Avoid the ‘Great Reset’ in Three Easy Steps Sure, it may look rational, with all those numbers, charts and ratios, but the financial system is insane

David James

There are two things that should be understood about the global financial markets as the world faces what is being called the Great Reset, or Bretton Woods 2.

The first is that the US dollar rules the world (as distinct from the US nation).

The second is that the system is insane.

Sure, it may look rational with all those numbers, charts, ratios, algorithms and impressive-sounding technical terms. But collectively the whole thing is mad. As the great British writer GK Chesterton said:

The madman is not the man who has lost his reason. The madman is the man who has lost everything except his reason.

That nicely describes the global capital markets and it does not bode well either for an effective reset or the survival of the monetary system itself.

The US dollar has dominated the global financial markets since 1945, when Franklin D Roosevelt did a deal with King Abdulaziz of Saudi Arabia to denominate oil trade in the American currency, leading to the creation of the ‘petrodollar’ which then became the world’s reserve currency.

The petrodollar has long since faded; more oil is actually denominated in Chinese yuan now than American dollars (although the yuan is fixed to the US dollar so it is not really separate). But the bulk of international trade and asset buying is still denominated in US dollars out of habit and the US dollar has been further entrenched because of the emergence of the global derivatives market. Derivatives are transactions derived from, or rather are gambles on, conventional financial assets such as currencies, interest rates and shares.

The ‘value’ (whatever that means exactly) of these derivatives is $US500-1000 trillion, give or take the odd $US100 trillion.

This intense financial activity, most of which occurs in microseconds, is like having a massive roulette wheel spinning above the earth. According to the Bank for International Settlements, the daily cross border trades with the US dollar on one side equates with almost $US6 trillion.

To give some idea of how big that notional ‘money’ is, the entire US Federal debt, built up over decades, is about $US27 trillion, or the equivalent of less than five days trading. It has entrenched the US dollar as the world’s reserve currency and allows America to do whatever it likes on its Federal budget, its military spending or whatever other financial excesses it can devise, such as a $US21 trillion hole in the defence budget.

Whatever debt the US issues is swallowed up by the massive demand for dollars in the foreign exchange markets. No other country has that freedom.

It has recently become popular to criticise so-called ‘fiat money’, money that is determined by government edict. The contention is that when President Richard Nixon took America off the gold standard in 1971, because the nation could not pay for the Vietnam War, it ushered in an era of government-created money whose value has been progressively degraded.

Though superficially persuasive the argument is entirely misleading. The repeated crises in the financial markets over the last four decades have not been because of too much government intrusion but the opposite: a refusal by governments to govern properly, which allowed private players to run amok.

It was a cleverly engineered scam.

In the 1980s and 1990s there was a world-wide push, prosecuted by well-funded think tanks and lobbyists, to ‘deregulate’ the financial markets. What nobody seemed to notice, or if they did notice they conveniently chose to ignore it, is that this argument is, literally, nonsense. It is impossible to deregulate financial markets because they consist of regulations. Deregulating financial markets is like trying to take the hydrogen, oxygen and wetness out of water. Other types of markets can be deregulated because regulations are external to the economic activity, but in finance they are the same.

Enter insanity.

By convincing Western governments that deregulation was a fine thing (usually using water metaphors to make it seem that regulations somehow got in the way of monetary ‘flows’) private actors were able to make up their own rules, triggering ‘financialisation’, or wealth extraction by the finance sector at the expense of everyone else.

The ridiculous invention of rules has been most obvious in the derivatives markets, which are a complete free-for-all – think of a bet, any bet. It also occurred in the real economy, where unshackled banks and financial institutions invented different ways to create ludicrous levels of global debt that are now, in aggregate, unpayable. The only option for central banks in developed countries has been to drop interest rates to almost zero in the hope of kicking the can down the street and printing money, known as ‘quantitative easing’, on what is laughably called their ‘balance sheets’.

There were plenty of warnings that ‘deregulation’ was dangerous. In 1998, a derivatives company, Long Term Capital Management nearly brought down the Western banking system. Bizarrely, the chairman of the US Federal Reserve, Alan Greenspan, responded by aggressively increasing the number of derivatives traders in the belief that it would all, sort of, balance itself out.

It didn’t.

The 2007-2008 financial crisis revealed the insanity of allowing private players to invent their own rules when there was a near collapse of the entire system. It was only saved because the US Treasury head, Henry Paulson, decided to re-regulate instead of standing back and allowing ‘market forces’ to work.

It was a close run thing, though. On September 18, 2008, $US550 billion went out of the US money markets in a couple of hours. Paulson responded by closing down all America’s money accounts and announcing a guarantee of $250,000 for all bank deposits. That is, he issued a fiat. The Treasury later estimated that had he not done so $US6 trillion would have exited the US financial system by the end of the day. Given that banks lend out roughly 20 times their capital base this would have spelt the end of the monetary system of the world.

Like all good madmen, banks and financial traders, incapable of taking any responsibility for their own actions and faithfully adhering to their smug anti-government rhetoric, outrageously blamed governments for a crisis that they had caused. They got away with it. Almost no financiers went to jail and they continued their debauch of the system, exploiting lower interest rates to increase debt to its current unsustainable levels.

Can a genuine reset be achieved? Not with the current finance technocrats, who have probably never scrutinised an assumption in their lives. Compare these superficial thinkers with John Maynard Keynes, the person who led the British delegation to Bretton Woods 1 in 1944. A member of the Bloomsbury Group Keynes thought deeply both about what money is and how it should function (he is associated with the economics of government spending but that is only a cartoonish version of his thought). Almost none of the current crop of central bankers, heads of global institutions or schemers in the World Economic Forum are capable of such reflection. Most did not even notice that ‘financial deregulation’ is a flat contradiction.

What should be done?

First:

Remove the central assumption behind the madness and recognise that money is a system of rules in which government has to be a central player, an umpire. The demonization of ‘fiat money’ is rubbish. So is the idea of freeing up market forces by deregulating the finance system. The question is not whether governments should be involved, but how they should be involved – what constitutes good governance of the system.

Second:

Find ways – it will require a jettisoning of the circular arguments of neo-classical economics – to reimpose some sort of control over the quantity of money. Because of financial deregulation, authorities ceded any control over the amount of credit in the system. They can only control the cost of money, the interest rate. With interest rates at close to zero that remaining tool has been rendered useless.

Critics of fiat money get starry-eyed about reintroducing the gold standard or buying Bitcoin. This is because both are finite; in theory they introduce some control over the quantity of money and raise the prospect that it might once again function as a means of exchange rather than something to be debauched in an endless regress. But it is a blind alley. Neither Bitcoin nor gold can be realistically used as a means of exchange, and in any case they are both valued in fiat currency: US dollars. They are just another type of financial asset for investors to play with.

Third:

The financial schemers should, even for their own sakes, shelve any ideas about a global central bank digital currency for cross-border transactions, no matter how seductive it might seem as a power grab. It would be a genuine threat to US dollar dominance, imperilling the US military’s ability to spend what it wants. The centralisation of power it implies also poses a threat to Chinese and Russian military autonomy.

Financiers like to think that soldiers are just guns for hire, that money rules everything. A glance at history suggests otherwise. If the financiers go head to head with military interests they will get some nasty surprises and we will be no closer to a solution to the monetary debauch.

David James has been a business and finance journalist, editor, and satirical columnist for over 30 years. He has PhD in English Literature and his web site is bardbitesback.com

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Noneya
Noneya
Aug 31, 2021 6:48 PM

Click on the Bretton Woods 2 link above and note how far up our backsides the “Intelligentsia” have their heads. I have never heard such blatant crap fall out of anyone’s mouth. Does this person actually believe what she is saying? If so, her head is up her own posterior. Their true idea of successful – worldwide lockdowns, tyranny, free speech censorship, screaming economic collapse and inflation, imaginary science and unlawful mandates. Death camps to follow. Wow. Sign me up.

putacorruta
putacorruta
Jul 2, 2021 5:14 PM

Sure. it’s interesting on a financial and monetary poitn of view, BUT, how do we stop the ‘great reset’ fascist agenda using a fake pandemic to make our societies totalitarian nightmares.

As far as we know, we are still in it and they are preparing the next steps of enslavement.

g wiltek
g wiltek
Feb 5, 2021 1:59 AM

This is a wasted read. Truly nonsensical.

messenger charles
messenger charles
Feb 3, 2021 6:07 PM

There is no money, only debt notes – bills or promises-to-pay

Paul
Paul
Feb 3, 2021 12:11 PM

What happened to the WEF allegedly shafting us a with their ‘great reset’ that this website purported back in November.

WEF hardly gets a mention in this article.

So the article ‘own nothing and be happy in November was BS after all, as I commented on there?

If not, my questions still stands. What is 1st stage? When? How long are you willing to wait until you admit it was all BS?

Stay Safe
Paul

Ferd III
Ferd III
Feb 3, 2021 9:27 AM

An article of illiteracy. He praises Keynes? Insane. Keynes et al is why nation states are bankrupt and printing magic money causing real world inflation, which their ‘models’ erase through tortuous calculations. The Financial System is the most regulated system imaginable and is not a ‘neo-con free market’. Far from it.

Murray Rothbard
Murray Rothbard
Feb 2, 2021 8:23 PM

This article is an embarrassment.

Neither Bitcoin nor gold can be realistically used as a means of exchange, and in any case they are both valued in fiat currency: US dollars.

hahaha.

When Bitcoin becomes the “Unit of Account” it will not be valued in dollars.

therevolutionwas
therevolutionwas
Feb 2, 2021 10:21 PM

Yes, this guy doesn’t know much about real economics (Murray’s kind)

Random Brower
Random Brower
Feb 3, 2021 8:46 PM

Agree 100%. The article is pure garbage. Gold is certainly not finite. If the value of gold were to increase then so would the rewards for increasing supply – it’s simple economics. Throwing gold and Bitcoin together like this only demonstrates that any other points made in the article are not worth reading. Very poor.

SteveK9
SteveK9
Feb 2, 2021 5:15 PM

The basic argument here is very similar to Modern Monetary Theory, which people (who don’t understand it at all) deride as money printing or ‘Keynesianism’. An absolutely lucid description of the nature of money can be found in Warren Mosler’s ‘The seven deadly innocent frauds of monetary policy’. Mosler was a banker … those are the people that understand money, Economists are completely hopeless and understand nothing.

https://www.moslereconomics.com/wp-content/powerpoints/7DIF.pdf

therevolutionwas
therevolutionwas
Feb 2, 2021 10:27 PM
Reply to  SteveK9

You don’t give yourself or others much credit. People should be free to exchange whatever they want as money. If a person accepts something with no value it’s his problem. They would soon learn the difference between sea shells, fiat paper and other common items, and, gold and silver backed currency.

Nah, nope
Nah, nope
Feb 2, 2021 1:57 PM

It’s because of fiat money that the debt was able to get so ridiculous…..can’t believe this article gets attention instead of scorn.

Kiwijoker
Kiwijoker
Feb 2, 2021 5:47 PM
Reply to  Nah, nope

I once drove a Fiat… It cost a fair bit of money to keep it going.

Jake
Jake
Feb 2, 2021 1:00 PM

The totality of this article (and comments) proves that it is simply too late to achieve financial harmony that the USA and major developed economies will accept. Inflation will accelerate, economies will crash, human suffering will occur and then corruption and greed will subside….and we start over. Unfortunately, I believe it is not that far away.

Dam
Dam
Feb 2, 2021 9:11 AM

Welp, an interesting combination of knowledge and ignorance… but perhaps I’m being too kind, or trusting?

YeahRight
YeahRight
Feb 2, 2021 3:21 AM

One of the worst articles written on this subject  The author could not be more confused.

“… recognise that money is a system of rules in which government has to be a central player, an umpire.”

Where is the support for this statement.  History tells us the opposite.  Centralization doesn’t work.  Government is a monopoly power. The government is not an umpire, but redistributes wealth and power. Money is not a system of rules. It’s a commodity used to exchange goods and services. This statement is ridiculous and false.

“The demonization of ‘fiat money’ is rubbish. So is the idea of freeing up market forces by deregulating the finance system.”

The author doesn’t understand the system is HIGHLY regulated.  We have hundreds of entities regulating the markets. That’s the problem. The regulations prevent others from competing with the large banks and brokers. It’s job protection. The Fed is a massive form of regulation. It’s the only entity that can legally print money.  

“The question is not whether governments should be involved, but how they should be involved – what constitutes good governance of the system.”

LOL! The author fails to understand that those regulated over time always capture their regulators.  It doesn’t work.  The author is so naive to actually trust there can be a good system of government.  See education, healthcare and banking. ALL HEAVILY REGULATED, ALL CAPTURED BY GOVERNMENT AND ALL FAILING.

“Find ways – it will require a jettisoning of the circular arguments of neo-classical economics – to reimpose some sort of control over the quantity of money. ”

This author doesn’t know anything about economics. Only circular argument is from the author.  “Some sort”???  So he doesn’t know what to propose.  The free market will chose good money over bad money every time.  See bitcoin demand as an example. Note the banks hoard good money (gold, silver) and print and sell bad money. Basic stuff the author doesn’t understand.

“Because of financial deregulation, authorities ceded any control over the amount of credit in the system.”

Exact opposite.  They actually took control of the system by manipulating the price of money.  More importantly, the Fed’s money printing is NOT deregulation, but in fact MASSIVE REGULATION.  The Federal Reserve Act gives the Fed the power to print money.  Holy crap this guy has it all backwards. Credit is just lending. Any free economy lends savings to others. Credit is just a form of capital. The only “control” over capital is by government edict – regulation and taxation.

“They can only control the cost of money, the interest rate. With interest rates at close to zero that remaining tool has been rendered useless.”

What remaining tool?  They don’t need any other more powerful tool than printing money. The author is a tool.

“Neither Bitcoin nor gold can be realistically used as a means of exchange, and in any case they are both valued in fiat currency: US dollars. They are just another type of financial asset for investors to play with.”

LOL. Author goes full retard.  Gold has been a medium of exchange for thousands of years. Ha, he thinks it only goes one way! Does he not understand fiat is also valued in gold, silver and bitcoin? Flip the numerator and denominator, idiot.

This article is full of fallacies and misleading information. Ignore at all costs.

BBP
BBP
Feb 2, 2021 9:00 AM
Reply to  YeahRight

The entire course of history proved (as does simple logic) that Government is by definition an inherently inefficient, wasteful, and coercive territorial monopolist of ultimate decisionmaking & violence that is controlled by Globalist Kleptocrats that use the coercive power of gov to grant themselves subsidies & privileges.
Money is FAR too important to be left to such an institution…The LACK of sound money and lack of free markets is at the root of the major problems we face…

paranoid goy
paranoid goy
Feb 2, 2021 9:48 AM
Reply to  YeahRight

The fallacy you fall for, YeahRight, and the article author a bit as well, is that the FED is Government. Once you admit that the FED is actually a private cartel with private shareholding and profit motives, you will see that all the rest of our woes flow from that. Even you start screaming like a child deprived of his dummy when anyone suggests the government regulates private business, then you pretend the FED is a regulatory organ. It is a parasite.
You even denigrate education and health care as proof of regulatory failure, but conveniently (ignorantly?) forget that both those civic functions were taken from government, handed over to ‘private enterprise’ and the only part government is allowed to play, is handing over tax money, as and when PRIVATE cartels (FED, CFR, AIPAC, LGBTGWhatever) demand, and only for those programmes the aforementioned mafias sanctify. YOU effed up the education system, the better to hide your devilish economics theories behind the curtain of cultivated ignorance of the masses. Now you lot promote sandwich-people gender confusion to legitimise turning little boys into eunuchs, too cowed to revolt when they grow up and accidentally get educated.
The reason gold is good money, is because it is impossible to counterfeit successfully. Bitcoin has many promises, but is it truly as fake proof as the adherents say? I for one am skeptical.
In the end, the only real money IS fiat money. Why? Because my government says so, and they back it up with regulation, taxation and guns. If my government tells me tomorrow to use cowry shells, my only concern is whether they can secure the provenance of shells going around. When the FED starts handing out ANY form of money, it is, by definition and the forces of profiteering, debased and corruptable to their own profitable ends. Or do you suppose businessmen do things from the goodness of their heart and world peace?
So, YeahRight, and all the babies screaming about their ZIRP dummies here, you must hope the common man never finds out how your scam/s work, because otherwise, “…there shall be revolution in the streets by morning…” Was it Pres. Jackson said that?

goldhoarder
goldhoarder
Feb 2, 2021 12:52 PM
Reply to  paranoid goy

The mistake you are making is not realizing they are all one and the same. The banksters, powerful politicians, heads of our gigantic federal bureaucracies, intelligence agencies, military leaders. This is their baby. They understand the fed just fine. It is their most powerful tool. Control the food, control the people. Control the resources, control the continent. Control the money, control the world. The USD is an instrumemt of power, control, and domination. The people at the top of the power pyramid know this very well.

paranoid goy
paranoid goy
Feb 2, 2021 7:05 PM
Reply to  goldhoarder

I don’t see where I made the mistake you accuse me of. You do realise the FBI is a branch of the ATF which is the tax collection agency of the FED? The one that not even Trump could escape, never mind control. He did not understand that when he went into politics, poor fellow. I would never seperate the alphabet agencies, it’s all one soup.
In the end, Bolsh owns them all via the FED/ City of London. You do know about the City, where even the queen has to get off her carriage and ask permission to enter, yeeees?
The USD is a tool, the real instrument of power is the educational system, without which, people would take note of the food they eat etc.

Derryl Hermanutz
Derryl Hermanutz
Feb 3, 2021 11:03 PM
Reply to  paranoid goy

It is well enough that the American people do not understand our money and banking system for if they did I believe there would be a revolution by tomorrow morning. Henry Ford

goldhoarder
goldhoarder
Feb 2, 2021 12:42 PM
Reply to  YeahRight

Fiat money is primarily a tool of power. A means to control assets, control resources, and even control behavior through tax codes, grants, and preferred lending. Those in control of the money spigot and first in line of the output are our masters.

Kiwijoker
Kiwijoker
Feb 2, 2021 3:57 PM
Reply to  YeahRight

Money is a technology… Money is not a commodity.

and

The ‘free market’ is neither free nor a market.

also

Avoid cat milk soup.

.

paranoid goy
paranoid goy
Feb 3, 2021 6:38 AM
Reply to  Kiwijoker

Money is technology. I think of it as a tool. I am no financial guru, and economics theories are just religious tracts, in my thinking, but one has to start yout thinking somewhere.
This is where I started:
https://greenpets.co.za/index.php/en/32-paranoid-goy/economics/105-economic-fable
Currently trying to get a reliable, unspammable unhijackable comments section going for the express purpose of clarifying monetary principles. It’s not going well….

Derryl Hermanutz
Derryl Hermanutz
Feb 4, 2021 12:02 AM
Reply to  paranoid goy

Money is a technology, a way of doing things. We use money so we can have a buy-sell for money economy in which stuff is bought-sold for money, rather than a barter-exchange economy in which stuff is traded for other stuff. Money is the payments medium that enables buy-sell transactions. Buyers of stuff (goods, services, assets) pay money to sellers of the stuff in buy-sell, payer-payee transactions. Ownership of stuff is transferred from sellers to buyers. Ownership of the money is transferred from buyers to sellers. “The economy” produces all the stuff. Banks issue all the money. That is, the central-commercial banking system has a monopoly over issuing the payments media tat the economy needs in order to function. I described the money system as simply and thoroughly as I could in a number of books including The Road to Debt Bondage: How Banks Create Unpayable Debt; and, A Brief History of Financial Plunder. All my books are available as free downloads at Smashwords; and as paperbacks and ebooks at Amazon and other online booksellers. I come from a monetary system reform perspective, beginning from CH Douglas (the social credit money and prices system) and Irving Fisher (1005 government issued money and 100% reserve banking) in the 1920s and 30s. Most people – including academic economists, Wall St financiers and government finance ministers – know nothing about where money comes from (commercial banks create the money to fund their bank loans and bond purchases; debtors spend the new money into circulation and owe it all back as payment of their bank loans and bond debts). I’m currently reading James Taylor’s 1862 book, The Mystery of Money, in which he chronicles the monetary ignorance, arguments, confusion and misconceptions that had been plaguing Britain even before the privately owned Bank of England was established in 1694. Via their monopoly over money creation and allocation, bankers enrich themselves and rule the money-using world, and are quite content to finance the confusion by funding academic economics and think tanks who preach the conventional wisdom that we live in a barter economy in which stuff is traded for other stuff and money is merely an abstract numerical representation of the “value” of the real stuff we are all producing and exchanging in the global village marketplace. If I made up sh*t like that I would be ignored. But they are the “experts” backed by their “authoritative consensus” certainties. So government policy is based on advice from “the experts” who preach horsesh*t economic theories that have nothing to do with how the real world’s buy-sell for money economy actually works. On the upside, since the 2007-08 monetary system failure and near collapse, a lot more people have been looking into the money problem and discovering the century long history of monetary system analysts-cum-reformers who clearly describe why the banks’ debt-based system can’t work and advocate the technically simple solution: government issuance of debt-free money, like Ben Franklin and Abraham Lincoln issued. Actually the banks’ debt-based system works very well, serving its purpose of systematically concentrating ownership of money and assets into ever-fewer, ever-richer hands and reducing everybody else to wage serfdom and debt bondage. I described how that process works in the Financial Plunder book.

paranoid goy
paranoid goy
Feb 4, 2021 6:47 AM

“…the economy produces all the stuff…”
Thank you for your time, I don’t mind sitting in the choir. Does the congregation understand your simple wisdom there, though? I am so utterly sick of hearing about “growing economy” and “crashing economy”, when “economy” is a system of …er… “how” things work, not “how much there is”. Economy is not how much money you have, it is how effectively you apply it, yes? Might as well tell me you want to “grow hard work” or “grow honesty”, linguistic non-sequiturs, baby-talk for idjits. But Them installing myths and idiocies IS the economy of “economics theory” is it not?
Now, those books of your: Is you making moneys, do I just download, what are the ISBNs, you know, advertise, don’t allude, dude!
I don’t write no books, I specifically aim little snippets at people who don’t read books, while inciting arguments from those who think they know better. I read very few books on economics theory. As an acoitheist, I have little interest in the religion of Bolsh, and almost every economics theory is paid for and promoted by Bolsh to confuse the Goyim and get them to argue about nonsense, all the while, and I quote a clever-sounding guy here: “…systematically concentrating ownership of money and assets into ever-fewer, ever-richer hands and reducing everybody else…”. People take exception when I point out that globalist capitalism is actually pure Bolshevik dogma in the service of communism.
I have paged through many popular books by ‘economics experts’, at the first mention of ‘economic growth’ or ‘money market’ I put their evangelic tracts back on the shelf. You don’t ask a Christian to read Crowley “to learn how the world works”, do you? Well, not more than once, anyway.

Andrew
Andrew
Feb 2, 2021 4:19 PM
Reply to  YeahRight

Thank you for your critique. I am ignorant in the workings of financial markets and government manipulations and I read this article with an interest to learn! Your detailed analysis of the article has given me at least SOME understanding by pointing out its flaws, and with humour! Any recommended reading?

Michael Greenberg
Michael Greenberg
Feb 1, 2021 10:51 PM

Excellent article. Count me in as a paid subscriber.

Observer
Observer
Feb 1, 2021 6:24 PM

I think it’s more constructive to critique the contents of the article than attack the author with ad hominems.

First off, can we congratulate the Off-Guardian for hosting a piece discussing the monetary system at all? I (and most others) who have studied the subject consider it to be the greatest source of evil in our societies, if you consider endless warmongering and credit-induced inequality to be the greatest evils of our society.

However he makes numerous mistakes, but a couple that really stood out:

Critics of fiat money get starry-eyed about reintroducing the gold

standard or buying Bitcoin. This is because both are finite; in theory

they introduce some control over the quantity of money and raise the

prospect that it might once again function as a means of exchange rather than something to be debauched in an endless regress. But it is a blind alley. Neither Bitcoin nor gold can be realistically used as a means of exchange…

he doesn’t explain why he considers gold to be an unrealistic means of exchange, so we’re left guessing; but I’ve heard similar assertions by surprisingly large numbers of non-monetary “economists”, and the predicate underpinning their belief is that under a gold standard we’d all be running around purchasing stuff in person using gold coins.

Not so; there’s no reason why we couldn’t retain modern electronic methods of payment (debit/credit cards, paypal, etc). The banks that are holding the underlying gold (“specie”) keep ledgers and net out transactions in real time or at end of day/week; or custodians of specie for many banks merely update the ownership of their respective weights of gold.
… and the same with BTC (bitcoin). The blockchain ledger is too slow for real-time transactions, but exchanges (ie, “banks”) could hold BTC as the underlying specie and nett out transaction in real time, just as they do with fiat at present, and update the blockchain nightly.

… and he’s wrong about them both being finite. Because gold is being mined, the stock of it increase by around 2% per annum.

… and in any case they are both valued in fiat currency: US dollars. They are just another type of financial asset for investors to play with.

this illustrates he really does not understand the subject. Under the gold standard, gold wasn’t “priced” in dollars; dollars were weights of gold (and/or silver – but that’s another discussion). Gold wasn’t valued in dollars; gold was dollars.

The biggest problem with the gold (or hypothetical BTC) standard is the same as the problem with fiat currency: it’s in the interest of both financiers and politicians to debauch the currency. The gold standard stopped them doing it only so long as governments insisted banks stuck to it; when 1914 came along, the Brits (thanks Keynes!) dropped out of the system so the government could inflate the money supply to pay for the war.

The author uses the expression “starry-eyed” to imply goldbugs are naive, but falls into the same trap himself; he is “starry-eyed” about the idea of incorruptible government regulators keeping a check on the very people governments rely on to create credit booms to give the electorate the “feel-good” factor that keeps them voting for the incumbents.

We’re only likely to see reform of the monetary system after inflation picks up and accelerates into hyperinflation and the entire system crashes, and the average voter starts taking an interest in the subject. Until then, financiers and politicians (and the regulators they appoint) will continue to collude at our expense.

goldhoarder
goldhoarder
Feb 2, 2021 1:11 PM
Reply to  Observer

Yes. I don’t think it is collusion. This system was put in place by clear minded psycopaths and is maintained by such. It is the US governments most powerful weapon. Their primary means of control. The stress we all feel is the strain of the empire reaching its breaking point. No nation has ever succeeded in conquering the world. There is too much corruption and abuse trying to hold it all together. Go back and read the news articles from when Russia first entered Syria. The DC establishment reaction was really something. I would describe it more as shock and surprise than outrage. A bursting of their bubble world. The WEF’s “great reset” is something of an admission that they have hit a peak and are in decline. It is their plan to try something else. Reading between the lines it would appear tbe intention is to consolidate wealth and resources in as few a hands as possible and deal out a subsistence living to the majority. Once they consolidate as much power as possible they’ll make another go of it. I don’t think they’ll get that far. The anger from the new impoverished will be too much to control. Unless they have an even deadlier virus to release to terrify everybody into line

From Far Away
From Far Away
Feb 1, 2021 2:37 PM

The wealth of misunderstanding displayed in the article left me stunned.

Incidentally, I first read the article on Zerohedge, and after just a paragraph or two into the article I started shaking my head. I thought this author needs to be corrected, but then the misunderstandings started coming so thick and fast I thought: “Where do I even start?”

Then I paged down to the Zerohedge comment section, and the first comment (at that time) quoted one of the inane claims made by the author in the article, and then says in almost disbelief:

“My God, nothing or no one will be able to help this guy…”

The first response to that comment was: “Yes well pointed out that was astonishingly bad.”

Another commenter suggested: “Reads like a freshman year econ paper.”

And I guess that sums it up.

But, let me do just two of the many utterly fallacious arguments from the article. The author asserts:

“Neither Bitcoin nor gold can be realistically used as a means of exchange…”

Utter nonsense. Bitcoin is realistically being used as a means of exchange right now. The major thing holding it back from even more use is the established interests entrenched by corrupted government support. As to gold, with silver it has centuries of use as a means of exchange, where its limitations (such as weight and secure holding) was efficiently overcome by trading claims to it.

The author also asserts:

“The US dollar has dominated the global financial markets since 1945, when Franklin D Roosevelt did a deal with King Abdulaziz of Saudi Arabia to denominate oil trade in the American currency, leading to the creation of the ‘petrodollar’ which then became the world’s reserve currency.”

That blatantly implies that the “deal” was THE thing that established the dominance of the US dollar.

Which is utter balderdash.

The US is the significant major power that did not have to fight war on its prime, productive soil (especially with it being under prolonged attack or foreign control). The US is the significant power that could use that situation to ramp up production during wartime. The US is the significant power that lent huge amounts of money (directly) or via military assistance programs (thus indirect money) to numerous other countries, who mostly finished the war in significant debt to the US (including the “victorious” nations). The US is the significant power that had Fort Knox filled with gold (huge amounts belonging to itself) after WWII.

Those are just some major aspects underpinning the establishment of the dollar right off the top of my head. The “deal” was relatively insignificant in the establishment of dollar pre-eminence after WWII.

YeahRight
YeahRight
Feb 2, 2021 3:23 AM
Reply to  From Far Away

I agree. The article is so bad it’s scary. The author has no business commenting on these subjects. Worst I’ve read in a long time. Utter nonsense.

Philpot
Philpot
Feb 1, 2021 1:49 PM

Rather a pointless rant, full of vague assertions, criticisms and lacking any definitive suggestions.
The endless money printing of the USA and EU (following Japan’s experiment) will eventually lead to a collapse of those currencies against hard assets – hence the monetary inflation will lead to an increase in prices (price inflation) and those without any hard assets (property, gold/silver and possibly Bitcoin) will be impoverished. It Is the poor and unprepared middle classes – as usual in history – who will suffer most.
Sadly free-market capitalism will get the blame, but it is the ‘politicians’ (read:corrupt idiots) and their so-called ‘economists’ (read: deluded idiots) who are to blame by debasing the currency and encouraging unsustainable levels of debt and spending.

Ivor Deacon
Ivor Deacon
Feb 1, 2021 1:27 PM

You say “banks and financial traders, incapable of taking any responsibility for their own actions and faithfully adhering to their smug anti-government rhetoric, outrageously blamed governments for a crisis that they had caused. They got away with it. Almost no financiers went to jail and they continued their debauch of the system”

How did they get away with it? Who failed to hold them to account? Who decided not to prosecute them?

Their cronies in government, of course.

And who is now holding interest rates so low, in order to stave off bankruptcy? The State.
So who is to blame for the capital misallocation in our economies? The State.
And who is STILL giving money to these bankers? The State.

But yes – it’s outrageous to blame government.

You are suggesting that free market capitalism has been replaced by crony capitalism (can you even understand the difference?) but seem unable to see half the cronies?

Bankers (like all businessmen) become corrupt when there is government to bribe.

Unable to compete fairly, they appeal to the State for patronage and once given, become tools of the State. And extraordinarily, apologists (like you) that cannot identify the root cause of the problem, insist that the cure is more of the poison!

Homeopathic economics.

TRY to understand. Crony capitalism only exists because of GOVERNMENT.

Shorn of the advantages that can be obtained through State patronage, businessmen stand or fall on their own merits.

We call it free market capitalism.

Perhaps you could familiarise yourself with it before insisting it has failed?

mikael
mikael
Feb 1, 2021 1:18 PM

I am sorry for the lenght, OffG I have even cutt is to the bone and gives just some few eh…. rants, but the issue is important, maybe the most important we as humanity have faced since the dawn of time, its about freedom or slavery, and I talk global scale.

This have been debated from time to time, and of course as in everything else, there is alternatives, but the moment you say that, you will have to realign your self into an reality where truth is hidden, falsifyed or simply lied about, banking can be dealth with, like creations of Public/state own banks not private as they are by large to day, run by BIS witch is also private like the FeD, and thats where our state gets their funding from, etc, etc.
I recomend to read the book called The Web of Debt by Ellen Brown, and so on, where states as North Dakota is one ex. witch have in the imperial banana republic an state owned bank, an rearity even in the entire world, why its not been known, you can ask your self, because the counter force to it is so much more able to force us all into beliving absurditys about finacial reality when its infact an scam, period.

Take the latest hedge war, and now Silver is attacked, witch should show anyone that the entire metal marked is just an swidle as good as the CONvid scam is, overleveraged to kingdom comes and now I hope they crash it so people can watch what comes next, and dont for an second think that this will go unseen by the scums in charge, they have their minions all over the board to divert, willify or lie about everything, but the truth is, its an scam.
And I have an proposal, regarding the scam of scams, fractional banking, they can create upto 9 times the walue of something I buy, lets say an house, I just take an number like 1 mill. that can then be timed upto 9 times akak 9 mill, and you may ask how on earth is that possible, yeah, nice question isnt it, ask them, not me, but my proposal is more direct, if they can time that upto 9 times, then we/I whom bought an house, should have 10% of that sum, 1 mill given back every year, as long I have the house and as long as I pays my mortage on this 1 mill.
Every year, remeber, the day you can pay, you loose the house, not the mortage, and they bank can reposses your house and sell it again, and once again they can take upto 9 times the value thru been in the system called fractional banking, so, all in all, they can cash in so much more than what we ever can, but the pay back should be made theu giving us 10%, of the 9 mill, if not, then we should abolish this fractional systemic fraud, permanently because if just that, an economic parasitm witch is unpresedented in human history, usury is one thing witch is bad enough, fractional banking is one of the worst scam ever invented.

And, why on earth, this is something I stil cant wrap my head around do we need more currensys, like Etherum to Bitcoin, why, its just another invented scam, we have currencsys, our national one works fine, they can be convurted to whatever other currency there is, we dont need more, this is for me, like the GR is whining about, just another one, easy to manipulate and create, and adds nothing to the exsisting systems.
Hurmf.

Then we come to state finacess.
This is where I know I am stepping into an mine field, because again of the systemic propaganda witch have soaked the minds of people for so long that to even debate any kind of alternatives is become like banging ones head into an brick wall.
All wars are bankers wars, been like that since ancient times, watch an video, if you find it, I dont expect it, but its out there about the similarity between the present Imperial banana republic and acient Rome, by Judge Napolitano, an tour de force is how its done and the effect of it, this should be known to an much greater extent that what it is, this is what happening as we speak.
Then I will link to an writing from an person whom is demonised to such an extent that I dont want to write the name, because I know it will be cencured, again, all wars are bankers wars, from the American revolution to the present, just take an look at what the French Gov, and Banks are doing in Africa, and why Africa is by large screwed, I can take that another time, but do take an look and read about that, just as one example among many.

The quote:

Our financial principle: Finance shall exist for the benefit of the state; the financial magnates shall not form a state within the state. Hence our aim to break the thralldom of interest.

Relief of the state, and hence of the nation, from its indebtedness to the great financial houses, which lend on interest.

Nationalization of the Reichsbank and the issuing houses, which lend on interest.

Provision of money for all great public objects (waterpower, railroads etc), not by means of loans, but by granting non-interest bearing state bonds or without using ready money.

Introduction of a fixed standard of currency on a secured basis.

Creation of a national bank of business development (currency reform) for granting non-interest bearing loans.

Fundamental remodeling of the system of taxation on social-economic principles. Relief of the consumer from the burden of indirect taxation, and of the producer from crippling taxation (fiscal reform and relief from taxation).

Wanton printing of bank notes, without creating new values, means inflation. We all lived through it. But the correct conclusion is that an issue of non-interest bearing bonds by the state cannot produce inflation if new values are at the same time created.

The fact that today great economic enterprises cannot be set on foot without recourse to loans is sheer lunacy. Here is where reasonable use of the state’s right to produce money which might produce most beneficial results.

Yeah, this is about state/public banking, this is what they fear, this is the solution, and they know it, you just dont belive it, because ignorance is what, an bliss.
huh
Have an nice day and take care, the world is about to change, and nothing of any real worth comes easy, we have to fight for every bloody inch of it, never ever think anything else, and they will fight back.

peace

From Far Away
From Far Away
Feb 1, 2021 1:28 PM
Reply to  mikael

[And I have an proposal, regarding the scam of scams, fractional banking, they can create upto 9 times the walue of something I buy, lets say an house, I just take an number like 1 mill. that can then be timed upto 9 times…]

That is a dated perspective. The whole concept of 10% reserves which allows a 9x credit creation has largely fallen by the wayside.

[And, why on earth, this is something I stil cant wrap my head around do we need more currensys, like Etherum to Bitcoin, why, its just another invented scam, we have currencsys, our national one works fine…]

Erm no, “our national one” does not “work fine.”

There is nothing wrong with competing currencies. In fact, there is lots right with them, including prominently that they may form a check on destructive devaluation of other (especially national) currencies.

PS. I will leave my responses there. Some other strange ideas you have I do not have the energy for now.

Sarah
Sarah
Feb 1, 2021 6:12 AM

As I understand it governments ‘borrow’ money created out of nothing from the central bank infrastructure overseen by the International Bank for Settlements in Basel – non governmental with private interests – and the interest, not the principal, thereon is paid by the taxpayer. A fairer way would be for governments to create their own money as needed funded by a 1% tax on every transaction.The farmer would pay 1% of the cost of his potato crop, the transporter would pay 1% on the transport cost, the market seller 1% on that accumulated cost and the end user 1%. Amazon, for instance, would therefore pay 1% on every item sold and the buyer also. This way you would cut out tax evasion/avoidance as no one person/enterprise would feel crippled by such a tax and everyone would be a willing contributor. Many a mickle makes a muckle as the saying goes.

Wil
Wil
Feb 1, 2021 12:10 AM

Great piece of BBC propaganda

niko
niko
Jan 31, 2021 11:56 PM

The Year Ahead: Geopolitics
CLICK HERE

niko
niko
Jan 31, 2021 11:42 PM

The Year Ahead: Geopolitics (James Corbett)
CLICK HERE

zdb
zdb
Jan 31, 2021 10:24 PM

Western governments are already resorting to private security contractors to enforce decreed laws that government police and military will not enforce. AKA mercenaries.

Question: are you sure this new generation of overt tyrants (gavin newsome, andrew cuomo, kamala harris, trudeau, biden, deblasio, macron, merkel, fauci, hancock, bojo, lauri lightfoot) who rule by arbitrary decree can or will be reined in by government militaries?

Tor Guttorm
Tor Guttorm
Jan 31, 2021 9:32 PM

The best way to destroy the capitalist system was to debauch the currency
― Vladimir Ilich Lenin (1870-1924)

From Far Away
From Far Away
Feb 1, 2021 1:31 PM
Reply to  Tor Guttorm

[The best way to destroy the capitalist system was to debauch the currency
― Vladimir Ilich Lenin (1870-1924)]

Only thing is, he didn’t actually say that.

paranoid goy
paranoid goy
Feb 3, 2021 6:42 AM
Reply to  From Far Away

Now make us a list of all the nonsense Hitler never said…
Or do you only defend Bolsheviks?

AngryAngry
AngryAngry
Jan 31, 2021 8:54 PM

You might be right: A combined military power destroys the World economic system of the great prostitute – maybe soon🤷‍♂️
15 And the angel said to me, “The waters that you saw, where the prostitute is seated, are peoples and multitudes and nations and languages.
16 And the ten horns that you saw, they and the beast will hate the prostitute. They will make her desolate and naked, and devour her flesh and burn her up with fire,
17 for God has put it into their hearts to carry out his purpose by being of one mind and handing over their royal power to the beast, until the words of God are fulfilled.
18 And the woman that you saw is the great city that has dominion over the kings of the earth.” – Revelation 17:15-18

From Far Away
From Far Away
Feb 1, 2021 1:41 PM
Reply to  AngryAngry

[Revelation 17:15-18]

Yeah, yeah, whatever. I suspect you have not yet investigated the provenance of that piece of writing so reverently called “Revelation.” Maybe you should.

gkn
gkn
Feb 2, 2021 2:22 PM
Reply to  AngryAngry

No need for “visions” caused by the Destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem in 70 AD, hardly a prediction in the first place since it had already happened when this was written. We’d be far better off trying to learn facts – quite hard enough.

Reachable Spike
Reachable Spike
Jan 31, 2021 7:39 PM

Fine essay with a lot of insightful consideration behind it. Trade, even stripped down to its most simple essence, is an arbitrary set of rules that exert a tyranny over human responsibility, and government regulation — indeed, a massive amount of it — is absolutely necessary until such time as the practice of trade is transcended.

Powerful observation too about the world’s major militaries thwarting a global digital currency.

From Far Away
From Far Away
Feb 1, 2021 1:49 PM

[Trade, even stripped down to its most simple essence, is an arbitrary set of rules that exert a tyranny over human responsibility…]

Sorry, but many years in primary school we voluntarily traded marbles among each other.

Are you suggesting that we thereby “exerted a tyranny over human responsibility?”

Well, at least it seems as if you are suggesting that. And if so, that must surely be one of the most misinformed suggestions I have read today.

I loved my trade in marbles. So did all my friends at school. It was simply the most natural thing for us as young humans to do. We certainly did not want to have any teachers involved!

Of course that was an alternate scenario. Having an authority (a teacher?) step in and confiscate some kids marbles and forcibly hand them over to other kids.

Now THAT last option would be tyranny and theft.

Dharmadasa
Dharmadasa
Feb 6, 2021 4:20 AM
Reply to  From Far Away

That’s amazing, I had the same experience with marbles at primary school. Marble trading spontaneously emerged as a free market, and it unleashed a huge amount of entrepreneurial talent. Kids turned into carnival barkers in the playground, and form long queues to trade and play. Skills rose rapidly, as ever more complex games evolved. It was exciting, fun, great. The moment the teachers started regulating the activity, all the dynamism evaporated and we stopped dealing and playing. The playground became boring. What a great metaphor for free unregulated trade among autonomous agents. Why should anyone enforce a monopoly on medium of exchange?

Fred B
Fred B
Jan 31, 2021 7:16 PM

This is one explanation of banking “deregulation”, which started in earnest with the setting aside of the Glass Steagall Act in around 1999, and other deregulation since. The central banks and our governments in the US and in the EU were behind such deregulations and it was entirely foreseeable what would happen. It allowed a precarious economy built without any real substance but derivatives. The globalist planning which began well before they announced their 21st century blueprint with UN Agenda 21 in 1992, actually required the crashing of the Western economy in order to usher in their so-called “sustainability” controls to give the international banking cartel and all of their central banks in our nations the reset to centralized control on global finances and control over essential global resources and trade. The cartel controls by usury and debt rigging and now likely by derivatives. Meanwhile, in order to protect our rights and our sweat equity, we are to trust and rely on the most corrupt nation in the history of the earth flooding the world with its fiat as the favored few buy up everything in sight, or we can choose to rely on the more direct efforts to snuff us out with the Great (financial) backed by the thieving banking cartel backing the globalist movement? That is the choice we are given, where both “sides” are completely controlled by the Money Power which is the international banking cartel. The choice is like the one between Trump and Biden – all BS. Tell us by the end of 2021 will cash be king or will it be trash?

Martin Usher
Martin Usher
Jan 31, 2021 7:01 PM

I’ve always thought that the problem is ultimately that people tend to confuse money with value. In an ideal world the two should be equivalent, maintained in balance, but money being a virtual resource is far easier to create and lacks the limitations of physical resources there’s an ever present temptation to increase the amount of money. Capitalism encourages this partly because its ruling ethos isn’t investment as such but ‘return on investment’ — paper profits have to be made regardless of how they’re made — and because its inherent instability means it has to keep growing (again, on paper) lest the entire system collapse.

Unleashing the boring busness of banking to become the monster called the financial services industry has made everyone richer, but only on paper. Its allowed massive profits to be made without the inconvenience of having to actually create those profits in a sort of massive Ponzi scheme where those who get out early enough prosper but most everyone else either has to keep the scheme going or lose everything. Now this financial tail is wagging the dog to the extent that its needs govern every aspect of our lives — the individual’s life, liberty and persuit of happiness is reduced to their credit score which in turn is entirely predicated on their ability to ‘make the payments’. A huge parasitic mess that has squeezed individuals and nations alike until there’s no value left to squeeze. The only way out is a form of ‘great reset’ but unfortunately like everything that’s happened over the last 50 years or more this reset cannot touch the financial world, there’s no ability to say ‘no’ to them without risking serious repercussions. (They also hold governments captive so their will will be expressed with sanctions or explosives if anyone cuts up rough.) The effect is likely to be dystopian with more and more people working harder and harder for less and less unless there is some way to push back, to push the financialization genie back into the bottle. One start wouild be to stop worshipping the financializers and their stooges as saviours — too many people I know regard someone like Trump as representing the interests of ‘the little guy’ when he’s quite obviously nothing of the sort, he’s one of ‘them’. Its possible that some of ‘them’ have figured out that playing the game to the end will cause everyone, including them, to lose but pressure could be applied by the simple application of a modern version of Marx’s slogan — “Workers of the world unite! You have nothing to lose but your chains!”.

mgeo
mgeo
Feb 1, 2021 5:31 AM
Reply to  Martin Usher

Russia and China are quite safe. Other countries need to implement MMT and reduce globalism.
https://www.unz.com/mhudson/the-use-and-abuse-of-mmt/

From Far Away
From Far Away
Feb 1, 2021 1:56 PM
Reply to  Martin Usher

[ Capitalism encourages this partly because its ruling ethos isn’t investment as such but ‘return on investment’ — paper profits have to be made regardless of how they’re made…]

Erm no. I suggest you study corporate finance or investment. It is not “paper profits,” but economic profit, taking into consideration interest rates, inflation, and so on.

That is the exact OPPOSITE of what you are claiming.

I certainly hope that you have not built the rest of your comment (I am not going to read it after you “open” with such a basic mistake) on such a fundamental misunderstanding!

gordun
gordun
Jan 31, 2021 5:46 PM

off becomes on
or maybe it was always so

off is b moonie
off craig the nasonic friend of fishy salmon
off
brave not

limited hangings out

Sarah Jones
Sarah Jones
Jan 31, 2021 5:46 PM

Listen to Podcast #83 = Jason Christoff – X-Ray Tech Dies After COVID Vaccine by The Psychology of Freedom on #SoundCloud. “Pension funds are all gone”. https://soundcloud.com/user-50904611/podcast-83-jason-christoff-x-ray-tech-dies-after-covid-vaccine

comment image

Researcher
Researcher
Jan 31, 2021 8:37 PM
Reply to  Sarah Jones

Pension funds are gone. Social security money was stolen. Gold bullion in central banks and retail banks has disappeared. It’s all coming to a head. People have no idea what is coming next. They are still stuck in their delusions about the system being valid or legitimate.

Marcello
Marcello
Jan 31, 2021 5:21 PM

off subject..what happened to the London Protests scheduled for either the 30th or 31rst of Jan, news black out?

Edwige
Edwige
Jan 31, 2021 5:21 PM

The Fraudian has a lengthy article about how they want to free us from “password tyranny”. Some bloke lost a load of money on Bitcoin because of it apparently. The Fraudian doesn’t care about other forms of tyranny nor especially pro-Bitcoin but who cares? Passwords will be gone in 2-5 years they state with little uncertainty.

The solution? Biometrics. Of course it is. Scan that retina or give that thumbprint to get on-line. Yet another of yesterday’s crazy conspiracies moves a step closer to becoming todays “of course”.

The article quotes evidence from the WEF. Since Biden “won” they decreasingly can be bothered to hide it anymore.

wardropper
wardropper
Jan 31, 2021 4:44 PM

The suggested solution is nowhere near radical enough.
“Remove the central assumption behind the madness and recognise that money is a system of rules in which government has to be a central player, an umpire.” ???

The whole problem is that this “government umpire” long ago reached the bottom, yet is still digging downwards where corruption is concerned.
The smell is appalling, and we need chlorine gas to kill the infection.

An umpire ???

Caligula’s bony remains would make a better umpire.

Minton Lee
Minton Lee
Jan 31, 2021 4:48 PM
Reply to  wardropper

Democratic government is the only umpire that gives the people power.
Who else? …..Oligarchs?….. bankers? ……a far right dictator? I suggest you spend your energies making sure your democracy works well, rather than trashing it….because that is all you’ve got.

wardropper
wardropper
Jan 31, 2021 5:14 PM
Reply to  Minton Lee

You’re missing the point of what I said.
Of course democratic government is the only umpire that gives the people power, but what can we do when what we’ve actually got is not democratic government at all?

It looks like it, it walks like it, it even quacks like it, but it is no longer democracy.
It is merely still using democracy’s clothes.
Under the surface, it is something else entirely.
I thought everybody knew that, but I suppose after a few more months there will no longer be any doubt.

I’m not trashing democracy by any means, and I live my life to the best of my democratic ability.
What I’m actually doing is pointing to where democracy is lacking.
It has gone AWOL, and when you say, “because that is all you’ve got”, I would reply, “We don’t even have that.”

Congress, Senate, Supreme Court, House of Commons, House of Lords, Reichstag, etc. etc. – they’ve all been bought, and I don’t have the money to buy them back.
They are corrupt to the core, and saying so doesn’t make me in any way anti-democratic.
In fact I yearn for viable democracy.

Minton Lee
Minton Lee
Jan 31, 2021 5:33 PM
Reply to  wardropper

I get it, but there is a very thin line between destroying our democracy and fighting for it. Those who would see us under a dictatorship, attack all of our democratic institutions, relentlessly and spread despondency. Ands there are many of those around, including the NSA/CIA who hate democracy, especially in their vassal states.

I find there are very few here who actually make it their task to save our democracy, knowing that is all we have. Writing to our MPs is the action with the most impact, available to us today, but how many here are recommending it? None.

zdb
zdb
Jan 31, 2021 10:34 PM
Reply to  Minton Lee

writing to our MP’s? that’s your answer? after admitting that our govt’s are bought? the system is rigged? and you want us to write our MP’s?

SteveK9
SteveK9
Feb 2, 2021 5:54 PM
Reply to  zdb

Well, it is part of the answer. The other part is to get politicians elected who are ethical and have the welfare of their citizens as their primary goal. Saying it is hopeless … is hopeless.

From Far Away
From Far Away
Feb 1, 2021 2:08 PM
Reply to  Minton Lee

[…destroying our democracy…]

Notice the use of the plural possessive: “our.”

You are in a “democracy is almost god” cult, aren’t you.

zkzm
zkzm
Feb 4, 2021 9:27 AM
Reply to  Minton Lee

I wrote to my MP regularly and only ever received the most asinine of responses. In effect it’s a pointless exercise.
Vote him out next time you say? Well yes of course, except that the candidates are chosen by Party central office, i.e. “He who chooses the candidates… etc etc”.
Vote for the main opposition? And see socialism and woke-ism proliferate, no thank you.
Vote for an independent candidate? In a two-party state with a first-pass-the-post voting system? Not a hope in hell of winning.
The UK is broken, our establishment is rotten to the core.
Playing by their rules will not change the game they play.
Breaking the rules is the only answer.
Get outside of their financial system. Move to another country.
Don’t play their game – deny them your taxes – throttle them where they’ll feel it most, in the only place that counts for them – their pocket.

Arby
Arby
Jan 31, 2021 10:47 PM
Reply to  wardropper

I’d rather have a viable democracy than what we have and what the predator/parasite class is foisting on us – while we are still in this system of things (which is almost toast).

From Far Away
From Far Away
Feb 1, 2021 2:10 PM
Reply to  Arby

[I’d rather have a viable democracy than what we have and what the predator/parasite class is foisting on us…]

Only thing is, it is democracy that helped to entrench the “predator/parasite class.”

Look deeper into how society operates, my friend.

mgeo
mgeo
Feb 1, 2021 5:37 AM
Reply to  wardropper

Plutocracy and government in collusion is fascism.

From Far Away
From Far Away
Feb 1, 2021 2:06 PM
Reply to  wardropper

[It looks like it, it walks like it, it even quacks like it, but it is no longer democracy.]

Sorry, because the democracy is not behaving the way you would like it to, you seem to be making the “no true scotsman” argument.

Be assured: it is a democracy. And what you are experiencing today is one of the likely outcomes of an actual democracy.

It is called “tyranny of the majority” linking up with propaganda and “madness of the crowd.” I.e., democracy at play.

I suggest you stop trying to sugar-coat it because simply because it is the thing you have so earnestly believed in for years.

zdb
zdb
Jan 31, 2021 10:32 PM
Reply to  Minton Lee

How?

Arby
Arby
Jan 31, 2021 10:41 PM
Reply to  Minton Lee

Democracy can only work well within a true theocracy. In which case, it won’t be democracy, but that’s okay. I accept democracy, but with qualification. When I started my religious studies, I was led to believe that you have rule by man, namely democracy, and you have rule by God, which is called theocracy. I simplistically rejected democracy. Then I matured. I came to realize that there’s much about democracy that God would approve of. The thing he obviously doesn’t approve of is the idea that we are God and we, alone, rule. That’s not reality, but it is arrogance and a fatal one at that.

John Paul Mason
John Paul Mason
Feb 1, 2021 12:37 AM
Reply to  Minton Lee

..

From Far Away
From Far Away
Feb 1, 2021 2:01 PM
Reply to  Minton Lee

[Democratic government is the only umpire that gives the people power.]

You could have fooled me.

I have almost zero power. In my democracy, against my will, I am locked into my house with curfews. In my democracy, against my will, I am forced to wear a mask when I am allowed to go out and about.

Want to try again that blurb about “democratic government” giving the people power?

Arby
Arby
Jan 31, 2021 6:13 PM
Reply to  wardropper

The author is entitled to his views, and he knows stuff about money that I don’t know (which is easy to do; I’m cluleless), but I just don’t see the world I’m familiar with reflected in his statements. Nation States have been an illusion for some time. He doesn’t seem to be aware of that fact. I don’t believe in money and I don’t believe that we’ll have a money system in the new world (beyond Klaus Schwab’s nightmare). The tanks of Hitler are rolling over all of our borders, figuratively speaking, and he’s oblivious. In a way, he hides his head in the sand. I sort of don’t have time for it. But he’s not alone in that. It’s not just cattle who do that. All kinds of people are putting their heads in the sand. People who are ignorant and scared. The informed and the uninformed. Those who have smarts but just don’t care enough to know, even though, when it interests them (or, I suppose, when it is profitable to them) they’ll care enough to know. In which case, that’s deficient ‘limited’ caring.

If you are reading these comments David, What is your view of covid 19? My view is that it’s a huge, harmful, criminal hoax, perpetrated (as was 9/11) by powerful special interests who play God – at our expense. Catherine Austin Fitts also thinks that CBDC will be too hard for them to pull off, but lets not forget that they need that in order to enslave us. They can certainly do other things, but that one’s a bigger. Even Fitts noted that they are seeking to take away our independence, which physical cash gives us. Even if I can’t enter a supermarket to buy food, I can probably pay some fine, upstanding (bovine) citizen to do that for me, not that I’d enjoy that or can really afford it.

David Meredith
David Meredith
Jan 31, 2021 9:49 PM
Reply to  Arby

You’re right: 1st Hoax was HIV-AIDS, 2nd Hoax was 9/11, 3rd Hoax is Covid-19. There is interesting symmetry on these too with Fauci on the 1st Bush Senior & Junior on the 2nd and Fauci on the 3rd. Let’s hope the pyramid of deception is complete and this is the end of Hoaxes.

zdb
zdb
Jan 31, 2021 10:38 PM
Reply to  David Meredith

There might be a few other psych ops besides those three. Your hopium brings to mind another psyop. Those are good ones though. Recognizing damage is the first step needed for repair.

Mike Ellwood (Oxon UK)
Mike Ellwood (Oxon UK)
Jan 31, 2021 10:31 PM
Reply to  Arby

You might be interested in the book: “Reclaiming the State”, by Bill Mitchell and Thomas Fazi. It may challenge some of your views slightly, but think you are big enough to stand up to that.

Arby
Arby
Jan 31, 2021 10:39 PM

If there are States in the new world that Jehovah God will allow his people to build, they won’t be anything like what we’ve seen. We will have a proper one world government, namely Jehovah’s Kingdom (represented in his deputy King, Jesus Christ aka Michael). We will have to side with truth, and acknowledge all truths, including the big ones. After that, What we build will be whatever we decide to build. There will be no liars, exploiters or thieves in that new world. Everyone will do honest work. No one will enslave or be enslaved. It won’t be permitted. Those are my views for what it’s worth. Would Bill and Thomas be interested in that?

JuraCalling
JuraCalling
Jan 31, 2021 4:41 PM

Talking of ‘reset’…..

Are you ready for the sheeple to learn to be excited by vaccinations ?

As we know, it’s easy to train a monkey. Just give it a few social network accounts and get it to log on regularly and watch.

Soon you’ll witness one of natures most subtle of miracles. It’s called Monkey-see-monkey-do.

This phenomenon is rife among those who lack the desire to have an idea of their own and would sink to any depth to be called ‘cool’ or ‘hilarious’ by a herd of monkeys equally as stupid.

Remember the infamous Ice Bucket Challenge ? (”Look everyone, I’m pouring a bucket of ice over myself- give me a like”.) Then came the selfie.( yaaawn) . Spend 25% of your time in a mirror posing and the other 75% forgetting everyone and everything outside of your own image and appearance, to take fascinating snaps of yourself to plaster on the internet (like all the other monkeys).Then, wait for the insincere, unoriginal compliments.

This is why the elite created these pens. Get all the sheep in one pen and fill it with reasons to never leave. The perfect observation unit. You can read their words so you can read their minds by that route. It doesn’t take long.

So we recently had fake accounts and failed models and ex drama students unable to attract employment posing as tragic victims of covid. And even more ‘modelling’ masks to look like they can be ‘fashion accessories’. You can get them to match tops or hats or both. If it’s cold where you are you can match them with gloves too. There’s no end to variations of looking like a dick.

So now comes the stroke of genius. Those cheeky little ‘ Behavioural Scientists’ have had a word with Gates et al. He, in turn, has been in touch with those who accept his ‘charitable donations’. The result is- wait for it- vaccine selfies- or ”vaxxies”.

 So, line up, idiots. Take of your Chanel mask and smile at the nice man with the poison..

Front page of the Guardian has it’s fake stooge posing on page 1. They can check their bank balance later.

https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/world/what-a-great-shot-vaccination-selfies-become-the-latest-social-media-hit/ar-BB1dfITv?ocid=mailsignout&li=AAnZ9Ug

Mick
Mick
Jan 31, 2021 6:09 PM
Reply to  JuraCalling

Modern equivalent of a suicide note. ‘Remember me thus’

zdb
zdb
Jan 31, 2021 11:06 PM
Reply to  JuraCalling

Remember the famous Darwin selfies of people’s videos as they get killed by something they filmed but did not forsee?

Curious how quick and accurate social media can be compared to the corporate pravda media, in spite of the manipulation and censorship applied by GSK/Google et al.

Ran across an idea on Twitter last night. Almost no one knows 2 people dead of cv1984. actual cv1984 – not an 84 year old morbidly obese diabetic on dialysis. In 1918, allegedly 1 in 3 people were very sick with flu (later turned out 10% viral, 90% bacterial) and 1 in 30 died.

Hence in each of our circles of 200 or 300 people who we know and deal with directly, we would know 100 seriously sick folk – damaged, and at least 10 dead – all in the last year. And each of person in our circle would know that many. That’s one degree of separation. Add a layer. Go 2 degrees. Everyone in your circle of 300 should know that many. No one in my circle of 300 knows anyone in their circle.

Now consider vaccines. VAERS already admits to .03% fatality rate on cv1984 vaccines. That’s 3 in 10,000. Your second degree of separation gets you your 300 people multiplied by each of the next degree of separation’s 300 people. That’s 90,000 people in the second degree of separation.

Even though CDC claims cv1984 has killed 1 in 1000 in the US, my first two circles in 2 degrees of separation (90,000 people) have zero. Now do that for the vaccine. VAERS admits to 1 death in 3,330 vaccines. Harvard studies indicate VAERS is under-reported by 99%. So the number is probably closer to 100 when the smoke clears (if ever).

Now even though, CDC et al are already starting to blame cv1984 and comorbidities for vaccine deaths, how many people in each of our first two degrees of separation are going to die shortly after a vaccine before we wise up like folks in Gibralter did with 53 deaths in a population of 30,000 in the first couple weeks after vaccination?

From this 50,000′ view, if I were a betting man, I might expect in the next couple months to find out about 10 deaths in my first degree of separation circle (300 people) and 300 deaths in my second degree of separation circle (90,000 people). That number will vary depending on how pro and anti vax the people in my circles are.

The meme version of this math:
Notice how everyone died of cv1984 in 2020 and never from comorbidities?
Notice how everyone dies of comorbidities and cv1984 in 2021 and never from vaccines?

Minton Lee
Minton Lee
Jan 31, 2021 4:32 PM

‘’ it will require a jettisoning of the circular arguments of neo-classical economics – to reimpose some sort of control over the quantity of money. ‘’

There is already control over money supply, You don’t need to change the world to limit money supply, you just need to stop the central banks printing it. The problem is the US cannot address its own economic woes, and get off the ‘crack pipe’ of QE.

Wombat
Wombat
Feb 1, 2021 3:01 AM
Reply to  Minton Lee

Notwithstanding the recent bout of American Government money “printing’, the vast majority of money creation is by commercial banks, not central banks.

https://www.bankofengland.co.uk/-/media/boe/files/quarterly-bulletin/2014/money-creation-in-the-modern-economy.pdf

Minton Lee
Minton Lee
Jan 31, 2021 4:26 PM

Derivatives are not ‘bets’, they should be regarded as insurance. We don’t worry about the size of the insurance market and we shouldn’t. Even if there is a total markets collapse, it does not necessarily mean that all derivatives will be called upon to deliver.

Martin Usher
Martin Usher
Jan 31, 2021 6:15 PM
Reply to  Minton Lee

Insurance is a bet — I pay money to my insurer to indemnify me if I crash my car or my house burns down. How much I have to pay for this service depends on their actuaries, people they pay to work out the odds of a particular event happening.

I generally trust insurance companies and bookmakers because they’re working with tangible things. They make the odds and they make money on the spread. Derivative traders aren’t interested in what they’re ‘insuring’, they make the money on the trades, so they have an incentive to pump up the market, selling bets upon bets until its so leveraged that a slight dislocation could bring everything crashing down.

Margin call
Margin call
Jan 31, 2021 7:11 PM
Reply to  Martin Usher

”Derivatives can be used for insuring against price movements (hedging), increasing exposure to price movements for speculation, or getting access to otherwise hard-to-trade assets or markets.”

Ben
Ben
Jan 31, 2021 4:06 PM

.
Printed in the Spectator
.
comment image

Minton Lee
Minton Lee
Jan 31, 2021 4:13 PM
Reply to  Ben

You’ve got to balance that against the increase in Amazon’s market share in the UK, which is the preoccupation of the British PM and his ministers. Remember every percentage point increase means million & million in kickbacks, I mean speaking fees.

George Mc
George Mc
Jan 31, 2021 4:21 PM
Reply to  Ben

Hey but “People before profits” as my woke virtue signalling boss says to us less aware toilers.

Minton Lee
Minton Lee
Jan 31, 2021 5:15 PM
Reply to  George Mc

There’s nothing wrong with virture.

JuraCalling
JuraCalling
Jan 31, 2021 5:49 PM
Reply to  Minton Lee

He said ‘virtue signaller‘. That’s very different to virtue.

George Mc
George Mc
Jan 31, 2021 7:01 PM
Reply to  JuraCalling

I would say that virtue signalling is a contradiction in terms i.e. true virtue doesn’t need to be signalled.

JuraCalling
JuraCalling
Jan 31, 2021 7:24 PM
Reply to  George Mc

My point exactly. The signal is ”hey listen and watch me..how enlightened am I”. fake sentiments from shallow attention seekers..

Margin call
Margin call
Jan 31, 2021 7:12 PM
Reply to  JuraCalling

Nothing wrong in signalling virtue.

JuraCalling
JuraCalling
Jan 31, 2021 7:23 PM
Reply to  Margin call

If it needs to come with a signal it isn’t genuine virtue. hat’s wrong with just being honest or just demonstrating virtue.

image
image
Jan 31, 2021 4:21 PM
Reply to  Ben

Dont have children them its simple
Parents haven’t been looking after there children aka deatheducation system & the minute they have time of they cant handle having the children at home with them due to stress ! ay

wardropper
wardropper
Jan 31, 2021 4:49 PM
Reply to  image

Yes, it’s simple.
But if the children are already there?
The general public had no idea what was coming, and most of them still have no idea what has actually arrived.
It is a heartbreaking situation, and ‘the authorities’, by their cowardice, bear all the responsibility for it.

Rubicon
Rubicon
Jan 31, 2021 9:22 PM
Reply to  Ben

And you think that’s a revelation? Read Western European history. Single women who simply couldn’t afford to feed & house their children were forced to abandon them. Happened ALL the time in just that part of the globe. Ditto for all the others.

George Mc
George Mc
Jan 31, 2021 3:58 PM

http://www.wrongkindofgreen.org/2020/03/19/the-show-must-go-on-event-201-the-2019-fictional-pandemic-exercise-world-economic-forum-gates-foundation-et-al/

This is an article about Event 201 which I’m sure most OG visitors must be well aware of. But what struck me is the sheer unavoidable and indeed screaming “dot connection” hanging there between this high-level simulation exercise concerned with a global pandemic built around a fictionalized naturally occurring coronavirus and the emergence of the “actual” coronavirus a mere 5 months later. Only the fanatically applied proscription on “conspiracy theory” can explain the stubbornly persisting lack of suspicion.

So, it’s sad to see even this article regurgitate the common sentiment:

As the old adage goes, never let a good crisis go to waste.

The aforementioned conspiracy phobia has penetrated even here.

2BAD
2BAD
Jan 31, 2021 3:48 PM

After being de-platformed 3 times from YouTube, and having more than 50 videos removed, I have now switched to Rumble and just posted my first video. The first video addresses the origin of COVID-19. I think this is an important subject. The reason I made this video, is because I find that people are asking the wrong questions.

https://rumble.com/vdffdl-ep.-1-the-root-of-the-evil-2bad.html

Minton Lee
Minton Lee
Jan 31, 2021 4:43 PM
Reply to  2BAD

‘’Socialism: The Root of Evil’’
Really? I see your campaign to stop the American people, 100 million of them, get access to healthcare is going well, with the current political system. I doubt you even know you are a Corporate shill. And I don’t let Youtube decide who my heroes are, thanks.

Malcolm Reynolds
Malcolm Reynolds
Feb 3, 2021 2:08 AM
Reply to  Minton Lee

 I see your campaign to stop the American people, 100 million of them, get access to healthcare is going well”

Access is called paying for the services you use.

JuraCalling
JuraCalling
Jan 31, 2021 5:55 PM
Reply to  2BAD

Nothing like a bit of spammy self promotion i suppose..

a few points.

Global pandemics happen beyond America. So it doesn’t matter about any of the bullshit the founding fathers put on paper.

The child’s guide to shilling led to you making the distinction between truth and lies.You then talk about truth and lies Re Covid and support neither sufficiently.

Judith
Judith
Feb 1, 2021 3:03 AM
Reply to  2BAD

Thank you.

Ted
Ted
Jan 31, 2021 3:43 PM

This article is written by someone who thinks that “money” (bank credit in this case) exists in a splendid isolation from anything else in the world. It does not. It is part of a larger system of capital flows and real-world wealth creation (highways, hospitals, hotels, hot plates, homes, etc. etc.) Read Michael Hudson, David Graeber, and David Harvey then come back with a more informed perspective and we can have an adult conversation about the precarious state of the global economy.

George Mc
George Mc
Jan 31, 2021 3:31 PM

Another Day in the Life of George McDenisovich

So I went round to visit my son in sheltered living and was surprised to find that, instead of being asked to stand outside in the freezing cold like last time, a young male member of staff invited me in since I was in the relevant “bubble”. So I went in and had a nice chat with my boy.

Then a couple of women came in and one seemed a bit nervous and told me I shouldn’t have been inside. I didn’t want to get the young guy in trouble, so I didn’t mention that it was he who invited me in. I suggested that they just keep quite about me being inside, but the woman said something about the boss finding out and I had an impression that the boss was going to find out. And probably from one of the women. I then got a bit about how they “could only advise me” and there was such an unpleasant atmosphere that I left shortly after that.

But whilst driving away, I started to wonder if I was in trouble now. Perhaps worst of all, when I told my wife, she said I shouldn’t have gone in etc.

Now I am thinking, what fresh hell is this? What kind of world are we now living in? Will I end up in prison? It’s like Orwell on steroids. Or one of Kafka’s claustrophobic nightmares. Or the Solzhenitsyn book I referenced above. Welcome to the gulag! Welcome to Auschwitz!

Mike Ellwood (Oxon UK)
Mike Ellwood (Oxon UK)
Jan 31, 2021 10:21 PM
Reply to  George Mc

If you haven’t already watched it George, this is for you:

Robin Monotti: Our Generation’s Eternal Fascism is COVID19’s Great Reset, We Must Fight It

Judith
Judith
Feb 1, 2021 3:11 AM
Reply to  George Mc

Sorry you had to go through that, George. I understand that feeing of fresh hell.

I’m just waiting for the first senior citizen in my apt complex to get the C. And I will be blamed. One of the tenants (if not more, but I know definitely one) reported me to the management company and I received a letter pronto.

I don’t care about the letter, but living a maskless life quite often has me questioning what would happen if someone I had contact with got a postive on a pcr.

This Covid was the absolute perfect psy op. Absolutely brilliant. Because they really do have each and everyone of us coming and going.

Marie
Marie
Feb 1, 2021 8:07 AM
Reply to  Judith

Here in the village I am beginning to understand the local rules. You can covertly socialise bit must outwardly profess your utter faith in the narrative. Your and George’s posts have given me a new insight into this; it’s a bit like the political dog-shit issue here. Everyone virtue signals how responsible dog owners they are but are simultaneously up for leaving that shit on your drive if they’re sure no one’s looking.

So having made my stance plain on this issue right back in March, now I understand a new layer to why the “rule breakers” won’t break them with me: that would be admitting the truth of it. They can only have dinner parties with others whom they trust to uphold that narrative outwardly.

They want to break the rules however it suits but at the same time keep on spouting that shitty programming that proves they are “the responsible ones“ and so remain protected from any comeback.

It’s starting to smell ripe like it’s more than simple naivety. Selfish two-faced scumbags.

Marie
Marie
Feb 1, 2021 8:19 AM
Reply to  Marie

But there’s more, isn’t there. I’m actually a liability for my outspoken stance; and so I am avoided.
But those others are forming their own “trusted“ “careful” circles whilst believing all the bullcrap they heard on the bbc and all while being certain that it’s not them but the dirty c-deniers are the ones causing the lockdowns etc to go on. Hypocrisy beyond belief.

Apologies for my waffling and thank you for your posts here.

Ben
Ben
Jan 31, 2021 2:41 PM

Florida = Freedom

People enjoying their lives in Florida free from lockdown fascism

https://twitter.com/justin_hart/status/1355671458635079685?s=20

Minton Lee
Minton Lee
Jan 31, 2021 3:35 PM
Reply to  Ben

We’ll soon hear that a lot of the US was not actually locked down at all. They put on a big show with New York and LA.

Nick
Nick
Jan 31, 2021 4:57 PM
Reply to  Minton Lee

I’ve heard anecdotal claims of exactly that.
America is a very different country, away from the major cities.

Martin Usher
Martin Usher
Jan 31, 2021 6:21 PM
Reply to  Minton Lee

The view from my little corner of the US is “What lockdown?”. It has affected us a bit from time to time but overall its been a bit of a non-event. Althoughj I’m a retiree I have been working part time for much of the last year and apart from the social distancing rules and the like business has been going on very much as before.

Margin call
Margin call
Jan 31, 2021 7:15 PM
Reply to  Martin Usher

Which area of US is that?

Fact Checker
Fact Checker
Jan 31, 2021 9:11 PM
Reply to  Martin Usher

“What lockdown?”. …overall its been a bit of a non-event. …I’m a retiree…

uh-huh. Got it.

Thanks again, borebot.

Judith
Judith
Feb 1, 2021 3:16 AM
Reply to  Martin Usher

But are your schools open full time with normal classes?

Are all sports ins schools being played as normal?

Are your libraries and churches open?

Community centers? Senior centers? Gyms, pools, theatres?

To me, being able to shop does not mean we are not in lockdown.

I’m not arguing with you Martin, I’m just wondering what everyone considers “lockdown”.

I think we have a 10 PM – 5 AM ridiculous curfew, but other than that we are allowed out of the house.

Unfortunately there’s nowhere to go.

Edwige
Edwige
Jan 31, 2021 4:32 PM
Reply to  Ben

‘Woke’ types prefer “freedumb” now to freedom.

This transformation of a society’s supposedly most fundamental value has happened like Hemingway said he became a millionaire, gradually then suddenly. There’s been the long-term undermining from “the long march through the institutions” (especially education) but the final capitulation has still been dramatic. There’s not even a pretending that the term has been merely re-defined, it’s an out-and-out rejection.

Sarah Jones
Sarah Jones
Jan 31, 2021 5:11 PM
Reply to  Ben

Is it free from CO-VAIDS?

SteveK9
SteveK9
Feb 2, 2021 5:59 PM
Reply to  Ben

Although one might believe that this is simply a difference in character between the inhabitants of Florida and California, political leadership cannot be underestimated here. A large amount of the credit goes to Governor DeSantis … who would be a great choice for President … of course, as Trump showed, he will need some help and could not go it alone.

Paul Vonharnish
Paul Vonharnish
Jan 31, 2021 2:32 PM

Note the Masonic number 33 as the “Federal” reserve address. It’s all been a numbers show, folks. The morbid and dysfunctional use of numbers for evaluating human life begins in the Old Testament… The entire Bible is a ritual satanic curse…
 
Federal Reserve Bank of New York – Wikipedia
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Reserve_Bank_of_New_York

Minton Lee
Minton Lee
Jan 31, 2021 4:09 PM

That’s right love, it’s them lizards that did it, init…..
CIA dis-info. trolling seems almost quant these days, sooooooo early naughties.

Paul Vonharnish
Paul Vonharnish
Jan 31, 2021 7:21 PM
Reply to  Minton Lee

Your point is???

Paul Vonharnish
Paul Vonharnish
Jan 31, 2021 7:49 PM

I can only laugh at the “meek” who knee jerk every time I comment negatively about their BLIND “faith”.

Revelation has little to do with prophesy, and every thing to do with reveling the “plan”.
1.) Let’s get completely corrupted morally and politically.
2.) Let’s sell our sons (and daughters) for thirty pieces of silver > Gospel of Matthew 26:15.
3.) Let’s poison the land, the air, and the water, and await the “redemption” of our fiat tokens.

It’s not a prophesy. It’s for profit – see? Get a grip…

Margin call
Margin call
Jan 31, 2021 1:04 PM

For all those of you who think that global business is not nationally marshalled by the USA to gain advantage over foreign competitors, see this story. How a US car firm, Tesla, is allowed to kill its customers during the Beta-testing of its products without any complaint from regulators, like Boeing and military contractors, who also test on the lives of the military men who use them. But unlike Volkswagen who were wrecked by the regulators.
Dumb animals were harmed during the testing of this product.

‘’Tesla under fire from Feds after failing to recall almost 160,000 cars | Auto Expert John Cadogan’’

Edwige
Edwige
Jan 31, 2021 1:01 PM

The ghastly Andrew Rawnsley reveals that the politco-media class have a new psychological manipulator they follow…. Daniel Kahneman.

Kahneman was psychologist to the IDF, a Research Fellow at Stanford and his works include ‘Focusing Illusion’. I’m not making this up. Apparently he argued that people can be persuaded that some catastrophe they’ve been put through was a good thing if they come out of it on an upswing. The relevance to our current situation isn’t hard to figure out.

Thom
Thom
Jan 31, 2021 2:15 PM
Reply to  Edwige

Yes, and I see Rawsley’s hero Tony Blair has been on manoeuvres again this morning in support of the government’s vaccine “rollout”. Things must be getting desperate.

image
image
Jan 31, 2021 4:29 PM
Reply to  Thom

dont worry Nigel said he would hire Blair in his new deform party as vaccinate tzar

Mike Ellwood (Oxon UK)
Mike Ellwood (Oxon UK)
Jan 31, 2021 10:12 PM
Reply to  image

I think they should make him personal supervisor of the anal swab task force.

Margin call
Margin call
Jan 31, 2021 12:52 PM

It is hard to know if what is happening with Gamestop is really as being depicted by the alternative media or not. Could it be the ‘gods’ fighting for power amongst themselves?

It looks like a number of powerful hedge funds are being brought down, by the ‘little guy’, but you cannot be sure that it is not the actions of the USA’s astronomically wealthy oligarchs, or even the CIA, who now want all this financial action under their control.
Again the ‘wit’ or irony of the name Robin-hood app, points to a Psyop.

image
image
Jan 31, 2021 4:29 PM
Reply to  Margin call

its a huge psyop

Martin Usher
Martin Usher
Jan 31, 2021 6:34 PM
Reply to  Margin call

I was told that one reason one of the hedge funds was in trouble was that it shorted over 100% of the stock. You may recall from the plot of the comedy “The Producers” that their scam of overselling investments in Broadway musicals was based on finding productions that were guaranteed to bomb. The humor comes from them overplaying their hand — they found a production, “Springtime for Hitler”, that looked dire on the surface but turned out to be a huge comedy hit. The production “GameStop” was like movie rental stores (e.g. “Blockbuster”), it was a business that was essentially transitory and maybe should have never been taken public and so almost inevitably going to fail so what was the down side of shorting the stock?

Behind this mess is a question relevent to this article. Without the intervention of the Redditors this stock would have quietly slipped away to zero. Who were the saps holding that stock? My guess is that directly or indirectly it was pension funds and the like. In order t extract money from a casino like the modern stock market there has to be ‘new’ money coming in and the most reliable source of new money is people’s 401(k) and IRA contributions.

Incidentally, any ‘little guys’ who are preening themselves about their sudden good fortune should bear two things in mind. One is that if that fortune is in stock then its not real unless its liquidated into cash. The other is as soon as is liquidated there will be a ‘taxable event’, the IRS and its state equivalents will be anxious to share in your good fortune which will be ‘short term capital gains’ which looks like ‘income’, more or less. The bite will hurt and more than one person has been caught by it coming after the actual money. One other thing that they’ll learn is that while the IRS likes their cut of your gains in cold, hard, cash — they definitely don’t believe in all this airey-fairey financial stuff — they’re a lot more stingy about allowing you to write of losses. Fellow Redditors are probably not going to be as much use dealing with the fallout as a nice, expensive, tax accountant.

S Cooper
S Cooper
Jan 31, 2021 12:51 PM

Something from RT

https://www.rt.com/usa/514157-dodger-stadium-vaccination-protest/

“Here is a possible slogan for the recall drive against Nasty NAnZI Pelosi’s idiot nephew by marriage. ‘the SCAMDEMIC is fake, the Newsom-Virus is not. Time for California to get rid of its head cold.'”

Margin call
Margin call
Jan 31, 2021 1:24 PM
Reply to  S Cooper

Why do you direct at the ‘left’, Trump invented this ‘miracle’ vaccine.

S Cooper
S Cooper
Jan 31, 2021 4:29 PM
Reply to  Margin call

“One takes it that you buy into the CORPORATE FASCIST SCAMDEMIC ‘BIG LIE’. The CORPORATE FASCIST OLIGARCH MOBSTER PSYCHOPATHS are playing you for a fool.”

Margin call
Margin call
Jan 31, 2021 12:25 PM

Gold will be confiscated (forced sale) on the first day of a dollar collapse, at threat of life imprisonment.

I believe the state are secretly promoting the buying of gold privately, via ‘alternative’ sites, to get as much of it in the country as possible.

If the fed bought it openly, like the Russians or the Chinese are doing, it would cause worry in the US currency markets and undermine the dollar, so they get you to buy it for them. They will force you to sell it to them at a discounted rate when thew hammer falls.

Sarah Jones
Sarah Jones
Jan 31, 2021 1:06 PM
Reply to  Margin call

It’s not even worth anything for jewellry. It is a sign of environmental destrcution and greed. The collapsing tech industry is not going to need gold. It is worthless. Nobody wants that bling in a flourishing garden based civilization. People are returning to their pristine origins and value flowers and seeds.

Monty
Monty
Jan 31, 2021 3:49 PM
Reply to  Sarah Jones

Are you bored?

dr death
dr death
Jan 31, 2021 2:23 PM
Reply to  Margin call

Finally somebody understands they are rerunning the great depression, a feature, not a bug of industrial capitalism…

Also not one mention in the article that perhaps the governors should issue their own currencies and dispense with the current private central banking system…. but then the racket it is would become plainly visible, denuded of financial gibberish the whole rotten edifice crumbles.

there are red flags all over this screed.

Monty
Monty
Jan 31, 2021 3:43 PM
Reply to  Margin call

Gold is readily available, I mean there are no shortages. If there were the markets would be in a panic right now. Meanwhile Silver is being shorted as it has done for years regardless of the fixers being heavily fined.

The whole thing is fixed anyway.

Minton Lee
Minton Lee
Jan 31, 2021 5:01 PM
Reply to  Monty

”Gold is readily available,”

Who said there was a shortage? The price determines the availability. That is the process of price discovery. Gold is high, historically because of rising inflation. Silver is much more of an industrial metal so responds to industrial demand as well, which I guess is low. The gold price may be partially manipulated, but broadly it does respond to inflation and currency risks.

JuraCalling
JuraCalling
Jan 31, 2021 7:46 PM
Reply to  Margin call

”I believe the state are secretly promoting the buying of gold privately, via ‘alternative’ sites, to get as much of it in the country as possible.”

That could be 100% wrong. There has to be good reasons to believe that. By good i mean rational. Obviously there’ll be no evidence of it. But rationale would lend it a bit of credibility.

keith
keith
Jan 31, 2021 11:38 AM

As usual, the hypocrites admit the truth when they think no one is watching. Biden’s white house press corps admit covid was fake on a hot mic.

https://www.bitchute.com/video/JUbIG17OA4er/

TingTong
TingTong
Jan 31, 2021 12:09 PM
Reply to  keith

That is as very old video, shown at the start of the ‘pandemic’. But still true, I’m sure. I find the vaccination claim odd. Why vaccinate if it is harmless.

Thom
Thom
Jan 31, 2021 2:20 PM
Reply to  TingTong

It could be a delaying tactic. If there were no vaccines, governments would have needed a lockdown exit strategy before now. Or possibly the vaccines are some kind of face-saving exit to ‘explain’ covid ‘disappearing’ (if it ever does). And the vaccines can be weaponised for diplomatic reasons. Most likely primarily the former, though, IMO.

Minton Lee
Minton Lee
Jan 31, 2021 3:43 PM
Reply to  Thom

Yes I have been running that model in my head too. That would be RELATIVELY good news if that were the case. It means they have an exit strategy. In which case they would be trying to save as many Oppressive measures and Economic advantages as they can, from the whole exercise.

I would add, the Covid operation now means, we the public, know far too much about what they are doing to us, than we ever did before. That is a problem for them.

JuraCalling
JuraCalling
Jan 31, 2021 7:43 PM
Reply to  TingTong

The more pertinent question is why vaccinate if you ( the manufacturers) have stated it neither gets rid of Covid or prevents it. If it’s components aren’t designed to kill it or prevent it why is it important to have it ? What is it designed to do ?

Judith
Judith
Jan 31, 2021 12:30 PM
Reply to  keith

There is some question as to when this video was taped. It may be months old and still part of Trump administration? Not that it matters, but it is probably wise of this fellow to let people know.

Margin call
Margin call
Jan 31, 2021 1:27 PM
Reply to  Judith

It was right at the start of the ‘pandemic’. The news then was about them claiming they were vaccinated, long long before we even thought a vaccine was possible. The very low death rate was known in March 2020.