour,
Around the World…! Before reaching NYC 😉 . Prism’s forerunner, actually.
Here in Bg. Mega Security rocks… Mega Cot (pronounced Sot, sleep tight & soddem’ , imho, lol)
In my grandfather’s old 1946 Odhams English dictionary, a Bugger is defined first and foremost,
as “a Bulgarian Heretic”… interesting fact, widely totally unknown, under milk wood.
Rather like, “Llareggub” , English ignorant education systems for suckers. 🙂

Wilmers31
Wilmers31
Jun 28, 2020 7:31 AM
Reply to  Tim Jenkins

As an American citizen, Ghislaine must pay tax and now ex-pat tax. They know where she was and now is.

Wilmers31
Wilmers31
Jun 28, 2020 7:27 AM
Reply to  Moneycircus

Pardonnez-moi, that should be distasteful, not tasteless.
 
Ghislaine is writing a book? Would she include that her father’s stolen millions (from the pension accounts) was to be her start capital in New York and she made it Epstein’s start capital, too? He was apparently not wealthy before.
 
Of course she’d write some tales to distract, or more likely they provide ghost writers to do that for her. The premises in New York, Paris, Florida, New Mexico and the islands were far too large to be just love nests for a handful of people. They look like training facilities for secret people to me.
 
Ghislaine must pay expat tax. The authorities DO know where she is.

Arby
Arby
Jun 25, 2020 1:13 PM

“On a macro level, economist Prabhat Patnaik argues that India must…” India? From the standpoint of those who own, rule and ruin the world, India, the geographical region, is doing just fine. What are the people going to do about that? Nothing. Most are cattle, as they are everywhere. The ones that aren’t are gangsters. And you can be bovine ‘and’ criminal.

TFS
TFS
Jun 25, 2020 11:25 AM

There we were chasing the dream of Democracy and Freedom for the last 100 years with Political Parties and the like, when really we were being sold into debt slavery as renters to the unelected, unaccountable Central Banking Mafia Cartel.
 
Past US Presidents have warned us, but keeping the masses fighting amongst themselves was an Exceptional move on their part.
 
 

S Cooper
S Cooper
Jun 25, 2020 12:51 PM
Reply to  TFS

Speaking of FREE TRADE here is a piece from Global Research Canada on the narcotics trade and the ROYAL MAFIA CRIME FAMILY. India plays a large part in it. The trade continues still. The Cocaine Importers of America (CIA) is the largest drug crime syndicate in the World today.
 
Odd is not that when the Taliban Government in Afghanistan announced they were stopping poppy production Afghanistan was invaded, under pretext of 911. It is occupied still. Who does one think are guarding those fields?
 
 
https://www.globalresearch.ca/colonial-drug-trafficking-and-the-british-empire/5716926

TFS
TFS
Jun 25, 2020 2:23 PM
Reply to  S Cooper

I believe the Afghans/Taliban were invited to America and given the ‘special treatment’ before the invasion began.

I wonder how the Americans broached the subject of the drug trafficking, sorry Banking Liquidity? I’m guessing they didn’t take the hint.

Wilmers31
Wilmers31
Jun 28, 2020 7:36 AM
Reply to  TFS

They had good relations through an Afghan government in exile.
 
Governments in exile are tools to initiate regime change when the regime is not obedient enough. There was also a Libyan government in exile which got the civil war there going. Since Africom came to Stuttgart things have gone from bad to worse.

elsewhere
elsewhere
Jun 25, 2020 10:45 AM

 
The can is now too big to kick down the road:
 
https://goldswitzerland.com/can-too-big-for-fed-ecb/
 
ALL EMPIRES END WITH COLLAPSING CURRENCY AND SURGING DEBTS
 
Some quotes:
 
If you want to understand the future, don’t spend your life preparing and constantly revising an Excel sheet with masses of economic data. Collective human behaviour is extremely predictable. But not by spreadsheet analysis but by studying history.
 
Coronavirus is a convenient excuse but not the cause of the current problems. CV was a catalyst but the real crisis this time started in Aug-Sep 2019 with the Fed and ECB panicking.
 
The real problem is excessive debt at all levels of the economy, sovereign, corporate, financial, and personal. Governments and CBs have created the debt and are now desperately trying to remedy their mistake by doing more of the thing that created it all.
The $18T stimulus that has just been created is not real money. It is monopoly money that might be useful if you play the Monopoly board game but it has zero value in the real world. So throwing $18T of fake money at $275T global debt (which can’t be repaid either) might fool some people for a few weeks. It is certainly fooling retail stock investors who are being lured into the biggest suckers’ rally in history. They will soon have the shock of a lifetime.
 
Whether we finish with an explosion or implosion makes little difference to the end result. We could have a hyperinflationary explosion first, which I believe is more likely. But that would soon end in a depressionary and deflationary implosion. This will take the world back at least 50 years in production and trade terms and thus also in the standard of living. But before the decline stops, there will be massive financial and human suffering in the world, including social unrest and probably wars.

Tim Jenkins
Tim Jenkins
Jun 25, 2020 8:12 PM
Reply to  elsewhere

Elsewhere, take heart… invest in ‘Hertz’ 🙂

paul
paul
Jun 26, 2020 7:40 PM
Reply to  Tim Jenkins

That famous Dutchman, Hertz Van Rental. Great bloke.

Tim Jenkins
Tim Jenkins
Jun 27, 2020 2:25 PM
Reply to  paul

Chuckle 🙂

kenny_the_pict
kenny_the_pict
Jun 25, 2020 9:34 AM

….this article is yet more confirmation of my view that the co-ordinated and long planned assault on “Humanity” has gained worrying momentum…what is the first stage of the problem resolution process? ..define the problem…this phase requires the collation of all available data and a totally unbiased approach…i’ve yet to see our enemy embrace this process…from data that i have absorbed [and considering the perspective expressed in this article – everything is dependant upon “funding” and “economic models”], i postulate that the “problem” we face is the “belief” in “Money” and “Government”….what value do these entities add to the process..? i suggest that they are the problem….just a thought..!!

Donald Duck
Donald Duck
Jun 25, 2020 9:24 AM

Every time I hear the phrase ‘free-market’ I cringe. In fact markets were not, are not, and never will be ‘free’ This ‘state-denialism’ has formed a central part of the hyper-globalist central claim over the past 40 years that we live in a borderless world where states no longer matter. It is argued that a combination of revolutionary technologies of transport, communication and the increasing power of transnational companies (TNCs) have shifted economic power out of the control of nation-states to the market. This Market Fundamentalism – a neoliberal agenda urging a reduction of state involvement in the economy, the privatisation of state economic and social assets, lower direct taxation, unfettered movement of financial movements, a reduction of the state’s social welfare role-became the mantra in the US and UK … See free market ideology formed the basis of what was to become known as the ‘Washington Consensus’ a set of views that exerted immense influence in both developed and more especially in developing countries.
 
However, the cataclysmic events of 2008 and now 2020 which have stunned the global economy has seen a dramatic reversal in the apparently unchallenged dominance of the ‘free market’ and a revival of the view that states really do matter. The moment of truth came in the financial sector where the masters of the universe had to go on bended knee to the state to be rescued, but also in such industries as auto-vehicles. Governments around the world poured millions of dollars, pounds, euros into propping up the financial sector and in some cases this amounted little short of outright nationalization a bete noire of market fundamentalism … The state is back.
 
The fact is, however, that it never really went away … The state remains unquestionably a most significant force in shaping the world economy, despite the hyper-globalist rhetoric. it has always played a fundmental role in the economic development of all countries, and indeed in the process of globalization itself. After all, and increased facility to transcend geographical distance made possible by transportation and communication technologies is of little use if their are political barriers to such movements. An important enabling factor underlying globalization therefore, has been the progressive reduction in political barriers to flows of commodities, capital, finance, labour and other services.In fact the more powerful states have used globalization as a means of increasing their power.
 
This state-capitalist/mercantilism has been known from the time of Alexander Hamilton and Freiderich List in the 19th century and East Asia in the 20/21 centuries, and has always been the propelling factor in economic development.

S Cooper
S Cooper
Jun 25, 2020 12:34 PM
Reply to  Donald Duck

When the corporate fascist oligarch mobster psychopath parasites say FREE they mean free for them. For everyone else it means slavery.
 
“We do not have choices. We have owners. They own us.”

bob
bob
Jun 25, 2020 9:23 AM

I have to ask this question to be true to myself – has Off-guardian been got at?

Tim Jenkins
Tim Jenkins
Jun 26, 2020 11:13 PM
Reply to  bob

Why would you suggest that, Bob?

Personally, I consider this particular journalist as a valid & valuable expression of my long held beliefs, after many decades of both corporate & military intelligence analysis, professionally.

Simples:-
What’s your ‘beef’ Bob?
Spit it out & remain true…

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Jun 25, 2020 8:53 AM

Commodity Traders have been in the shadows for a decade: that may be about to change:
 
World’s biggest cobalt trader Glencore faces new bribery and corruption inquiry (June 2020) over DRC by the Swiss prosecutors office, the US DoJ and Britain’s Serious Fraud Office. https://www.livemint.com/companies/news/swiss-prosecutors-launch-glencore-criminal-probe-over-congo-11592656703894.html
 
Glencore mines copper and cobalt from Congo, where former partner and Israeli billionaire businessman Dan Gertler… used his friendship with former DRC President Joseph Kabila to secure sweetheart mining deals.
 
Scotland to phase out petrol and diesel vehicles by 2032, UK by 2040.
Electric cars use lithium-ion batteries containing cobalt.
More than 20% of DRC cobalt comes from ‘freelance’ miners – Amnesty.
Unregulated ‘artisanal’ mines are much cheaper than industrial mines.
 
Elon Musk claims he monitors the supply chain for compliance – yet the price of his cobalt is magically falling as of June 2020: The financials of the deal are unknown but a ton of cobalt is worth about $30,000, down from $95,000 in May 2018. https://www.cnbc.com/2020/06/16/tesla-glencore-cobalt-gigafactory.html
 

Jelly
Jelly
Jun 25, 2020 8:51 AM

AMERICA and the Throttling of Democracy in India 
See……it’s easy, I made it right for you.
 

Dors
Dors
Jun 25, 2020 8:23 AM

Genuine food security in principle derives from food sovereignty, which, in a very broad sense, is based on the right of peoples and sovereign states to democratically determine their own agricultural and food policies.
 
We had that. It ended in world wars, and the resulting famines. In response to those tragedies, the greatest minds of humanity, Albert Einstein and Bertrand Russell and HG Wellls, called for world government.
 
That the idea of world government is treated with contempt reflexively, without any reasoned argument, speaks for itself.
 
It may be that its opponents need help, like this…
 
Q: What is the worst thing that can happen in life?
 
A : war.
 
Q: From that, does it not follow that the highest priority is prevention of war?
 
And is it not right to prevent war the way it was envisaged by the greatest minds of mankind? Ok, that’s a little authoritarian… but we want to make sure steps, don’t we. Has anyone made a compelling argument against them?
 
No.
 
Then, for the sake of peace, the evident massive manipulations of the masses are morally justified. They’re justified for the purpose of securing the long-term future of humanity. The threat of a nuclear self-destruction continues to hang over mankind.
 
And if you are a believer in democracy… look around you, in real life as well as online. I will concede that an authoritarian world government is wrong … for as much as you can point me to examples of constructive democratic collaboration.
 
And if you tell me how it is obstructed on every step…
 
You’re eating the cake you want to take. You can’t say that you were for ages under a totalitarian control, and that you’re alarmed at losing your freedoms. Decide on a single, consistent narrative.
 
The struggle to assert genuine self-determination and democratic development in India involves challenging the dominance of private (international) capital.
 
Good for them that there is such struggle in India. Outside India, it’s almost completely absent.
 
And that should be a topic for analysis, rather than just a reason for feeling sad or sorry.
 
It’s the fake left that merely feels. Serious, mature people are able to analyse ruthlessly.
 
 
 

</playing the devil’s advocate>

 
 
 
 

richard
richard
Jun 25, 2020 4:57 PM
Reply to  Dors

I take it you have read 1984?

Howard
Howard
Jun 25, 2020 5:14 PM
Reply to  Dors

You overlook one crucial factor: the global cabal and would be government does not necessarily want peace. War has always been the default position of those wishing to increase their wealth and power.
 
The crucial difference is that the globalists can pick and choose where to have their wars, whereas the old fashioned nation-state paradigm simply pitted one state, or empire, against its nearest neighbor in a bid to gain territory.
 
The global paradigm has turned a brisk game of “Risk” into a frenetic game of “Dominoes.”

Edwige
Edwige
Jun 25, 2020 8:03 AM

Modi doing a freemasonic hand signal there.

Jenny
Jenny
Jun 25, 2020 8:02 AM

‘Capitalism and the Throttling of Democracy in India’ 
should read
 
America and the Throttling of Democracy in India 

 
 

Calamity Jane
Calamity Jane
Jun 25, 2020 7:53 AM

Yip john Ervin I agree its oligarchy propaganda ” Democracy and Capitalism” neither concept exists. Except in the minds of mind conditioned believers.

Jenny
Jenny
Jun 25, 2020 8:03 AM
Reply to  Calamity Jane

It has nothing to do with ‘Oligarchy’, it is empire…….. Americans Empire.

steadydirt
steadydirt
Jun 25, 2020 2:00 PM
Reply to  Jenny

most ‘rich’ countries have crooks

Calamity Jane
Calamity Jane
Jun 25, 2020 7:46 PM
Reply to  Jenny

Nope Jenny its more like the British Empire( Crown corporation)
https://eyreinternational.wordpress.com/2013/03/18/the-new-world-order-part-1/

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jun 25, 2020 7:08 PM
Reply to  Calamity Jane

I admit any use of the word “democracy” appears after further review to be uninformed commentary, at least in hindsight, since there are many luminaries who once believed in it.

What did they know, huh?

A deeper study of voting process, especially since electronic machines took over, would tell them that the vote is more a “consolation prize” for the under-informed. What they used to call a “booby prize”.

But, fragile as the concept is when put in practice, I think it would still be the ideal that those luminaries I named would vote for. It’s been fragile since Cleisthenes first tried it thousands of years ago in Greece.

One things for real sure: democatic solcialism us not an oxymoron, but democratic capitalism sure is. It is what the satirist was seeing when he said:

“Democracy is two wolves and a lamb getting together to decide what’s for lunch.”

It is my strong conviction that there is only one true Oligarch who really believes in Democracy:

God. And thank God for that Precedent!

It is up to the rest of us to help make it happen.

Zinn said something which goes a long way, something like: “Voting is fairly easy
and relatively useful, but it is a poor substitute for democracy which takes direct action by concerned citizens.”

Of course, that presupposes the opportunity — which the High Cabal in USA Inc. studiously eliminate as best they can, and have worked hard at that project, at least: keeping people so busy doing busywork and chasing their tails, when not just as busy being brainwashed by ubiquitous propaganda, it’s hard for me to not give the common yank a provisional hall pass.

But that just doesn’t mean we have to
use it!

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Jun 25, 2020 7:41 AM

Well said: “Genuine food security… derives from food sovereignty”.
 
Going Off-Grid? Hoping to live your own life? Sustainable Sharecropper? You are in a war, whether you live in India or Indianapolis.
 
Centrally controlled perfect information awareness is not the farmer’s saviour. It is his enemy. The propaganda push is ramping up ‘Cos Covid.
 
Those behind Smart Farming and Internet of Things say the advantage is not just safety but traceability and transparency – that’s according to Walmart and IBM. Behind them you will see the military driving this initiative, led by former Google CEO Eric Schmidt who now works at the Pentagon.
 
Forbes magazine writes a lot about AI and Blockchain in agriculture – but never getting beneath the surface. It reads more like cheerleading, with words like ‘transform’ without any qualifier, as if trans, yay! Who cares what it transforms into, eh.
 
My BullShit Detector goes off… this is clearly NOT the main objective of using AI and blockchain tech in farming. Read closely and you’ll see the lies and cover stories: AI is going to allow virtual bee hives …. tractors will identify each individual weed before deciding how to spray (that is not how Monsanto works) …. allowing the instruments on land to measure moisture, air, amount of sun… (as if farmers don’t do that already). Those are all real fake Forbes stories.
 
What it does allow is Contact Tracing down to the farm and warehouse – allowing total surveillance, social engineering and policing of dissent. Total allocation of wealth and managed outcomes. The game will be fixed: who wins, who loses.
 
5G feeds into this… June 11th, 20202, FCC Passes 5G Upgrade Order, Aimed at Lifting Rural Broadband. https://www.govtech.com/network/FCC-Passes-5G-Upgrade-Order-Aimed-at-Lifting-Rural-Broadband.html
 
IRS has already used the tax system to attack dissidents and political opponents. Paypal and Visa have withdrawn services from those whose opinions the liberal elite do not like.
 
What if Fairtrade International gets too radical. What if the Government wants to present itself as the peasant’s friend, and Fairtrade becomes inconvenient competition? Big Competitor wants to steal your customers? Each one of them is identified and can be made an offer.
 
I know how Big Food works. I’ve sat in the classroom with the top buyers for Tesco and Sainsbury. I’ve also talked to the small wine growers. I’ll post separately. But it is nothing to do with wholesome or best-quality. It is about volume aimed at a price point.

Moneycircus
Moneycircus
Jun 25, 2020 6:49 AM

Corporations & Military taking control of food supply chain.
Global trade deals revived, starting with UK: farmers warn it will break them.
Small farmers struggling to break even after lockdown.
Media openly promoting “eat corporatist” – Taco Tuesday trending see recent post
 
Ice Age Farmer http://www.iceagefarmer.com/ does an excellent job on the food system back story – this is worth a closer look.
“Forces are working to take total control of every drop of oil extracted from the ground, every fish caught from the sea, and every last bean harvested. It requires an immense technical infrastructure comprising 5G, blockchain, and Artificial Intelligence. This infrastructure has been built and is now being deployed, and we must understand that it is — in the very words of the Department of Defense — an AI weapons system.”


Tim Jenkins
Tim Jenkins
Jun 26, 2020 8:44 PM
Reply to  Moneycircus

Tip of the iceberg, Mc, tip of the iceberg… been trying to warn people since long before any Bitcoin or BDL blockchain distributed ledger ever OFFICIALLY existed… and when you analyse V.W. , their CEO and his specific intentions of manipulating legal emission controls and TESTS, at extremely specific revolutions, with NOXIOUS gasses, OBVIATED… need i really amplify for you?
I guess not. 😉

Ernest Reimer
Ernest Reimer
Jun 25, 2020 5:37 AM

This is really good! But “taking our cue from the world’s indigenous peoples” isn’t as simple as saying “hey, let’s do that.” Because, in Canada, if we “do that” we’ll all starve in short order. And don’t read into this the wrong way. One of my best friends is full blood Cree and she understands the problems and challenges better than anyone I know. But I think I get the idea, and if what I’m getting is what you’re saying, I’m all for it….

Calamity Jane
Calamity Jane
Jun 25, 2020 3:46 AM

What capitalism?
We have an economic monopoly.
 
All of the central bank nations borrow money with interest from commercial banks .
With the bankers govt contractions our economy is choked off.The shut down economies do this and cause a recession/depression/reset.
Even the increased govt borrowing ( for ” COVID” costs )when it all goes to govt and 1% it does not help the people it just makes the bankers and the Rockerfellers and rothschilds wealthier.
 
The economic and political system we have is called banksterism.
 
And don’t get me started on the democracy dogma .
Do you really think you get to choose?
You looked for and selected people for leaders like Bush, Nixon, Obama, Blair, Trumps doppelgänger Johnson etc
Democracy means rule by the people if the people are have a leader how can they rule?!!!
Its a cruel joke on us really.

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jun 25, 2020 5:18 AM
Reply to  Calamity Jane

“The problem with Capitalism is that there are not nearly enough capitalists.”.

–Chesterton

Whenever I hear phrases like “free markets” I remind the source that all such terms are nothing more nor less than oligarchic propaganda and what we’ve had for decades is pure Monopolism posing for a come-on as “free enterprise” for any sucker who will buy or, simply, pay.

George Mc
George Mc
Jun 25, 2020 10:37 AM
Reply to  John Ervin

I’m guessing that Chesterton meant that capitalism would “work” if everyone was a capitalist. But I don’t see how that could be. Capitalists vie with each other on a profit maximisation basis. Inevitably some win and some lose. And we end up with a concentration of wealth and tendency towards monopoly.

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jun 25, 2020 1:02 PM
Reply to  George Mc

GKC is a good deal more nuanced than what the bare quote might imply, and I posted it partly, and barely, as an invitation to that kind of guess, since the thread of the thought is as thorny as he is thoughtful (the eminent Thomist philosopher Étienne Gilson called Chesterton “one of the deepest thinkers of all time”). Christopher Hitchens spent his last hours, as he was dying of throat cancer, in a long and studious review of Fr. Ian Ker’s biography of GKC, alternately praising and mocking him, my own guess being that he was challenged enough by the depth of the subject that he never quite came to terms with him. Whatever the verdict, he knew an awful lot about Chesterton, for our resident national atheist, and admitted that his friend Martin Amis made a point, or a habit, of re-reading “The Man Who Was Thursday” once each year. (Last I checked a few years ago,The Atlantic had that at its website, “The Reactionary: the charming, the sinister G. K. Chesterton”.)

Something else he wrote may further iluminate those depths, and I find it a useful “Chestertonian” epithet, good as he was at summarizing in a brief bon mot, “The practical tendency of all trade and commerce today is to form big combinations, which are often more impersonal, more imperial, and more international, than many a communist commonwealth”.

He foresaw quite plainly the inexorable “tendency towards monopoly”, to quote somebody not named G.K. Chesterton.

In a phrase, to quote even myself, which is reaching low but at least integrative, “Oligarchic Monopolism”.

Possibly the Worst of all Worlds, or at least way too dependent on the curious global whims of a dubious elite, such as the Koch’s, Gates’, and Walton Gang’s.

GKC addressed those binds as well, another illustrative “raccourci”: “The difference between the ideal socialist system, where government runs business, and the present Capitalist system, where business runs government, is often far less than most people suppose.”

He also saw the limitations of “really-existing” socialism when he said that there was some naiveté among even its best proponents as to its dependent need for really superior leaders to make it succeed.

But my own personal, simple rule of thumb has been, since I first began reading him a half century passed, I’ll take a thin socialism over a thick capitalism any day, at all.

MLK, RFK, Einstein, Helen Keller and many others of their pound for pound value and star status, were democratic socialists and if it’s good enough for the likes of them, it’s good enough for me.

Chesterton was definitely a democrat (“democracy is a bit like blowing one’s nose: one may not do it very well, but one feels one should do it oneself”) a fact which the American conservatives who (pretend to) embrace him for their own ideological agendas studiously ignore, but he was not a socialist, rather a Distributist, which Hitchens sneered currently had about “70 members worldwide” but I suspect if he were he here today he would lean more to the left (hopefully without altering centers of gravity, as a NYC wag said of his arrival in his port, as affecting the same on the ocean liner that brought him here, poor giant). His sympathies were more along the lines of Reinhold Niebuhr, who was an icon of Martin Luther King in his perspective on many of these issues.

Neither a Chestertonian, nor a Marxist, I find what I know of both schools of thought really useful as metrics to triangulate my way through a sinister Covid World, in progress.

And the Capitalism therein is a Beast with a Monopolist heart, kin to a Beowulfian dragon –notably SMAUG, in character– so such triangulation might be life-saving, these days, for any and all pilgrims, as much as I would rather be just making “mere” music.

~~~~~~~~~~£4£&$4$+my2¢

“Government belongs wherever evil needs an adversary and there are people in distress.”. –RFK, Sr.

George Mc
George Mc
Jun 25, 2020 1:24 PM
Reply to  John Ervin

I’ve always had a kinda love/hate relationship with GKC – and I’m guessing that may even be the norm for many! He was a wonderful writer and indeed had a gift for metaphor at least the equal of that old curmudgeon Schopenhauer. His book “Orthodoxy” has a marvellous reference to the sun and moon as different systems of thought – the moon being utterly clear and “logical” but the cause of “lunatics” to whom it gives its name, and the sun being the one thing you cannot look at but the one thing you need to look at everything else. (Obvious parallel with religion there!)
 
On the downside, he did have a tiresome tendency to grind out slick paradoxes and it’s hard to avoid the feeling he had a kind of inner production line for them.
 
His Father Brown stories are wonderful and the recent TV series an abomination! I’m not one to usually make a big issue out of political correctness but in this case, it’s downright obscene! Father Brown without the religion!
 
GK certainly had a complex approach towards politics. I recall one of the FB stories featuring a communist who you are led to believe is the villain – and it turns out he isn’t!
 
Mind you, I also recall now that the second FB story was a bit of a let-down since the first featured a potentially fruitful “odd couple” team of FB and an atheist policeman (naturally French!) but in that second story, GK kills off the policeman by having him as the actual villain in a ludicrously convoluted plot involving swapped decapitated heads where the whole reason for the crime was the Frenchman’s hatred of religion!  
 
Interesting about Christopher Hitchens being a “fan”. Borges liked GKC too. I tend to re-read GK occasionally. Time for a reacquaintance I think!
 

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jun 25, 2020 1:14 PM
Reply to  George Mc

GKC is a good deal more nuanced than what the bare quote might imply, and I posted it partly, and barely, as an invitation to that kind of guess, since the thread of the thought is as thorny as he is thoughtful (the eminent Thomist philosopher Étienne Gilson called Chesterton “one of the deepest thinkers of all time”). Christopher Hitchens spent his last hours, as he was dying of throat cancer, in a long and studious review of Fr. Ian Ker’s biography of GKC, alternately praising and mocking him, my own guess being that he was challenged enough by the depth of the subject that he never quite came to terms with him. Whatever the verdict, he knew an awful lot about Chesterton, for our resident national atheist, and admitted that his friend Martin Amis made a point, or a habit, of re-reading “The Man Who Was Thursday” once each year. (Last I checked a few years ago,The Atlantic had that at its website, “The Reactionary: the charming, the sinister G. K. Chesterton”.)

Something else he wrote may further iluminate those depths, and I find it a useful “Chestertonian” epithet, good as he was at summarizing in a brief bon mot, “The practical tendency of all trade and commerce today is to form big combinations, which are often more impersonal, more imperial, and more international, than many a communist commonwealth”.

He foresaw quite plainly the inexorable “tendency towards monopoly”, to quote somebody not named G.K. Chesterton.

In a phrase, to quote even myself, which is reaching low but at least integrative, “Oligarchic Monopolism”.

Possibly the Worst of all Worlds, or at least way too dependent on the curious global whims of a dubious elite, such as the Koch’s, Gates’, and Walton Gang’s.

GKC addressed those binds as well, another illustrative “raccourci”: “The difference between the ideal socialist system, where government runs business, and the present Capitalist system, where business runs government, is often far less than most people suppose.”

He also saw the limitations of “really-existing” socialism when he said that there was some naiveté among even its best proponents as to its dependent need for really superior leaders to make it succeed.

But my own personal, simple rule of thumb has been, since I first began reading him a half century passed, I’ll take a thin socialism over a thick capitalism any day, at all.

MLK, RFK, Einstein, Helen Keller and many others of their pound for pound value and star status, were democratic socialists and if it’s good enough for the likes of them, it’s good enough for me.

Chesterton was definitely a democrat (“democracy is a bit like blowing one’s nose: one may not do it very well, but one feels one should do it oneself”) a fact which the American conservatives who (pretend to) embrace him for their own ideological agendas studiously ignore. But he was not a socialist, rather a Distributist, which Hitchens lately sneered “currently has about 70 members worldwide” but I suspect if he were here today he would lean much more to the left (hopefully not too impulsively, without altering centers of gravity, as a NYC wag said of his arrival in his port, as affecting the same on the ocean liner that brought him here, poor giant). His sympathies were more along the lines of Reinhold Niebuhr, who was an icon of Martin Luther King in his perspective on many of these issues.

Neither a Chestertonian, nor a Marxist, I find what even little I know of both schools of thought really useful as metrics to triangulate my way through a sinister Covid World, in progress.

And the Capitalism therein is a Beast with a Monopolist heart, kin to a Beowulfian dragon –notably SMAUG, in character– so such triangulation might be life-saving these days for any and all pilgrims, as much as I would rather be just making “mere” music.

~~~~~~~~~~£4£&$4$+my2¢

“Government belongs wherever evil needs an adversary and there are people in distress.”. –RFK, Sr

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jun 25, 2020 1:23 PM
Reply to  John Ervin

GEN’L DISCLAIMER: The citations may not be verbatim but are close enough that a paste and search will make them, and bear my “Good Quoting Seal of Approval”.

George Mc
George Mc
Jun 25, 2020 1:44 PM
Reply to  John Ervin

Well here’s an odd thing. I have replied to your post but OffG have put in a message that says my post is “Awaiting for approval”. New censorship? Spooky!

steadydirt
steadydirt
Jun 25, 2020 2:09 PM
Reply to  George Mc

perhaps winning capitalists are called capitalists, losing capitalists are out of the ‘game’ and are called poor. A capitalist needs many poor to become rich.

George Mc
George Mc
Jun 25, 2020 2:59 PM
Reply to  steadydirt

Basically yes. I was just adopting the capitalist apologetic view there i.e. adopting their own rhetoric. But I think Marx was right in thinking that all profit is produced by exploitation.

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jun 25, 2020 6:22 PM
Reply to  George Mc

Implied:

“Profits are what you make when you’re not working.”

–Michael Parenti

Therein seems to be the”mechanism” that creates the problem: the ever-increasing alienation of worker from the work.

And that effect is the deeper social problem. It seems to lead to what USAmerica causes as a pandemic, as the world’s first “undeveloping” country, as “barefoot economist” Manfred Max-Neef calls us.

George Mc
George Mc
Jun 25, 2020 7:21 PM
Reply to  John Ervin

USAmerica ….as the world’s first “undeveloping” country

 
Oh that’s good! I must remember that one! Although I recall reading in the footnotes of Chomsky’s Understanding Power how, through controlling imports and exports, India was “ruralised” by the British in the early 19th century. So perhaps India should have the title of first undeveloping country? (Which takes us back to the current article)
 

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jun 25, 2020 7:46 PM
Reply to  George Mc

Here’s an interview where he uses the word “underdeveloping” though I like my coinage better, so “undeveloping” it is. In the transcript, it’s toward the end. He discusses his book at that point: “Economics Unmasked”.

How did he know so early in this game! (2010) Lol

https://www.democracynow.org/2010/9/22/chilean_economist_manfred_max_neef_us

Martin Usher
Martin Usher
Jun 25, 2020 6:10 AM
Reply to  Calamity Jane

Drmocracy rings hollow when the media machine describes a political leader as ‘unelectable’ simply because they propose policies that don’t follow global capital prescriptions. It is very difficult being a socially conscious politician in today’s world because you know that what’s needed by ‘the people’ often contradicts what ‘the market’ wants. They know that if they go against international capital then they’re likely to be sanctioned in various ways designed to bring pain to their country and so turn the electorate against them. If the electorate stays with them the pain level gets increased until it becoems open economic war (and, ultimately, real war although most times they’ll just get a color revolution).

Calamity Jane
Calamity Jane
Jun 25, 2020 7:37 PM
Reply to  Martin Usher

Do you the people select the leader candidates and know who wins or does the govt just tell you who gets in?
You are just told and take everything on faith in govt.
The whole thing is a bias unfair media circus.
What can come of that.
 
The consumer market is all about want$ and not needs.
Goods is not “the economy” as that is about banksters that create money in the economic monopoly . And this omits category of services and debt.

George Mc
George Mc
Jun 25, 2020 10:27 AM
Reply to  Calamity Jane

Capitalism tends towards monopoly. The small capitalists get squeezed out by the bigger ones and the bigger ones get squeezed out by the biggest. It would be wonderful to have some impartial organisation that stopped this happening. But the problem is that the bigger one capitalist gets, the more power he has and the more influence and the more easily he can re-jig the system to make him even bigger. Or as Springsteen once sang:
 

Poor man wanna be rich

Rich man wanna be king

And a king ain’t satisfied till he rules everything

 
Only it’s not just a question of “want” but what actually happens.

Calamity Jane
Calamity Jane
Jun 25, 2020 7:43 PM
Reply to  George Mc

Nope they oligarchy just told you you have capitalism least you find out the truth about the economy funded by the moneylenders( banksters).
There was an economic monopoly to start with and all govts borrow from the economic monopoly ( those that gave themselves the authority to create money)and that’s not “capitalism”.As the govt is controlled by those that loan it money needed for its survival.Of course the debt is in the people’s( taxpayers) name.
Its definately, if you want a label for the Crown economic and political system. aptly called Banksterism.

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jun 25, 2020 8:35 PM
Reply to  George Mc

Sounds like an ascending sequence. As a rule, the king believes he can only keep his slippery perch atop the “corporate pole” if he extends his rule.

That is the law of worldly upward mobility, since it is based in worldly dynamics.

That’s why I’ll choose #3: the Oligarch Who made it all, since He only wants to make all of us kings (or queens, their choice). To share.

That’s apparently not an option in the worldly sequence. It only goes up or down. And what cannot stay up, goes down.

£4£&$4$+my2¢

“The only value that a man has or a coin has is that they both bear the image of the King.”*

(*Perhaps a better word really is “Sovereign”)