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Dismantling the Constitution: Police No Longer Have to Honor the Right to Remain Silent

John W. Whitehead & Nisha Whitehead

Audio Version New Feature!

“That was when they suspended the Constitution. They said it would be temporary. There wasn’t even any rioting in the streets. People stayed home at night, watching television, looking for some direction. There wasn’t even an enemy you could put your finger on.”
Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale

We are witnessing the gradual dismantling of every constitutional principle that serves as a bulwark against government tyranny, overreach and abuse.

As usual, the latest assault comes from the U.S. Supreme Court.

In a 6-3 ruling in Vega v. Tekoh, the Supreme Court took aim at the Miranda warnings, which require that police inform suspects that they have a right against self-incrimination when in police custody: namely, that they have a right to remain silent, to have an attorney present, and that anything they say and do can and will be used against them in a court of law.

Although the Supreme Court stopped short of overturning its 1966 ruling in Miranda v. Arizona, the conservative majority declared that individuals cannot hold police accountable for violating their Fifth Amendment right to remain silent.

By shielding police from lawsuits arising from their failure to Mirandize suspects, the Supreme Court has sent a message to police that they no longer have to respect a suspect’s right to remain silent.

In other words, concludes legal analyst Nick Sibilla, “the Supreme Court has effectively created a new legal immunity for cops accused of infringing on the Fifth Amendment’s protection against self-incrimination.”

Why is this important?

In totality, the rights enshrined in the Fifth Amendment speak to the Founders’ determination to protect the rights of the individual against a government with a natural inclination towards corruption, tyranny and thuggery.

The Founders were especially concerned with balancing the scales of justice in such a way that the innocent and the accused were not railroaded and browbeaten by government agents into coerced confessions, false convictions, or sham trials.

Indeed, so determined were the Founders to safeguard the rights of the innocent, even if it meant allowing a guilty person to go free, that Benjamin Franklin insisted, “It is better a hundred guilty persons should escape than one innocent person should suffer.”

Two hundred-plus years later, the Supreme Court (aided and abetted by the police state, Congress and Corporate America) has flipped that longstanding presumption of innocence on its head.

In our present suspect society, “we the people” are all presumed guilty until proven innocent.

With the Vega ruling, we have even fewer defenses for warding off government chicanery, abuse, threats and entrapment.

To be clear, the Supreme Court is not saying that we don’t have the right to remain silent when in police custody. It’s merely saying that we can’t sue the police for violating that right.

It’s a subtle difference but a significant one that could well encourage police to engage in the very sort of egregious misconduct at the heart of the Vega case: in which a police officer investigating a sexual assault isolated a suspect in a small, windowless room; refused him access to a lawyer or work colleagues; accused him of molesting a female patient; threatened him with violence; implied that he and his family would be deported; and terrorized him into signing a false confession dictated by the cop.

Although Terence Tekoh was eventually tried and acquitted, the Supreme Court refused to hold police accountable for browbeating an innocent man into making a false confession.

The Vega ruling threatens to turn the clocks back to a time when police resorted to physical brutality (beating, hanging, whipping) and mental torture in order to obtain confessions from suspects without ever informing them of their Fifth Amendment rights.

This was exactly the kind of misconduct that the Warren Court sought to discourage with its 5-4 ruling in Miranda v. Arizona.

As the Court concluded in Miranda almost 60 years ago:

The prosecution may not use statements, whether exculpatory or inculpatory, stemming from custodial interrogation of the defendant unless it demonstrates the use of procedural safeguards effective to secure the privilege against self-incrimination.

By custodial interrogation, we mean questioning initiated by law enforcement officers after a person has been taken into custody or otherwise deprived of his freedom of action in any significant way.

As for the procedural safeguards to be employed, unless other fully effective means are devised to inform accused persons of their right of silence and to assure a continuous opportunity to exercise it, the following measures are required.

Prior to any questioning, the person must be warned that he has a right to remain silent, that any statement he does make may be used as evidence against him, and that he has a right to the presence of an attorney, either retained or appointed. The defendant may waive effectuation of these rights, provided the waiver is made voluntarily, knowingly and intelligently. If, however, he indicates in any manner and at any stage of the process that he wishes to consult with an attorney before speaking, there can be no questioning.

Likewise, if the individual is alone and indicates in any manner that he does not wish to be interrogated, the police may not question him. The mere fact that he may have answered some questions or volunteered some statements on his own does not deprive him of the right to refrain from answering any further inquiries until he has consulted with an attorney and thereafter consents to be questioned.

The end result as one analyst notes:

Miranda v. Arizona, in creating the ‘Miranda Rights’ we take for granted today, reconciled the increasing police powers of the state with the basic rights of individuals.”

By largely doing away with Miranda, the Supreme Court has made its present position clear: anything goes if you’re a cop in the American police state.

Indeed, pay close to attention to the Court’s rulings lately, and the broader picture that emerges is of a judiciary that is playing fast and loose with the rule of law, picking and choose which rights to uphold and which can be discarded, in order to expand the power of the police state at the expense of the people’s rights.

If left unchecked, this constitutionally illiterate ruling will open the door to a new era of police abuses.

By shielding police from charges of grave misconduct while throwing the book at Americans for violating any of a rapidly expanding assortment of so-called crimes, the government has created a world in which there are two sets of laws: one set for the government and its gun-toting agents, and another set for you and me.

If you’re a cop in the American police state, you can already break the law in a myriad of ways without suffering any major, long-term consequences.

Indeed, not only are cops protected from most charges of wrongdoing—whether it’s shooting unarmed citizens (including children and old people), raping and abusing young women, falsifying police reports, trafficking drugs, or soliciting sex with minors—but even on the rare occasions when they are fired for misconduct, it’s only a matter of time before they get re-hired again.

For instance, police officer Jackie Neal was accused of putting his hands inside a woman’s panties, lifting up her shirt and feeling her breasts during a routine traffic stop. He remained on the police force. A year later, Neal was accused of digitally penetrating another woman. Still, he wasn’t fired or disciplined.

A few years after that, Neal—then serving as supervisor of the department’s youth program—was suspended for three days for having sex with a teenage girl participating in the program. As Reuters reports, “Neal never lost a dime in pay or a day off patrol: The union contract allowed him to serve the suspension using vacation days.”

Later that same year, Neal was arrested on charges that he handcuffed a woman in the rear seat of his police vehicle and then raped her. He was eventually fined $5,000 and sentenced to 14 months in prison, with five months off for “work and education.” The taxpayers of San Antonio got saddled with $500,000 to settle the case.

Now here’s the kicker: when the local city council attempted to amend the police union contract to create greater accountability for police misconduct, the police unions flexed their muscles and engaged in such a heated propaganda campaign that the city backed down.

This is how perverse justice in America has become, and it’s happening all across the country.

Incredibly, while our own constitutional protections against government abuses continue to be dismantled, a growing number of states are adopting Law Enforcement Officers’ Bill of Rights (LEOBoR)—written by police unions—which provides police officers accused of a crime with special due process rights and privileges not afforded to the average citizen.

In other words, the LEOBoR protects police officers from being treated as we are treated during criminal investigations: questioned unmercifully for hours on end, harassed, harangued, browbeaten, denied food, water and bathroom breaks, subjected to hostile interrogations, and left in the dark about our accusers and any charges and evidence against us.

These LEOBoRs epitomize everything that is wrong with America today.

Now every so often, police officers engaged in wrongdoing are actually charged for abusing their authority and using excessive force against American citizens. Occasionally, those officers are even sentenced for their crimes against the citizenry.

Yet in just about every case, it’s still the American taxpayer who foots the bill.

The ones who rarely ever feel the pinch are the officers accused or convicted of wrongdoing, “even if they are disciplined or terminated by their department, criminally prosecuted, or even imprisoned.”

In fact, police officers are more likely to be struck by lightning than be held financially accountable for their actions.

No matter which way you spin it, “we the people” are always on the losing end of the deal.

With the Supreme Court’s ruling in Vega v. Tekoh, the scales of justice have shifted out of balance even more.

Brace yourselves: as I make clear in my book Battlefield America: The War on the American People and in its fictional counterpart The Erik Blair Diaries, things are about to get downright ugly.

Constitutional attorney and author John W. Whitehead is founder and president of The Rutherford Institute. His book Battlefield America: The War on the American People (SelectBooks, 2015) is available online at www.amazon.com. Whitehead can be contacted at [email protected]

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Joe Van Steenbergen
Joe Van Steenbergen
Jul 20, 2022 4:39 AM

The Court has been co-opted since at least the Kelo decision, which allowed governments to seize private property for corporate exploitation. Then Roberts decided to rewrite the law (something the court NEVER did before) to save Obamacare. If there were any question about the political, and corrupt, nature of the court, these 2 decisions, among others. removed any question. Given this history, is there any mystery here about this most recent decision?

Anne-Marie Mazur
Anne-Marie Mazur
Jul 17, 2022 4:44 PM

First of all, there’s no such thing as “rights”. They’re a myth. George Carlin does a wonderful routine about this topic. I suggest people give it a listen and really LISTEN to what he said.

Next, the only time you’re “rights” are read to you is if you are going to be formally questioned. Police NEVER read people their rights otherwise. Clearly no one here has ever been accosted by the armed thugs of the STATE or you’d all know that. Reading people their “rights” is a propagandized MYTH people bahleeve because they’ve watched TV with all those “cops care about us” shows shoved up your ass for your entire existence.

At this stage of the game, this author should KNOW for a FACT that “rights” are fictitious.

From the mouth of a supreme court “justice” himself:

Charles Evans Hughes. “We are under a Constitution, but the Constitution is what the judges say it is.”

So, the words on paper mean NOTHING if they can be “interpreted” by someone who believes they are “smarter” than the rest of us who actually have reading comprehension skills. If something doesn’t mean exactly what the F it says, it doesn’t mean ANYTHING at all. How do people think this gas-lighting BS known as The LAW works to repress and oppress the underlings anyway? Read Fred Rodell, John Hasnas, a wonderful work called War Making and State Making as Organized Crime, Torture and Plea Bargaining, and Marx’s, The Debates and the Law and the Thefts of Wood.

That should be enough to get you started. A nice examination of what a load of idealist BS “classical liberalism” really is. I’ll take MATERIAL REALITY for 600, please, Alex.

I’d know, my husband and I were jailed multiple times for protesting the armed men of the state harassing us—while INSIDE OUR OWN HOME. And the federal district court upheld my “conviction” of endless rights violations. They will simply tell you that the reasonable man, (the JUDGE) would have arrived at the same conclusion as the lower court judge. It doesn’t matter one bit if the lower court judge violated every one of your rights. They will simply LIE and divert the sophistry from material reality (facts are not actually facts in law, they are simply statements made under oath—because that’s gonna make a lying dog tell the truth, lol!) Any facts in YOUR favor stating reality will be IGNORED completely. Habeas Corpus is a myth. The district court judge will simply invoke the ready made AEDPA to bullshit their way out of your so-called “constitutional rights”.

Time to stop believing in fairy tales, boys and girls.

Sunface Jack
Sunface Jack
Jul 16, 2022 12:47 PM

There is always a problem with any monopoly. The issue is that the constitution is supposed to be a guide for the courts to protect citizens from the abuse by Government once they surrender their rights by voting. They give consent to be Governed. This has become a massive problem created by the Party System where parliament can take away fundamental protection and inalienable rights under pretexts like emergencies or  ‘crisis’ of a ‘deadly’ disease etc. by using gang tactics of collaboration between the larger parties. It is hugely problematic. We se how the courts have become bought and paid for.
The problem is that the Government have a monopoly of power in the police, the military, the courts and the judiciary. They create a partnership using PPP with the BAR. This is the very reason why there is a second amendment to the US constitution. It is to prevent the Government from disarming the public. Every country where citizens surrender this right, they are subjected to tyranny.
Some essential reading:
https://mises.org/wire/brief-history-repressive-regimes-and-their-gun-laws.
https://margaretannaalice.substack.com/p/discussion-thread-gun-rights-vs-gun/comments?
https://johnwaters.substack.com/p/rip-bunreacht-1937-2022?

Thomas Frey
Thomas Frey
Jul 15, 2022 3:24 PM

Anyone that says the Declaration of Independence, Constitution and Bill of Rights are powerless or meaningless, are ignoring that we were warned many times over that keeping our Representative Constitutional Republic would require constant vigilance. We the people have failed at that responsibility.

Just because the guards of our government have become tyrants doesn’t mean the documents are dead, it means that those documents that represent a contract with our government, have been breached. The remedy for breach is clearly expressed in the second amendment.

We the people will have to make a choice, likely before 2030, to risk dying in the fight for individual Liberty, else live on our knees.

The Tree of Liberty is thirsty.

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jul 15, 2022 5:18 PM
Reply to  Thomas Frey

You may well say that the people here failed about those things that Ben Franklin famously cried out in Philadelphia, “Yes, m’am, if you can keep it,” but they had a whole lot of
subversive, organized, clandestine “help” in that regard from those pirates disguised by history as our leaders. A “hidden” network of them.

I have always felt in my bones that the plight of people here may have been best depicted by that Eastern allegory of “bees trapped in a bottle.”

That is, a very far-ranging and conscious and subversive program of “mind conttol”. The iron architecture of consent, fabricated.

PRE-fabricated.

Rob Rob
Rob Rob
Jul 17, 2022 2:06 AM
Reply to  Thomas Frey

Good point. Even if the founding fathers were hipocrites , in the stupid system of law, we must use any piece of data against these lying sacks of shit

too bad they determine this with a small group of intellectually and religiously inbred morons who don’t even understand what document that they were supposed to enforce

WE KNOW WHERE YOU LIVE
WE KNOW WHERE YOU LIVE
Jul 15, 2022 9:55 AM

I am not here for US political issues. I would prefer a european / worldwide focus. This applies especially to a certain other “issue ” which is only really an issue in the US and a few other backwaters where religious hate dogma still rules.

Whether an armed cop reads you your rights before kidnapping you is really small potatoes at the moment.

WE KNOW WHERE YOU LIVE
WE KNOW WHERE YOU LIVE
Jul 15, 2022 9:57 AM

constitution? pull another one!

Thomas Frey
Thomas Frey
Jul 15, 2022 3:34 PM

Did someone put a gun to your head and make you come here?

bleak
bleak
Jul 15, 2022 12:20 AM

Speaking of shredding the Constitution, “Bill S: 2938” (“the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act”) was “approved” in “the House” by a vote of 230-190, and was “officially” signed into “law” on June 25th by traitor and lecherous pedo Joe Biden.

This new law will help reduce gun violence by:

Expanding access to mental health care both in schools and communities.

Bolstering background checks to buy a gun for people under the age of 21.

Adding convicted domestic violence abusers to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System.

Yeah, right. Next up, more false-flag gun events like the one in Uvalde, TX, then onto, in the words of congress creature Mike Doyle…

getting military-grade weapons out of civilian hands.

Sure. Good luck with that, creatures. Not here. Not now. Not ever.

STARR
STARR
Jul 14, 2022 10:48 PM

The constitution is an illusion. Come on. These so called “founding fathers” were crooks, criminals, and pyramid scheme creators, too. The Rothschild’s and the Rockefeller’s were their buddies.

Thomas Frey
Thomas Frey
Jul 15, 2022 3:19 PM
Reply to  STARR

First the Rockefellers weren’t a powerful family until the 1800s.

Second Rothschild came into America only when Alexander Hamilton allowed them to invest in the first USA central bank. Meaning Alexander Hamilton was the trader in that instance. When that first bank was dissolved in 1811, Rothschild coerced the Crown of England to initiate the war of 1812, in hopes of the USA creating debt that would open the door again for them.

If any countries on this earth are wholely owned by Rothschild it is England and Israel.

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jul 15, 2022 3:52 PM
Reply to  STARR

WHOAAA! You forgot: pirates & buccaneers. In Heaven, revelations tell us that the foundations are of precious stones.

It’s my pet theory that the “real” government, down here, on terra firma, USA Inc, was incorporated atop the skulls and bones of pirates and their collateral damage. Victims of the Indian Opium Wars et al.

I find that suggested by the brilliant four word title and judgement of Reinhold Niebuhr (an even bigger influence on MLK than Gandhi):

“THE IRONY OF AMERICAN HISTORY”

You try to cash the check America gives you, on its promises of decency and freedom, and as MLK perorated poetically in “I Have a Dream Today” it comes back stamped “insufficient funds”.

For us. Not the pirates, they got plenty. Mostly ours.

As is the wont of pirates, the abuse goes on for many as a really -existing “freedom” as Chomsky would shill it. Freedom of the High Seas, applied elsewhere. Freedom to “walk the plank”.

Constitutionally speaking, I remember a little guy getting on an inner-city bus in East Cleveland, a route, my only transport on a long trip where I was daily the only person of non-African descent, so I got to record a lot of meaningful sights. This renegade from justice was wearing a tshirt, perhaps for my own cultural edification, the front of which said, “Have I got an attitude?”

I turned to see what might be possibly on the back side as he boarded and walked by: “My people went without a paycheck for 400 YEARS! You’re damn right I’ve got an attitude!”

400 years. “Do the math”. Such an anomaly could only endure in a land long marooned from other nations, founded and isolated by and for pirates, expert in high seas art of camouflage and disguise, where its war-ready profile and guns are flying false flags: “Le Jolie Rouge”, one where in the twinkling of a greedy eye that “Jolly Roger” suddenly raises the “Skull & Bones” matey.

Ah. THAT “Constitutional” switcheroo!

“What you bought is what you got!”

£4£&$4$+my2¢ ~~~~

“America … just a nation of 200 hundred million used car salesmen with all the money we need to buy guns and no qualms at all about killing anybody else in the world who tries to make us uncomfortable.” (Hunter S.)

Forget, now then, about “getting over ourselves” !!

Dial “Alcoholics Anonymous”: they’re at least 200 million of us that need “an Intervention” Soon.

Moscow. Beijing: are you listening? (I know, I know, the blinded leading the blind.)

On a more constructive note, ibid. (Reinhold Niebuhr, who had a way with the language):

“It is my strong conviction that a realist concept of human nature should be made the servant of an ethic of progressive justice, and not turned into a bastion of conservatism, especially one which defends unjust privileges.”

(Ah, but bastions of unjust privileges are precisely what pirates are ALL about, and specialize in, disguising their usurped gold. Good luck with that 1, Reinhold! You just may be too genteel.)

The bastion @Davos.

[Pirate Constitutional Law = Nazi bastion/bunker = WWW = 333°]

Weird Math

Rob Rob
Rob Rob
Jul 17, 2022 2:08 AM
Reply to  STARR

But I recently realized that in a fight against these legal morons, we must take their own system and shove it up their asses and make them look like hipocrites to the public.

only then, they will rule in our favor out of fear of the masses

Veri Tas
Veri Tas
Jul 14, 2022 10:33 PM

If the verdict is “constitutionally illiterate” how can it become law? And aren’t there actual laws against police brutality while a person is in their custody? Has the law of presumed innocence been changed?

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jul 15, 2022 5:25 PM
Reply to  Veri Tas

That’s all for show, if they don’t go off on you, consider yourself lucky. Mostly such things are covered up, if you dig the data.

Mike
Mike
Jul 14, 2022 9:56 PM

Roughly 10% drop in women giving birth in England for Feb 2022.
“This is the July chart. It is EXACTLY the same as the June chart. In other words – they stopped updating the data – and we know what it means when they stop reporting data.”
https://justguy.substack.com/p/uk-showing-slowing-birth-rate-as

jiin
jiin
Jul 15, 2022 3:27 AM
Reply to  Mike

Roughly 10% drop in women giving birth in England for Feb 2022.

Under Conservative fake rule for 12 year and that is the inversion.

TomUSA
TomUSA
Jul 14, 2022 9:15 PM

I’ve been across the spectrum on this one since being threatened with getting shot were I to run, barefoot and 18 at the time by a psychopathic cop in the woods with no witnesses over some marijuana I’d picked from my ” secret ” plot nearby – in other words, he felt free to kill me and simply say I ran when asked. Half a century later I see that actual police protection is hard to find, as they’re damned if they do their job and damned if they don’t, more so the former. I’m also seeing people who’ve never carried a gun getting them and learning how to use them.
As for Miranda, this was perhaps the first of many ” cuts ” against the police which made their job more challenging. The violence against citizens described here is of course criminal and now we have the double jeopardy of both crippled law enforcement and corrupt judiciary.
Here in the ‘States we are running on the common decency of folks; thank God it prevails generally as little else remains.

Thomas Frey
Thomas Frey
Jul 15, 2022 3:32 PM
Reply to  TomUSA

What parts of Qualified Immunity, Civil Asset Forfeiture, Pocket Warrants, No Knock Raids, and the political clout of Police Unions make it too hard for armed government low IQ knuckle dragging road pirate thugs from doing their job of collecting revenue for the political prarasites?

How many LEOs were sent to prison for the murder of Randy Weaver’s son, friend and wife at Ruby Ridge? Their BS charges against him were dropped because they didn’t have the evidence. So then what was the justification for the surveillance and assault of his property?

How many LEOs went to prison for the murder of the people at WACO, including children?

Anyone that thinks LEOs are handicapped has their head up their bum.

Rob Rob
Rob Rob
Jul 17, 2022 2:11 AM
Reply to  TomUSA

Crippled? Have you seen any police videos?

seriously dude, you need to get a fucking clue

bleak
bleak
Jul 14, 2022 8:13 PM

It’s been 11 years and eight days since cops beat a white indigent man, Kelly Thomas, to death. Two cops (Manuel Ramos and Jay Cicinelli) were “tried” and found not guilty. Charges were subsequently dropped on a third. “I can’t breathe” didn’t originate with George Floyd.

The surveillance video of the beating is still available on shittube. I watched it all the way through once back in 2012. That would be the last time. That’s how gruesome it is.

Raw video: Kelly Thomas police beating
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KU0Imk2Bstg

So really cops in the US have gotten away with not only murder, but torture and murder, for a long time. Now it’s “legal.”

Jury Finds Ex-Officers Accused in Kelly Thomas Death Not Guilty
https://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/national-international/former-fullerton-officers-manuel-ramos-found-by-jury-in-kelly-thomas-trial/76341/

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jul 14, 2022 9:04 PM
Reply to  bleak

Well, it’s been 10 years and 118 days since OCSD (Orange Co. Ca) sheriff deputies put me in a chokehold and tore off my left biceps tendon, for my scandalous behaviour, circulating a petition to shut down SONGS (San Onofre Nuclear Generator Station) on “my own nickel”. Afterwards, bleeding enough inside my arm, purple/yeliow/green for months, they hauled me in. and inside the belly of the beast applied a number of gnarly psyops on my behalf, à la Abu Graibh Lite (psych warfare, some rather rude, but nothing physical) and let me go at dawn the next morning. Whereupon I went back to my point of departure to reclaim my car, thankfully still there, alone in an empty mall parking kot, and moved two blocks away to a health food store where they knew and befriended me. And I picked up where we had left off. petitioning to shut down San Onofre, a battle we won not too many moons later (the skinny was that it had had a leak comparable to Fukushima, per the same TEPCO analysts, still in harness that came out here so it became a matter of some global importance, China Syndrome gone live in our own backyard; no doubt the magnitude of the calamity had a lit to do with all remaining reactors here being decommissioned not long after).

OCSD deputies, both in uniform and undercover. blanketed the parking lot throughout the day. monitoring my continued activities. I took the copy of the arrest papers for that month and went to court a month later to appear there, as ordered, only to find all evidence of my arrest had vanished. not only from court computers. but everywhere else.

If the police in USA Inc want to make a statement and send a message, they are ALL under the aegis of the CIA, and take their orders from them. and sundry shadowy affiliates, overlords.

That’s just how it is, and God knows that it is that.

Many things are weighed in the balance. more or less, such as the deep state of convenience, but I don’t think “rights” trump extra-judicial state prejudice, whenever it chooses to act on it.

Not for 20 years since the Patriot Act. If ever.

I suspect that all this supreme judicial “mise au point juridique” is largely a dog and pony show, though they have to pay some credence to the architecture of case law and cohesion, whenever such courts as we have now can’t torture them to their political tastes.

I guess it just gets worse and worse until there is some epic sea change. It has gone steadily downward, but for some scraps from the table of brute oower, making you question if you even want those.

But mirandize? They have had for years a lot of ways around that, alas. The murder of poor Kelly, by the way, happened a stone’s throw from me. I survived, but the day is young.

I thank God EITHER way.

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jul 14, 2022 9:30 PM
Reply to  John Ervin

SIGNIFICANT CASE FACTS AND RE-EDIT (including my exchanges with Ray mcGovern & Carl Douglass, of Johnnie Cochran’s team, plus ACLU snub etc) OF LAST HALF OF ABOVE COMMENT (EDIT FUNCTION TIMED OUT, I HATE WHEN THAT HAPPENS)

Well, it’s been 10 years and 118 days since OCSD (Orange Co. Ca) sheriff deputies put me in a chokehold and tore off my left biceps tendon, for my scandalous behaviour, circulating a petition publicly to shut down SONGS (San Onofre Nuclear Generator Station) on “my own nickel”. Afterwards, bleeding enough inside my arm, purple/yeliow/green for months, they hauled me in, and inside the belly of the beast applied a number of gnarly psyops on my behalf, à la Abu Graibh Lite (psych warfare, some rather rude, or worse, but nothing physical) and let me go at dawn the next morning. Whereupon I went back by freeway bullet bus to my point of departure to reclaim my car, thankfully still there, alone in an empty mall parking lot, and moved down two blocks away to a health food store where they knew me well and befriended me. And then I picked up where we had left off. petitioning to shut down San Onofre, a battle we won not too many moons later (the skinny was that it had had a leak comparable to Fukushima, per the same TEPCO Japanese analysts, still in harness there, who moonlighted and came out here, so it became a matter of some real global importance, “China Syndrome” gone live, enough!, in our own backyard; no doubt the magnitude of the calamity had a lit to do with all remaining reactors here being decommissioned not long after).

OCSD deputies, both in uniform and undercover. blanketed the parking lot throughout the day. monitoring my continued activities. I took the copy of the arrest papers for that month and went to court a month later to appear there, as ordered, only to find all evidence of my arrest had vanished. not only from court computers. but everywhere else.

I contacted Union lawyers (thru mine. AFM) and found myself unbeknownst getting rerouted by all kinds of Intel contacts to CIA assets, sucker-punched, a crash course on the State of the Spy, a valuable education, though not exactly what I was looking for. I even got the idea that the ACLU was cautioned to drop me, evident from the thermometer of their first warm response going cold. I posted a note at a comment column to Ray McGovern, and was surprised to get a response by “return email” within a few minutes, thanking me for my “continuing courage”. But all that followed in legal circles and referrals was shocking misdirection, disinformation, and deception. All spooked up and with the fingerprints of intelligence from A to Z. Except for Carl Douglass, who spoke to me at length, and who I didn’t know. having been referred by .y call from the AFM union list, had been a key attorney on OJ’s team, with Johnnie Cochran. He spoke at length, asked me to feel free to call him back, but explained “As an attorney of color, OC is just still way too conservative for me ever to take a case down there.”

The OC is the nadir that way, for most issues, like this, but overall, if the police in USA Inc, and I would think globally now, want to make a statement and send a message, they are ALL under the aegis of the CIA, and take their orders from them. and sundry shadowy affiliates, overlords.

That’s just how it is, and God knows that it is that.

Many things are weighed in the balance. more or less, such as the deep state of convenience, but I don’t think “rights” or any amendments trump extra-judicial state prejudice, whenever it chooses to act on it. Excessive force is never the exception, when chosen thoughtfully.

Not for 20 years since the Patriot Act. If ever. But it has definitely seen lighter days.

I suspect that all this supreme judicial “mise au point juridique” is largely a dog and pony show, though they have to pay some credence to the solidity of architecture of case law and cohesion, whenever such courts as we have now can’t torture all that to their political tastes.

I guess it just gets worse and worse until there is some epic sea change. It has gone steadily downward, but for some scraps from the table of brute power, making you question if you even want those.

But mirandize? They have had for years a lot of ways around that, alas. The murder of poor Kelly, by the way, happened a stone’s throw from me. I survived, but the day is young.

I thank God EITHER way.

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jul 14, 2022 10:16 PM
Reply to  John Ervin

There were many more interesting facts and contacts at the time, I posted some at opednews btl to a Ray McGovern essay, still there on the comment thread, in late May of 2012, 2 months after the OCSD assault against me, as well as a year after a local PD officer nearby had killed Kelly Thomas, and about a year after McGovern himself had been beaten up by guards at a Hillary presser for standing up in a VFW tshirt and turning his back to her.

McGovern answered me moments later, at midnight, no less, but by all signs, Intel soon moved to scuttle my case in the following weeks, considering that 2B an option preferable to the black eye of media exposure, among other reasons (such as my father JWE of ecjlaw com having been murdered almost exactly 30 years before, right before he could sign off on two anti-nuclear films he had produced for the U.N., so that is 1 serendipity that just may show that God really IS in the facts, as Bonhoeffer wrote from a Gestapo prison in Berlin, almost 70 years prior).

I was going to just gracefully edit them in to my comment above, but once again the edit function timed out.

Although I value OFFG much for SO many things, their BTL protocols and bells and whistles are far from being among favorites, by a big long shot, SO unwieldy.

I wish Administers would just make the mini-switcheroo to DISQUS, so more user-friendly and way way way way wieldier….

And they archive and organize them, too, sooo cool.

WorkingClassHero
WorkingClassHero
Jul 14, 2022 9:42 PM
Reply to  bleak

The tube link you posted asked for age verification by means of photo id or credit card. Do people really submit these documents to watch stuff on the internet now? Im lost for words.

bleak
bleak
Jul 15, 2022 1:33 AM

Do people on Off-Guardian still not know how to download youtube videos without visiting youtube.com? Even with age-verification? Which I just did, btw. There are probably half a dozen ways at least. Here’s one freetubeapp dot io you’re welcome.

Veri Tas
Veri Tas
Jul 14, 2022 10:40 PM
Reply to  bleak

Well, I was never under the illusion that the police was there to “protect and serve” the people… They’re there to protect and serve the government and the corporations.
The kind of people who are driven to join “the force” are (largely but not all) the type of petty and meanspirited ‘Hitler’s Little Helper’ types who thrive on the power invested in them, for they have very little else to show for themselves in life.

Thomas Frey
Thomas Frey
Jul 15, 2022 3:40 PM
Reply to  bleak

The moral of your story and responses below is to get out of the big cities and the most tyrannical states. The time of reconning is coming.

Howard
Howard
Jul 14, 2022 7:23 PM

This is at once off-topic yet very much on-topic. Though the Shinzo Abe assassination was noted a week ago, since this article points the finger squarely at the globalists, it is germane to any nation-state article.

When the Globalists Crossed the Rubicon: The Assassination of Shinzo Abe – Global ResearchGlobal Research – Centre for Research on Globalization

Reachable Spike
Reachable Spike
Jul 14, 2022 4:58 PM

Another hyperbolic article from the Whiteheads. Whatever abuses are being perpetrated by police, it is being done for the career benefit of the officers themselves or the financial benefit of the local forces. It is not being done for the State.

Actually, at this point the police are so harassed that they can hardly do their job. It largely balances out the militarization.

Recall also how the Chicago police union was adamant that there would be no vaccine mandate. So it works both ways.

wardropper
wardropper
Jul 14, 2022 5:26 PM

As you imply, chaos is the goal.

George Mc
George Mc
Jul 14, 2022 6:59 PM

So nothing to worry about there then.

Reachable Spike
Reachable Spike
Jul 14, 2022 7:19 PM
Reply to  George Mc

No, there is much to be concerned about. It’s just that it’s more multifarious than how the Whiteheads present it.

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jul 19, 2022 1:07 AM

Reachable, you wrote: “Whatever abuses are being perpetrated by police, it is being done for the career benefit of the officers themselves or the financial benefit of the local forces. It is not being done for the State.”

That’s only partly true, if that. A huge contingent of PD are moonlighting for CIA. That has been steadily increasing over the years, in fact there is parallel training.

And it’s an established fact that before the 2004 “elections” the entire country’s police went online to a single shared database. Not everyone sees all the same info, but it’s all interlinked.

So the most hyperbolic, or rather hypobolic, statement of all is that none of this is done for the State. That’s ridiculous, the State has a dog in every hunt. And some individuals are under Virtual House Arrest wherever they wander.

In fact, during and since the Lockdowns we all are (or, rather, more so).

That card is simply played very close to the vest.

It is not a bug but a feature of state-monitored Mind Control to have citizens dismiss this notion into the murk of denialism.

A Woodhull
A Woodhull
Jul 14, 2022 4:37 PM

“and that anything they say and do can and will be used against them in a court of law.” – It has always annoyed me that the officer can apparently predict that something an alleged perp has to say WILL be used against them in court. How can they possibly know?

The warning used in the UK makes more sense. – You do not have to say anything but anything you do say will be taken down and may be given in evidence.

wardropper
wardropper
Jul 14, 2022 5:28 PM
Reply to  A Woodhull

I suppose the officer is dimly aware that anything an alleged perp has to say WILL be used by the prosecution, because it is their job to make sure that anything potentially incriminating can be guaranteed to come to light…

Martin Usher
Martin Usher
Jul 14, 2022 5:45 PM
Reply to  A Woodhull

Its just a form of speech. The British government has made a good effort to bring its official documentation into the 21st century while a lot of American documentation, especially at the Federal level, is arcane — which I’d guess because of our (American) custom of dissecting words rather than focusing on meaning.

Both statements tell people what they should know already — if you’re being interviewed by the police as part of an investigation then you would be well advised to say as little as possible, preferably nothing. This goes against our impulse to be helpful as citizens but legal experience has shown that these people might be friendly but they are not your friend, their job is to get results and if you’re in the frame then you need to be super careful. (Obviously this wouldn’t apply if you’re just a witness that’s clearly not involved except as onlooker or victim but even then some care is necessary — “just the facts”, don’t volunteer extraneous information, stick to the point and just answer questions.)

Art Costa
Art Costa
Jul 14, 2022 4:33 PM

These are privileges not rights. If they’re rights that can’t be given or taken away. The police are state militia there to protect the property privileges of the of the wealthy.

Mia
Mia
Jul 15, 2022 1:05 AM
Reply to  Art Costa

They’re not ‘privileges’. They want you to think your rights are at their prerogative. Don’t be their tool. The government doesn’t OWN anyone, and they aren’t our ‘rulers’ bestowing ‘privileges’, or withholding them according to their pleasure.

Art Costa
Art Costa
Jul 15, 2022 1:44 AM
Reply to  Mia

Only privileges can be taken away. Natural rights do not require a mutable laws. You are born with them and cannot give them nor have them taken away. Once you acquiesce to the notion they can, you’re simply a slave.

Rob Rob
Rob Rob
Jul 17, 2022 2:15 AM
Reply to  Mia

If you own pets or farm animals, do they have rights or do you think that you can pick and choose? That’s what these assholes think of us, like you do of your animals

tom
tom
Jul 14, 2022 4:28 PM

the popo are a local military force.
not their job to protect the living, only the dead [CORPorations]
The living may rely on Jesus; while corporations Need santa[sp?]-controlled police state. 
Zombies have no wants, rather just one Need, to suck the life out of the living. 
And they are presently getting quite fat.

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jul 15, 2022 5:47 PM
Reply to  tom

Here in the OC I have long had the sense, if not forever, that most PD, not universally but by weight, weightily, is an “Army of Occupation” meant to pin and hold, especially the sheriff’s office, OCSD, who made me feel their Intel presence with gusto, 10 years ago. Philip K. Dick, so canny, who lived here not far away in his last years before a massive stroke took him in his ‘fifties, took aim at OCSD in the remarkable, poignant, and culturally trenchant sci-fi dystopian thriller about pandemic drug slavery of the future, “A Scanner Darkly”. Wow, with a young Keaunu “Neo” Reeves and Winona Rider, it was less sci-fi than prescient vision, in its essence, more than any details. Check it out.

OCSD had got in my face often enough before their 2012 assault noted on this thread, but even at its worst it was mostly less than what the Mexican community here has to go through as a whole. In LA the Spanish-speaking community is rife with gangs, but more forward looking as “La Raza’, but down here one gets the idea that all of the culture puts on more conservative airs, as the message is pretty clear that one knows one’s place, and uppitiness is not expressed.

Mucho
Mucho
Jul 14, 2022 3:25 PM

Very interesting interview with former Freemasonic US cop. References Rothschild quite a bit, talks about the Satanic rituals they do, seems legit.

About Masonic Cops And Or Cops That Are Free Masons
https://www.bitchute.com/video/LttfhMPvqfcj/

“The very word “secrecy” is repugnant in a free and open society; and we are as a people inherently and historically opposed to secret societies, to secret oaths and to secret proceedings…Our way of life is under attack. Those who make themselves our enemy are advancing around the globe…no war ever posed a greater threat to our security. If you are awaiting a finding of “clear and present danger,” then I can only say that the danger has never been more clear and its presence has never been more imminent…For we are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy that relies primarily on covert means for expanding its sphere of influence–on infiltration instead of invasion, on subversion instead of elections, on intimidation instead of free choice, on guerrillas by night instead of armies by day. It is a system which has conscripted vast human and material resources into the building of a tightly knit, highly efficient machine that combines military, diplomatic, intelligence, economic, scientific and political operations. Its preparations are concealed, not published. Its mistakes are buried, not headlined. Its dissenters are silenced, not praised. No expenditure is questioned, no rumor is printed, no secret is revealed.”

― President John F. Kennedy

Observe
Observe
Jul 14, 2022 3:20 PM

‘In totality, the rights enshrined in the Fifth Amendment speak to the Founders’ determination to protect the rights of the individual against a government with a natural inclination towards corruption, tyranny and thuggery.

The Founders were especially concerned with balancing the scales of justice in such a way that the innocent and the accused were not railroaded and browbeaten by government agents into coerced confessions, false convictions, or sham trials.

Indeed, so determined were the Founders to safeguard the rights of the innocent…’

Genuine question on the ‘Founders’: Do sceptics here, including OffG, really believe that all those long years ago we had a lovely bunch who just really cared about the ordinary folk and truly wanted to protect and ensure their rights against tyranny? That over the last couple hundred years or so it’s just been bad people messing up what those good people tried to set in motion?

I’m not having it!

Lizzyh7
Lizzyh7
Jul 14, 2022 8:05 PM
Reply to  Observe

I don’t think so, from what I see out here most people know the founders were wealthy men who wanted to preserve their wealth and rights. That doesn’t negate in totality the Declaration of Independence or the Constitution and Bill of Rights, but as most of us know it means the US has never really ever lived up to what those documents proscribed. America has NEVER been the country it pretends to be, but perhaps it could if we took those documents seriously, which never really happened of course.

Does that mean we should throw it all out and start over? And how would that be done, and who would do it? That’s the rub. While we talk a bit about some type of revolution here, and eliminating the psychopaths who own us, the devil is in the details of just how, and who, would really be able to accomplish that. In the meantime, if we are to at the very least attempt to hold these sick bastards to the law, then watching them ignore those flawed documents the founders put forward in silence isn’t the answer either. It’s the only thing we have to hold them to at this point, and as you point out, it ain’t much.

Pilgrim Shadow
Pilgrim Shadow
Jul 15, 2022 2:03 PM
Reply to  Lizzyh7

 “. . .then watching them ignore those flawed documents the founders put forward . . .”

I think the documents are pretty sound, and the ideals within them noble and honest in intent. It’s human nature that’s flawed. “The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak.”

Rob Rob
Rob Rob
Jul 17, 2022 2:19 AM
Reply to  Lizzyh7

Yeah, fuck the legal manipulators with their own scripture…

they wrote a huge pile of bullshit claiming to care about human rights and we got it to push back against these psychopaths… Their spiritual ancestors fucked up

SeamusPadraig
SeamusPadraig
Jul 14, 2022 2:41 PM

Well, a bit of perspective: unlike the 5th Amendment itself, the Miranda warning is not in the constitution. As the article makes clear, it was yet another Warren-Court special. If you nevertheless believe (as I do) that the warning was a good idea, then the thing to do is to have the states codify it into statutory law. We really need to get away from this practice of having unelected judges rewrite the constitution whenever they want, and return power to the electorate.

Albert Anderson
Albert Anderson
Jul 14, 2022 2:11 PM

What I find interesting from the basic ideology of the right, conservatives, and libertarians regarding freedom and liberty and constitutional rights and all that is they are the most vocal calling for more police power and more pigs. They deride some of the delusional left who want to “defund the police” (although that appears to be a divide and conquer construct, which works), make fun of big “liberal” cities like Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, etc., relative to the supposed squalor created by loosening laws and cutting back on the police state, etc. So, they ask for more please, while screaming that their rights are being taken away by the politicians and global dictators. Not realizing they’re only asking for more power for those same politicians and global fascists because in the end, the pigs are their enforcers.

There’s an old joke about a “Happy Medium”, which I won’t get into, but it’s something we may never find.

Tom Larsen
Tom Larsen
Jul 15, 2022 2:38 PM

The problem is the duopoly. People on the right, just like on the left don’t realize that they are just as manipulated by the same capitalist ruling class

Freecus
Freecus
Jul 14, 2022 1:49 PM

Whitehead, as a BAR attorney, never addresses the fact that the ‘Government of the United States’ can be found as a Corporation with a simple search on Dun&Bradstreet.
US Citizens & Persons take on a completely different meaning when under the jurisdiction of the Uniform Commercial Code.
Some say this ‘conversion’ occurred during the Emergency Banking Act of March 1933 as a way to secure Central Banks loans, collateral was required.
Natural Men & Women think they’re on the land, but are instead floating in the Sea of Commerce, identifying as ‘Legal Fictions’ under the UCC provides tacit consent.
This system of secured loans with interest, is in the process of being digitally upgraded as the debt levels had over time, become unmanageable.
Currency becomes CBDC tokens, the Metaverse provides a real-time digital simulation of the Internet of Things, all run by SMART contracts instead of Lawful governments & courts.
Whitehead is no doubt well intentioned but does not comprehend what is actually occurring, not just in America but with all UN and BIS members.
We do not consent.

Martin Usher
Martin Usher
Jul 14, 2022 5:55 PM
Reply to  Freecus

The US Constitution reads like the incorporation documents of a late 18th century joint stock company with great attention paid to how officers of the corporation would be selected, how they’d serve and how long their terms were. The goals of the corporation are spelled out in the document. There is no mention of individual rights which is why the Bill of Rights, an entirely separate document (which we casually think of part of the Constitution) was needed. Its very much an afterthought.

Using this model makes sense since the Founders would have been familiar with it, it being widely used in the English speaking world. Corporation had already acted as de-facto governments — the East India Company being the most obvious example, being not just a de-facto government but a de-facto empire operating under license from the British Crown. (Truly a trailblazer, hundreds of years ahead of its time!)

Freecus
Freecus
Jul 14, 2022 1:45 PM

Whitehead, as a BAR attorney, never addresses the fact that the ‘Government of the United States’ can be found as a Corporation with a simple search on Dun&Bradstreet.
US Citizens & Persons take on a completely different meaning when under the jurisdiction of the Uniform Commercial Code.
Some say this ‘conversion’ occurred during the Emergency Banking Act of March 1933 as a way to secure Central Banks loans, collateral was required.
Natural Men & Women think they’re on the land, but are instead floating in the Sea of Commerce, identifying as ‘Legal Fictions’ under the UCC provides tacit consent.
This system of secured loans with interest, is in the process of being digitally upgraded as the debt levels had over time, become unmanageable.
Currency becomes CBDC tokens, the Metaverse provides a real-time digital simulation of the Internet of Things, all run by SMART contracts instead of Lawful governments & courts.
Whitehead is no doubt well intentioned but does not comprehend what is actually occurring, not just in America but with all UN and BIS members.
We do not consent.

Rob Rob
Rob Rob
Jul 14, 2022 12:59 PM

Blaming the unions is like blaming big pharma for the FDA selling out.

the government allowed for this corruption by claiming it was due to lobbying but points the finger at unions as the cause…

my union can barely get shit, but yet my company wants us to give back things every time we go to contact negotiations…

how come the police unions get the right to push for more rights, while other unions are losing,?

because that is the plan… So it’s not the unions, but the politics that allow for these fucked up laws.

Rob Rob
Rob Rob
Jul 14, 2022 1:08 PM
Reply to  Rob Rob

Also, when police do indeed break the law and aren’t shielded, somehow the courts tend to side with them. But the newspapers and media will say that the officer got protected by the union. It’s like the right crying about antifa doing bad things, but they aren’t prosecuting the perps, instead they use it to let the behavior happen in order to further a political agenda.

all these laws and they pick and choose what not to follow, just to fuck the innocent and protect the criminals

SigmaOK
SigmaOK
Jul 14, 2022 12:51 PM

I’m wondering if this one is similar to Roe v Wade in that the real message being sent (by the court) is if you continue to deride and “defund the police” then we have to compensate for the inevitable mistakes that will be made.

With the US’s constant slide, I think they should just dismiss with all intermediary steps and replace every stations worth of officers with one of these two options:

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wardropper
wardropper
Jul 14, 2022 12:38 PM

Just call it the Sub-Human Court, and we might get somewhere.

Howard
Howard
Jul 14, 2022 12:35 PM

I’ve been saying this for as long as I can remember: as long as people continue venerating the police and military, these segments of society will continue violating people’s rights.

And as long as it only happens to “those others,” then the good upstanding God-fearing folks next door will continue turning a blind eye when it happens.

Until those chickens come home to roost in the backyards of the “If you’ve done nothing wrong you have nothing to fear” crowd, nothing will change. The Constitution will continue being shredded.

Bottom line: there is no fault in society that cannot be laid at the foot of the people themselves.

Veri Tas
Veri Tas
Jul 14, 2022 10:50 PM
Reply to  Howard

Nothing to fear if you’ve done nothing wrong.
Tell that to the elderly woman who was downed by the Australian police during a demonstration against lockdowns, masks and forced C vaxxes (in the State of Victoria) and who was then peppersprayed directly in the face while down.

Binra
Binra
Jul 14, 2022 12:29 PM

The legal recognition of the right to remain silent is a state recognition of such a right. The right is yours to live and accept your consequences.
Discernment of true context is key.
The mind can be tricked, and tricked minds can be tooled to operate against true interests by asserting and imposing a false or masking over of attempt to distort true interests so as to save a private agenda set in fear and division.

Give unto Caesar what is due unto Caesar and give unto God what is due unto God.
The tricked mind makes ‘god’ of power in a world of conflict and division.
God – taken in vanity will be an image of our own making. But this image has only the life WE give it – such as to reveal itself an idol of a phished mind.

Law of life is upstream to any capacity of mind to effect and so cannot BE broken.
The rules and filters of a conditioned mind set and hold the conditions for the world that we made – as overlay to what truly or simply Is. Caesar can be interpreted as the illusion of power in minds & world set in division and conflict, but there is a place for holding order within a current state of perceived chaos as the conditions in which to ask and receive answer or guidance as to what the true needs are and serving their fulfilment.
The laws of man are not the law of love, but hold stepping stones toward the opening of a direct recognition of another as your self, for at the most intimate level of our being, an attack on our Self had to result in the denial and projection of the denied – both victim and victimiser.

I haven’t read the article. I see what is being taken to its tipping point. the ‘victory’ of the ego is of death over life, but what we are is upstream or prior to what we make of it in love or fear and division set as if a bodily autonomy controlled by a feared and yet asserted ‘separation’ from life – that if true could not Be.

Mercenaries, mind-controlled or trained thugs are surely set to replace a professional force both incrementally by cultural undermining, and suddenly by the import or recruitment & training of those without bonds of allegiance to the people or nation as a culturally living spirit.

To recognise value or worth and embody or give witness to it opens alignment with others who also resonate and recognise worthiness. This is a creative and largely unselfconscious attribute or our being that we have to relearn, as a result of having learned to mask in symbolic and ideological derivatives of such direct intimacies of being.
To be lost or trapped within a masking reality can be set as a world of lies at war with truth, but only a split allegiance can project its own division out and WANT to believe it real as a means to mitigate or manage fear or pain of loss that accompanies self-doubt of being, such as to assert atempts at making a mind of dissociation ‘certain’.

Relationship IS Commuication, with or without words. Declining a false offer to contract in weaponised FORMS of communication may be itself take many forms. One of which is to hear nonsense as nonsense. But if anything real is offered or invited, let it be honoured for that, regardless the complex of masking defences set against it.

How is this different from holding unified and clear purpose amidst apparent chaos such as to navigate and serve the whole situation? The attempt to predictive control seeks the ‘intelligence’ by which to forfend or mitigate its own fear of destruction, but it costs too much when there is no time to think. While that cost is masked over by the indulgence of thinking we have all the time in the world…

Wisenox
Wisenox
Jul 14, 2022 11:41 AM

If people are wondering where monkeypox is coming from, this coronavirus patent from 2015 explains it:
https://patents.google.com/patent/EP3172319B1/en

They use Vaccinia Virus (smallpox) as a vehicle.

Rob Rob
Rob Rob
Jul 14, 2022 1:10 PM
Reply to  Wisenox

No, monkeypox is from toxicity of the vaccines. They use it as a cover story.

just like polio which was caused by pesticides, gets blamed on a virus

Peter Moritz
Peter Moritz
Jul 14, 2022 6:56 PM
Reply to  Rob Rob

If polio was caused by pesticides, why would a vaccine (Salk) against the virus stop polio when pesticide use has actually increased since that time? Your logic seems deficient. Also, polio is a disease known at least since around 1500BC.

Monkeypox also has been known since about 1958. It is related to smallpox, another virus infection known for several millennia in, its origin in China.

I have worked in laboratories with bacteria and some viruses, testing antibiotics, so I do from my personal experience give no credence to those proclaiming that microorganisms cannot be the cause of diseases in other biological organisms.

If you infect a healthy standardized lab rat with a certain bacteria and the symptoms match what had been described as being the result of such infection in hundreds of thousands or more cases, be it in animal or human, and the causal agent can be isolated and grown in a medium, I see no reason to doubt the theory.

Binra
Binra
Jul 15, 2022 10:47 PM
Reply to  Peter Moritz

Polio was a new name for various palsies/paralysis – it was not one thing caused by one thing (virus) That had specific clusters relative to biocides in agriculture. The vaccine didn’t stop polio, but the definitions and means of diagnosis were adjusted so that statistically the figures under the name ‘polio’ reduced to zero in pharmaceutically developed countries.
You are deeply trained to think in terms that cannot see otherwise. This is presumed to be the science…
The evidences for micro organisms as the cause of disease is fullo f anomolay and contradiction. However we know that bacterial excreta can be endo-toxic – for example. that doesn’t make them the cause of a population imbalance or lack of ability to eliminate or neutralise toxicity.

Monkey pox – so called – coined by those giving multiple ‘smallpox’ vaccines to lab monkeys in which a few showed such symptoms as to give a diversion for the ‘smallpox’ being caused by its own ‘vaccines’.

The ‘infections’ in lab animals are almost always injected directly into sensitive organs to generate a disease response that is not the specific clinical symptomology of the defined disease – but declared evidence of ‘infection’. Just as cytopathic effect in vitro cultured specifically selected cell cultures subjected to various toxins and starved before adding indeterminate ‘stuff’ is assumed to prove and ‘isolate’ the virus as a product to use in vaccines or research such as yours.

You want no reason to question your Theos!
Neurotoxic substances have been around for a long time.
Virus once meant a toxin.
Now its a demonic hijacker in a scientific pantheon.

Contagion is observable via Media, by suggestion and by mimicry.
Mass exposure to shocks, stresses and toxins generates similar disease conditions. What would you expect to ‘catch’ from chemtrail aerosols, diesel fumes or Wuhan smog?

Peter Moritz
Peter Moritz
Jul 16, 2022 9:48 AM
Reply to  Binra

The ‘infections’ in lab animals are almost always injected directly into sensitive organs to generate a disease response that is not the specific clinical symptomology of the defined disease-

Not in my time. Either by injection subcutaneously or orally. The rest of your post is a collection of claims void of any evidence. Not worth bothering with.

mgeo
mgeo
Jul 15, 2022 8:14 AM
Reply to  Wisenox

That is just the vehicle. The spike and other stuff in the jab
(a) may get to any part of the body
(b) may cause direct damage, lowered immunity or DNA change
(c) has produced a wide variety of illness and injury, including serious and fatal sorts.

Binra
Binra
Jul 15, 2022 11:04 PM
Reply to  mgeo

I note the spiked agenda works on many levels but especially as narratives that gain traction in the imagination of the pharmaceutically trained ‘medical model’.
Yes to stuff – whatever is in the shots is supposed to hack into your cells to instruct them to make the ‘spike’ protein’ as the trigger to make antibodies so as to have more ‘defences’ triggered when something with a similar profile is encountered in the course of functional adaptive living.
It seems to me that we are vain and love to think we ‘know’ so as to herd into bubble realities that are then completely ruled by their core beliefs.

I’m not arguing against the gist of what you post so much as the narratives that frame it.
There can also be also a psychic-emotional shocks relating to violations, self-disgust or ‘dirtied’, associations of impotence or powerlessness and inadequacy in taking under coercion – allof which may be heavily masked over as if to shut them out. But of course they are no less active for being denied – and then the Media is persisting a persecution of these people by all the horrors assigned to their genetics, to all the side effects – such as to generate a pan-demonium of fears on top of the fear of viruses or of losing social acceptances and inclusions.

The mind is very powerful and never sleeps. What we think is our mind is the capacity to make that seem an inconceivable statement. For the body is so frail and easily broken and ‘killed’. THAT is how powerful the mind is. But power given to external agencies will seem to be our subjection, not our decision – or habit of an old choice set under conflict running subconsciously.

susan mullen
susan mullen
Jul 14, 2022 11:28 AM

I think the Supreme Court died when they failed to produce the leaker.

SeamusPadraig
SeamusPadraig
Jul 14, 2022 2:49 PM
Reply to  susan mullen

We can easily narrow it down to the staff of one of the three Democrats on the court.

S Cooper
S Cooper
Jul 14, 2022 10:46 AM

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S Cooper
S Cooper
Jul 14, 2022 10:48 AM
Reply to  S Cooper

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S Cooper
S Cooper
Jul 14, 2022 10:49 AM
Reply to  S Cooper

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Wisenox
Wisenox
Jul 14, 2022 10:37 AM

When laws and rights become mutable, so should your willingness to follow them.

eman
eman
Jul 14, 2022 2:32 PM
Reply to  Wisenox

the problem is when victims of unconstitutional treatment under the law receive no support from those who are at the moment not affected by the victim’s circumstance, <=the rights abused victim is rendered helpless. IOWs, unless the entire community comes forth to help the victim to defend his or her rights, there is no defense open to the victim. Until this ruling, courts could at least protect the victim by cease and desist orders and by releasing criminals whose rights were abused.

There is in the 5th amendment (of the 10 amendment bill of rights) the duty imposed on government, by the 5th amendment, which denies government authority to compel a person to bear witness against him or her self.

government both makes the rules and enforces the rules. because there is minimal provision in the constitution for the people to defend themselves against tyranny.

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jul 15, 2022 5:54 PM
Reply to  Wisenox

Well, enforceability is the fulcrum.

Rhys Jaggar
Rhys Jaggar
Jul 14, 2022 9:51 AM

Americans finally realising that they are NOT the ‘Greatest Democracy in the World’ shock….

mgeo
mgeo
Jul 15, 2022 8:19 AM
Reply to  Rhys Jaggar

Or the richest. Or the most militarily powerful. Or the most admired..

Paul Watson
Paul Watson
Jul 14, 2022 9:33 AM

Nothing Supreme about that court.
Lost all credibility after the Biden steal.
Now it’s all bought and paid for either by money or comprimising photos at Epstein Island…

Edwige
Edwige
Jul 14, 2022 10:07 AM
Reply to  Paul Watson

“Lost all credibility after the Biden steal.”

You mean it still had credibilty after Roe? Again, this isn’t about the merits or not of abortion – it’s about where the decision should be made. Even SCJs pro-choice admitted the legal reasoning in Roe was woeful.

The Miranda ruling (which incidentally was one of the things that gets Clint angry in DIRTY HARRY – it’s specifically mentioned) was a Warren Court ruling. Earl Warren was Grand Master of California Freemasonry and presided over the JFK whitewash.

Paul Watson
Paul Watson
Jul 14, 2022 11:57 AM
Reply to  Edwige

Roe was about creating more division.
and or “my body my choice” for future Covid jabs.
If you think these people care about the unborn you are deluded.

Hele
Hele
Jul 15, 2022 6:11 AM
Reply to  Paul Watson

Roe has an outcome-whether it’s “about creating more division”-or not.It has a brutal outcome impacting women’s lives.We women don’t care who “cares about the unborn”-dems or reps: Ergo:not “deluded”.We only care about our rights and choices.

Blind Gill
Blind Gill
Jul 14, 2022 10:00 PM
Reply to  Edwige

Bohemian Grove Clint Eastwood?

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jul 15, 2022 5:56 PM
Reply to  Edwige

Yep.

John Ervin
John Ervin
Jul 19, 2022 1:17 AM
Reply to  Edwige

At what point did credibility entrench? The King’s Bench heard in 1772, mind you, the pivotal case in abolitionist history, “Somerset v. Stewart” and after months of consideration, Lord Mansfield who had heard the case as presiding judge, issued a ruling saying that nowhere in the country’s law could he find any support, at all, for the owning of a human being as a slave, or property, and “therefore I must release Somerset to his liberty” or words close to that. Then began in USAmerica a “Race to Revolution” (Gerald Horne, rather recent book about that history). Reaching a climax with the Declaration of Independence 4 years and some days later. Thus, “The Counter-Revolution of 1776.” (G. Horne) Just a tax revolt, really. Popular here.

For the next century American high courts mostly defended slavery, as a core economic interest, with endless judicial sophistries. Not much credibility, in those courts, other than in terms as a fairy tale.

Lizzyh7
Lizzyh7
Jul 14, 2022 6:25 PM
Reply to  Paul Watson

It had no more credibility after Bush v Gore as well. And I am not and never was a Gore fan either. That “election” should have cemented for all Americans that elections do not matter one damned bit. Our owners control who gets into office obviously, while they get people to scream at each other and fight over choices of candidates that are not real choices. I’d imagine it goes a lot further back than Bush v Gore, but that example alone should suffice.

Paul Watson
Paul Watson
Jul 14, 2022 8:03 PM
Reply to  Lizzyh7

Yes very true the warning signs were there.