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Report from Taiwan Reflections from my visit to Taiwan the week before its momentous election

Johan Eddebo

On January 13, this Saturday, Taiwan’s presidential and parliamentary elections are simultaneously held. There’s a lot at stake. The independence movement is facing off with Koumintang and the reunification agenda, with the former poised to really entrench its influence in a geopolitically volatile situation. The election result will tip the scales in terms of Taiwan’s approach to China and the West during the years ahead, and due to the overall political context, the outcome could make a significant impact for the world at large.

What first strikes me when I land in Taipei is how untamed everything is.

The city seems to live a defiant life of its own that planning and governance can’t really subdue. Graffiti on derelict facades and abandoned buildings somehow organically synergize with skyscrapers and science parks. Dive bars and dirty game halls, replete with these accursed claw machines that never seem to work, sit side by side with brand stores and polished public institutions. And artistic expressions appear where one least would expect it, just like these paintings and sculptures of cathedrals that are hidden away so you can’t see them from the floor. I find an impossibly detailed temple in an anonymous alley next to a scooter repair shop.

Catherine Lee, central Taipei.

The streets are tangibly dominated by minor businesses, most of them adapted to their own little niches. You can’t really find any franchises or chain stores, apart from FamilyMart (a popular Japanese kombini) or a few Starbucks here and there. Small businesses make up almost 99% of the private sector, which is extreme.

It seems to me that Taiwan’s market economy is so unregulated that the more visible giants have trouble finding a foothold. Nobody taxes the commerce on the markets or in the little restaurants where every exchange is cash-based. You basically don’t get receipts anywhere. And since the 80s, the government has intensely supported the small cap sector, especially within tech and IT, to bolster the high-technology exports that form the core of the nation’s economy. All sorts of small enterprises have gotten a great deal of leeway as a result.

But limited regulation also means that worker’s rights are relatively suppressed. The unions have really only been active since the end of martial law in the late 80s, and legislation has huge blind spots enabling sometimes extreme exploitation. As long as contracts are voluntary, almost anything goes.

And most people obviously have to work to survive. When I go down to one of these famous night markets to try out some local cuisine, business is intense. There are throngs of tourists, mostly from China, but quite a few from Japan. If you’re white or black, people tend to stare. Kids look at you as if they’ve seen a ghost.

The atmosphere is pretty special, streets are characterized by a combination of some sort of garish Asian kitsch and exaggerated Western urban aesthetics, sort of like Fritz Lang’s Metropolis. We buy fish balls from an old man. They’re like the Swedish kind, except… Tasty.

Later I find this incredible black pudding and grilled intestine in a food cart run by a sweet old lady. And these very same people are back to their same spots when I pass through again the very next day, probably without them having gotten much sleep. They’re probably not there just for fun. In Taiwan, if you haven’t been employed for a good number of years with a decent retirement plan, old age is not easy. Basic state support doesn’t even cover rent.

Central Taichung

The inadequate labour laws and social welfare are of course also related to the fact that China, Japan and the West for more than a hundred years have exploited Taiwan as some sort of industrial park for the outsourcing of key production. This in turn connects with the colonial tug-of-war held around this strategically important piece of real estate for four centuries.

Taiwan was first industrialized under Japan’s colonial dominion during the end of the 19th century with the purpose of providing the empire with foodstuff and raw material. When Taiwan later severed this relationship through US support, they basically only substitued one sovereign for another, and the West assumed the same role as Japan, making quite lucrative investments in Taiwan’s continued industrial and economic development.

The country is really one of the first modern states being utilized for neo-colonial outsourcing on a greater scale. The political situation after WWII ensured that workers could be effectively suppressed, and the work force was both competent and docile due to the established Confucian educational infrastructure established by the Japanese Empire.

Against this background, and with a nice capital influx from the World Bank, the “Taiwanese miracle” takes place, with a few decades of incredibly rapid growth and intensified specialization of the economy. And Taiwan’s role as producer of key hi-tech components is what now makes the country crucial to the contemporary geopolitical game.

Goat made from repurposed industrial scrap. Kaohsiung’s Fine Art Centre.

Almost all computer and smartphone motherboards are sourced from Taiwan. The vast majority of laptops. And practically every single one of the advanced semiconductors used in the manufacturing of state-of-the-art microchips, arguably the world’s single most important piece of technology, are manufactured by just one Taiwanese company, the TSMC.

A good bit of the current struggle between China and the West is centered on these crucial resources. China’s most important point of foreign policy has for quite some time been to secure control over Taiwan, and not only for ideological or symbolic reasons. The production of microchips is the cornerstone of all modern industrial, economic and military infrastructure, and since the United States’ trade war against China picked up speed under Trump, they’ve been pushed back quite a bit in this area. The sanctions against Huawei caused substantial problems for China’s microchip supply lines that the country is yet to recover from.

We’re in a historical moment where tensions between the West and China are greater than ever. And as most people know, overall geopolitical uncertainty is off the scale. That’s also why the colonial watermarks are particularly obvious in the run-up to the Taiwanese elections.

The nation’s politics are thoroughly nationalist, whether on the right or the “left”. At least on the surface. The major difference between the two blocs is that the liberal independence movement (the greens), bolstered by Western capital and intelligence, adhere to the notion of a separate Taiwanese identity, while the right-wing (the blue) has developed a pan-Chinese nationalism out of the framework of Koumintang’s original claims to be the rightful ruling party of all of China.

Somewhat ironically, Koumintang is now the main proponent of a conciliatory and moderate approach to China, which has complex reasons, but relates to the emergence of the pro-Western independence movement, and mainland China’s increasingly pragmatic foreign policies from the 1970s onward.

In reality, though, the current election is mostly about where to place one’s bet in the grand geopolitical game. An ex-pat Canadian academic I’m interviewing describes the situation, somewhat pessimistically, by how the Taiwanese politics is currently trying to make a decision to either bet on the collapse of China or the waning of Western influence. It’s impossible to know for sure which side to pick, and the stakes are huge.

He thinks the risk of armed conflict is negligible, since China’s long-term view is incompatible with messing up the hi-tech lines of production, and they’re neither very eager to harm a people that’s ethnically and culturally so very close.

But there are a hundred other ways to exert influence. Chris Miller, author of Chip War, argues that military pressure way below the threshold of an actual invasion could still effectively undermine the US security guarantees and force Taiwan to align itself with China. If the Chinese would move to embargo Taiwan to push the TSMC to begin supplying them with chips and semiconductors again, the US faces a severe dilemma. They cannot afford a full-scale military conflict, but doing nothing at all would send a strong signal to Taiwan, which in terms of defense is completely dependent on the US and Japan, that support cannot be expected.

The Taiwanese public is not very eager to talk politics. Especially not with some white foreigner. I shouldn’t be surprised. The memory of martial law is still fresh, and the younger generations seem adamant to not rocking the boat, and as far as possible just preserve the relative prosperity and security that has been achieved. The safe public expression of political views is definitely not taken for granted.

I remain for a while in the 228 Peace Memorial Park, a monument to the memory of the February massacre in 1947, which initiated the White Terror, the political persecutions during the almost forty years of martial law. The site is paradoxically a geniuine expression of redress and conciliation, yet still a part of the Koumintangs identity building in terms of a nationalist propaganda project.

All of this bears witness to the Taiwanese people’s complex, and sometimes fragmented self-understanding. You’re at once an independent people and a colonial subject. The rightful bearers of the Chinese civilization and rebels on the margin.

And even though people don’t seem to want to talk about it, there’s an evident undercurrent of reflection over this impossible situation and precarious identity in these repeated, autonomous artistic expressions I seem to find everywhere. In the irreverent and kitschy cityscape, where styles are mixed with reckless abandon, and the Christ and Buddha happily stand side by side. It’s not so much in the public art and architecture, which rather have this empty McMansion feel to them, but in regular people’s secret meaning-making and aesthetic reflection.

In Kaohsiung’s Fine Art Centre at the southern end of the island, this becomes particularly clear. The exhibitions in this huge public space seem rather inconsequential at first, but are in fact deeply political in quite subtle ways.

I see a Sisyphos built out of discarded paint tubes. A perpetuum mobile that pointlessly sifts the same set of soybeans, over and over again. A series of paintings showing an abandoned city slowly being retaken by wild nature.

All of this poses questions about who really controls the future of the Taiwanese people. Whether it’s to be forever condemened to supply the needs of others, without freedom to make its own way. And about what’s really the point, in the long run, of mankind’s constant bickering over who gets shot in the head and who gets the mineral rights.

The White Terror, Kaohsiung’s Fine Art Centre

According to the polls, it’s likely that the independence movement’s DPP and Lai Ching-te will take home the election, and seriously entrench their political influence. If an election victory is followed up by further US pressure towards China with the further armament of Taiwan, it’s not unlikely that we’ll see a significant backlash. Not least in relation to Russia’s relative success in the Ukraine, the consolidation of the BRICS, and the fact that the West has lost a lot of support around the world after Israel’s disastrous war against Hamas.

Most of our politicians are oblivious to Taiwan’s dilemma. For them, it’s all too simple. We need to support “freedom and democracy” by unconditionally bolstering the independence movement. But aggravating the conflict and suppressing compromise could become very costly for the Taiwanese people. The situation has more or less reduced the issue of Taiwan’s political independence to an uncertain wager over which of the geopolitical blocs it’s most safe to become subordinate to.

And in times of unprecedented tension, perhaps Taiwan’s best option really is to not rock the boat any further.

Colonial power structures produce scars that never seem to vanish.

A stray dog comes up to me on the street in Taichung. He doesn’t want anything to eat. Just to sit next to us and get petted for a while. I can see he’s been bitten in the shoulder, and the wound seems infected.

We leave him behind after a while. I try to convince myself that he’s someone else’s responsibility. Not mine.

I still feel guilty about it.

>Johan Eddebo is a philosopher and researcher based in Sweden, you can read more of his work through his Substack.

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Berlin Beerman
Berlin Beerman
Jan 26, 2024 12:15 AM

Nice photos. The dog represents the US and the West. You should have left it alone, as it will surely die. Something the Taiwanese need to do with the US – distance themselves before the infection spreads to them.

Governments of Taiwan are all basically the same. Their constitution holds the key. Problem is many in Taiwan have issues reading or understanding their constitution.

The US offers them military junk which the government then gets kickbacks on. The hell with the people.

Oh and don’t forget there were indigenous peoples on that island long before the Chinese sailed across and set up shop.

NickM
NickM
Jan 15, 2024 8:31 AM

“They’re like the Swedish kind, except… Tasty.”
Cultivated taste buds and a sharp eye add zing to this tourist’s impressions. I skipped the Big Screen Politics because they are much less permanent feature of a country than daily life in the local market and a stray dog in the park.

NickM
NickM
Jan 14, 2024 10:15 AM

Gonzalo Lira — Tribute to a U$ Martyr who Loved Ukraine and was Abandoned by a U$ Regime which Despised and Destroyed Ukraine

https://youtu.be/2X7JmoXenw0?si=r4PnVS8xfKL5sDw4

The same destructive U$ regime that flattered Ukraine and persuaded it to commit suicide is now trying the same destructive tactics on Taiwan and the Philippines:

“We shall give you all sorts of wonder weapons if you fight China for us. Don’t worry, victory is assured. We shall stay with you till the end.”

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
Jan 14, 2024 2:13 AM

If Taiwan want to be a Western country and a member of EU and NATO with green lgbt clima freedom, they must fight for it against the axis of evilness.

SusanD
SusanD
Jan 13, 2024 10:48 PM

In 1988 I visited Taiwan on business, I worked for a shipping company. I visited Taipei, Keelung, and Kaohsiung. I ate a lot of strange food.
 
I’m surprised this article never mentioned Kaohsiung, a big and strategically-positioned shipping port. It is an important contributor to Taiwan’s income and wealth.
 
And if the Taiwan people do not mention the Kuomintang Chinese nationalist people who escaped mainland China during the Chinese Civil War, with their historical artifacts (now on display at the National Palace Museum in Taipei), it is certainly not a case of out-of-sight-out-of-mind. The Museum’s collection cannot be seen in several days, so massive is it.

Emily Durron
Emily Durron
Jan 13, 2024 6:25 PM

I didn’t get to the end. I got lost at the point that the writer revealed that they had not the slightest knowledge of what had caused Taiwan to become a separate entity from the rest of China.

If you don’t know that it was all one whole, but then Chiang-Kai Shek’s government and army retreated to there as the last defensible outpost in the face of having lost the civil war and communist revolution, and then claimed to have created a new independent state, then you have no idea.

The whole point is that.

Johan Eddebo
Johan Eddebo
Jan 14, 2024 3:12 AM
Reply to  Emily Durron

“… not the slightest knowledge of what had caused Taiwan to become a separate entity  …”

Everyone knows this. It doesn’t need to be repeated. What made you feel I somehow negated this fact?

Jin_Tonic
Jin_Tonic
Jan 13, 2024 11:57 AM

Crazy start to 2024.

New Moon ritual.

Kat out of the bag (Kat Williams) telling people, 47 million views so far, what they already knew about getting buggered in holly weird to make it.

tunnel gate:  Chabad Lubavitch World Headquarters Tunnels Under 770 Eastern Parkway in Crown Heights,

and after spending 2022/23 blaming the poor, blaming the migrants scape-goat from covid.
as house of cards president started..
when in doubt the threat of war in election year.

Yeman.

and Just think less than 2 years ago in West, you can get arrested for not wearing a mask.
Banned from public places for not having a mask or vaccination qr code on your phone.
disallowed emergency treatment for refusing a covid test shoved up your nose.



george bernard shaw
george bernard shaw
Jan 13, 2024 6:48 PM
Reply to  Jin_Tonic

Good, clear example of a fatuous young person.

Edwige
Edwige
Jan 13, 2024 11:50 AM

“practically every single one of the advanced semiconductors used in the manufacturing of state-of-the-art microchips, arguably the world’s single most important piece of technology, are manufactured by just one Taiwanese company, the TSMC.”

This is one of those inconvenient facts that makes no sense within a conventional geo-political paradigm. If the world works as we’re told, every major power would want its own capability of producing such vital tech. However in a globalist crypto-government paradigm it makes perfect sense – not so much for the cheap labour but because it creates a potental choke-point for when TPTB want to put a foot on the world’s throat.

BTW here in the UK we had a mild week for Christmas and of course the MSM were proclaiming it was proof of climate armageddon, for example:
https://www.vox.com/culture/24001256/snow-winter-climate-change-solastalgia-warming
Now we’re enterring the second week of a cold snap (by UK standards) and the MSM silence is deafening….

SeamusPadraig
SeamusPadraig
Jan 13, 2024 3:48 PM
Reply to  Edwige

Very astute, Edwige. On the other hand, if the TPTB actually want a war leading to the West’s collapse, then it all makes perfect sense.

NickM
NickM
Jan 14, 2024 10:37 AM
Reply to  Edwige

I suspect your leading quote is out of date, or soon will be. China is already manufacturing its own chips — thus neatly escaping both the TSMC noose in Taiwan and the ASML noose in Holland. These semiconductor monopolies now regret the loss of their biggest customer.

Also, I credit Chinese diplomacy with enough subtlety to draw Taiwan back into the fold. Ukraine’s fate being a powerful warning of what happens to little countries that listen to siren voices from the EU$A.

Johnny
Johnny
Jan 13, 2024 8:32 AM

Report from New Zealand.

You will all be pleased as punch that she who will remain nameless has just got married.
Under police guard no less:

‘Police met with a small group of protesters who had plastered a wall with dozens of anti-vaccination posters outside the venue’

More here:
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-01-13/ex-nz-pm-jacinda-ardern-gets-married/103317272

Poor bugger. Bet he’s second IC.

Johnny
Johnny
Jan 13, 2024 9:33 AM
Reply to  Johnny

“Clarke! Clarke!”
(that’s the poor bugger).
“My cucumber sandwich has gone soggy and my martini is too warm!”

“Yes dear. I’ll fix that immediately”
“Immediately isn’t soon enough!”
“Yes dear” (Sound of running and puffing).

George Mc
George Mc
Jan 13, 2024 11:20 AM
Reply to  Johnny

He won’t survive the wedding night. Don’t praying mantises devour their mates?

Clutching at straws
Clutching at straws
Jan 13, 2024 1:02 PM
Reply to  George Mc

He’ll be lucky to survive the monster salami “she”s packing.

george bernard shaw
george bernard shaw
Jan 13, 2024 6:49 PM
Reply to  Johnny

She’s a boy, isn’t she?

Raoullo
Raoullo
Jan 13, 2024 7:58 AM

You write that “perhaps Taiwan’s best option really is to not rock the boat any further.”

Although I don’t disagree, I’m astonished that anyone who would have a modicum of geostrategic and historical acumen would be anything less than absolutely certain that the current Western-backed rachetting up of tensions in the Taiwan Strait is not in these people’s interest!

Name one country that the Anglo-American hegemon has used in the last 50 years that has benefited from Western ‘rules-based order?’ perhaps Afghanistan? How about Iraq? Lybia, Syria, Ukraine? For all those foolish or unlucky enough to find themselves at the receiving end of American ‘philanthropy’ and protection, it has been nothing but an unmitigated disaster!

There’s also the very significant legal context according to which Taiwan is universally recognized as a Chinese province! Why should it be controversial that China asserts its sovereign right over its own territory? Could you imagine a situation where the roles are reversed? Say for example, that China was arming and financially supporting a separatist movement in California and hushering in a government whose mandate is to secede from the Union? Do you think there would be a lot of ifs and ‘buts then?

It’s almost as if, all pundits were mentally-conditioned to act as if the US and the West had some sort of divine right to flaunt any and all human right conventions and international laws, as they’ve repeatedly done throughout the modern era, and most recently in their supporting genocide in Palestine and the bombing of Yemen!

I believe the best thing to say regarding Taiwan is that it’s being set up as a battering ram to destabilise and destroy China’s economy and vile Western elites will pat themselves on the back that their economy will benefit from this, Taiwan be damned, as it won’t be their citizenry–or sons and daughters–that’ll be incinerated by the thousands!

Johan Eddebo
Johan Eddebo
Jan 14, 2024 3:25 AM
Reply to  Raoullo

No, I think this is entirely true.

Reading some of the MSM articles ahead of and after the election, your points are very clearly mirrored in the negative sense.

The framing is of Taiwan as a struggling democracy beset by overbearing Chinese aggression, which now heroically has managed to make its true, pure, democratic and West-aligned voice heard, for which it is likely to pay a dear price, and which we must prevent by deterring China by any means necessary.

Martin Usher
Martin Usher
Jan 13, 2024 6:02 AM

Its amazing in a way how history gets revised to suit national ideology. The government of the Republic of China retreated temporarily to Taiwan in 1949 and regarded itself as the caretaker government of all China that would step back in to take the place of the PRC government once that government collapsed. This ROC fiction continued up to the early 70s when Realpolitik took over and the PRC became “China” leaving Taiwan in a somewhat ambiguous situation. To a large extent the Cold Warriors are still running the show, they’d like nothing more than to arm the place to the teeth to confront the PRC in that Giant Global Game of Risk that they live for. This isn’t the way to peace or progress, its just a way to waste time and resources. Taiwan is part of China, it always has been give or take a colonial adventure or two, and it will eventually become part of China again. I don’t expect an invasion or political takeover, just an inevitable drift caused by a common culture, language and heritage and close business ties.

underground poet
underground poet
Jan 13, 2024 12:24 PM
Reply to  Martin Usher

Expect the unexpected, as China has announced that every day in 2024, they will patrol the waters around the South China Sea and Taiwan and harass or even arrest fishing boats from foreign country’s who violate their rules based order.

You do that for a year w/o obstruction and an invasion looks inviting. And opps, it will come as a big surprise to the military somehow who now has to back down or explain to the citizens we have to confront China and so the rerun of the roaring 20’s party, is over.

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
Jan 14, 2024 1:56 AM

US is defending freedom and democracy all over the world, and we cannot allow China to harass and arrest fishing boat’s freedom of navigation in free International waterways.

US will forever and always fight for average Joe and his freedom!

Kalen
Kalen
Jan 13, 2024 4:35 AM

Few observations.

Author colorful description of supposed small business self sustained economy is quite deceiving as Taiwan would have been total disaster if not by massive pumping of mostly US western investments that keep them afloat. Taiwan itself is economically unviable at current level of population and dependency on outside. It is a creature of post colonial west.

Anyone from outside who dares to write about China and that includes Taiwan must not ignore past as the past lives in cultural, social and political dimension of whole today’s China. It is not just history it is living history.

Only from that perspective one can assess political programs and agendas of Taiwanese political parties. For example despite western assertions to the contrary the fact is Nationalist party is now more minimalistic than reunification party that is more maximalistic along lines Chiang Kai-shek whose reunification idea was marching to Beijing and rule over all China including Taiwan.

Also it is a fallacy that US policy of one China since Nixon stopped nationalists and prevented Taiwan from declaring independence. US never wanted independent Taiwan as a state. In fact US ultimate goal was not to protect independent state of Taiwan but to install Taiwan Political puppets in Beijing after communists were defeated. That is the same stand as it was in 1949.

Unrest of 1989 was a part of that plan based on US rejection of force for soft power and dismantling communist grip on power in Beijing from within as it happen in Russia. It was a part of US concocted Chinese reunification plan similar to that executed a year later in Germany where West German political parties completely took over former GDR politics.

Entire Taiwanese political structure is being maintained for sole purpose of being a seed for whole China politics in-waiting envisioned by U.S. ruling elites many decades ago. The recent decade of U.S. belligerent policies against China is nothing but continuation of economic and political destabilization of China to oust communists.

Moreover it is a fallacy to claim that Taiwan is a democratic state, it is a dictatorship exactly like in China despite carefully arranged paraphernalia of democratic process. Good example of that is eradication of any popular socialists, social democrats, or communists whose agenda would have reflected workers rights and real reunification with China on Beijing terms as autonomous province.

In analyzing political reality of today regarding US foreign policy one can’t deny the fact that US policies were always monolithic and continuous for over 240 years as they were aimed at acquiring, maintaining and expanding global hegemony by suppressing any possible challengers like Russia and China or India or Japan etc.,. Nothing has changed except of loss of US ability and capacity to achieve such goals.

Jin_Tonic
Jin_Tonic
Jan 13, 2024 11:40 AM
Reply to  Kalen

Good comment.

Antonym
Antonym
Jan 13, 2024 1:32 AM

Look how Xi Jinping mangled promises to Hong Kong of “one state two systems”: it resulted in one CCP territory with one CCP system. Taiwan has that empty shell as future under Xi.
TSMC is the Golden Goose for all Com or Cap, so who wants to slaughter it out of national egoism? It grew out of Cap, not Com. Xi wants to spend other’s money without making any himself, the old Con trick.
Anyway, a society only busy with money and power is uninteresting.

Martin Usher
Martin Usher
Jan 13, 2024 6:16 AM
Reply to  Antonym

HK is still a state with a different system of government and legal system to the PRC. Its independence has limits, though — just as the UK government wouldn’t tolerate Jersey being used as a jumping off point for formenting political trouble in the UK the Chinese government won’t tolerate any of the color revolution business.

Kalen
Kalen
Jan 13, 2024 7:54 AM
Reply to  Martin Usher

Hong Kong sovereignty limitations are similar to that of EU and NATO states. Must follow decisions and rules imposed from outside.

Johnny
Johnny
Jan 12, 2024 10:49 PM

A fascinating portrait of a country caught between a rock and a hard place.

‘Small businesses make up almost 99% of the private sector, which is extreme.’

‘It seems to me that Taiwan’s market economy is so unregulated that the more visible giants have trouble finding a foothold. Nobody taxes the commerce on the markets or in the little restaurants where every exchange is cash-based. You basically don’t get receipts ‘

Isn’t that how Capitalschism is supposed to work?

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
Jan 12, 2024 11:19 PM
Reply to  Johnny

Love it. Hopefully it will take a long time to break that down.

Joshie
Joshie
Jan 12, 2024 10:34 PM

Interesting article, thanks. Just a small pedant alert, though: it’s Kuomintang, not Koumintang. 🙂

Cloverleaf
Cloverleaf
Jan 12, 2024 9:28 PM

Is that the Goat of Mendes made out of industrial scrap 🥺

Pipe
Pipe
Jan 12, 2024 9:14 PM

White person goes on holiday to a foreign country. Assumes he is morally superior.

Johnny
Johnny
Jan 12, 2024 10:44 PM
Reply to  Pipe

We’re all guilty of that to a degree Pipe, because we get brainwashed by that ugliest of isms: Patriotism.

Jenner
Jenner
Jan 12, 2024 11:07 PM
Reply to  Johnny

Oh look, a woketard, no less. Patriotism can but need not be the last refuge of the scoundrel (Dr Johnson) So when enjoying in 2030 in your 20 square meter flat

  • the full spectrum of 1. LGBT/banned conversion therapy, 2 gig and platform economy, 3 digital ID-CBDC-controlled mandatory jabs running on your DPI, digital public infrastructure surveilling all ALP-Democrat-Labour-SPD unjabbed immi-vader voting fodder too
  • just remember that the Freedom movement rests on a notion of kinship in nations and mutual consultation and trust, ie the patriotism you despise. .
  • or are you one of these Sovereignty was Never Ceded, Always was, always will be Aboriginal Land? Now why would the transnational Woolworths, like Disney in the LGBT area, be attacking heritage, in this case by pulling Australia Day articles from sale?
Johnny
Johnny
Jan 13, 2024 6:29 AM
Reply to  Jenner

So what or who are we allegiant to?
The flag, the anthem, all those who suffered or died in pointless wars, our glorious, conservatively edited/censored history, our our future ‘paradise’ on Earth etc etc?

The Aboriginal people don’t claim ownership. That’s just Right Wing hyperbole. They regarded themselves as custodians of the land for 60,000 plus years. We’ve fucked it up in 200 years. We ARE the exploiters.

Transnationals ‘take the pulse’ of their customers and act according to their profit margins, not their hearts.

Jenner
Jenner
Jan 13, 2024 8:19 AM
Reply to  Johnny

Since when does “allegiant” exist?

Your para.2: the flag, the anthem and history writing never belonged to the Big End of Town (John Howard) alone, ever heard of Humphrey McQueen or Manning Clark?

If you think a significant section of Blaktivism does not claim ownership (Never Ceded Soverignty; Always Was, Always Will Be Aboriginal Land) you have not been watching State propaganda AKA Australian Broadcasting Commission or reading The Age or the SMH enough. Ever heard of Native Title?

“Right wing hyperbole” ? One of your feminist heropersons Gillard, pwo-nouns: she, her, pronounced it HYPER-BOWL”, but I digress. You seem to have no knowledge of UNDRIP and why transnationals are in on it as follow-up on the Memo of Understanding between UN and WEF of 2019.

“Take the pulse”?? You are willing to concede that the normie sheeple have been fooled via the lamestream media into thinking that whereas many died of Covid in 2020 (false) nobody has died of the jab since (false)

So why will you not concede that the selfsame meejah are capable of inducing what you call a “pulse”, i.e self-hating Whiteism such as you clearly display?

:Lastly I am over the post-Keating Noble Savage negrolatry in Godzone: quite simply, there were never enough blacks (watch him get the vapours at this useage) to ruin the landscape until whitefellah arrival 1788. Not for want of trying, they used to do systematic bush burns to keep the roo numbers up.

“Custodians” my ass: tell your fable to some Green commission, you might even get pre-selection for a safe inner-Melbourne seat.

Johnny
Johnny
Jan 13, 2024 10:13 PM
Reply to  Jenner

Collins dictionary:

ADJECTIVE
2. having or displaying constancy, duty, and faithfulness, esp to a ruling body.

Better put your flag at half mast Jenner.
Your logic has died.

Jenner
Jenner
Jan 14, 2024 2:14 AM
Reply to  Johnny

Fair enough for the “allegiant”, I live and learn, word was first recorded in 1605.

So as you are allegiant to aspects of Wokdedom,. answer the rest of what I wrote as well.

I will not be putting any flag at half mast on 26.01, the Red Ensign and the Eureka Flag are more my style.

george bernard shaw
george bernard shaw
Jan 13, 2024 6:54 PM
Reply to  Jenner

What does this mean? Is this some kind of new language that is all the rage amongst the youth of today? Maybe if it were written in standard English it might be read.

Jenner
Jenner
Jan 13, 2024 11:01 PM

Either be specific about your linguistic shortcomings, ie state what you do not comprehend, or get up to speed on Australian politics.

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
Jan 12, 2024 11:17 PM
Reply to  Pipe

So you insinuate we discriminate against the slant eyed yellow rickshaw boiled dog alive eaters. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Pipe
Pipe
Jan 13, 2024 4:27 AM
Reply to  Erik Nielsen

Is that an attempt at a strawman?

Erik Nielsen
Erik Nielsen
Jan 14, 2024 1:30 AM
Reply to  Pipe

I was one of the few who gave you a thumb up. Dont beat your supporters.

Clutching at straws
Clutching at straws
Jan 13, 2024 1:09 PM
Reply to  Erik Nielsen

Boiled alive ? Wow, that is soo 70’s. My purveyor of canine carne makes sure they’re thoroughly beaten to death.

It so improves the texture.

Johan Eddebo
Johan Eddebo
Jan 13, 2024 3:11 AM
Reply to  Pipe

Did I? I thought my point was that we ought to leave the Taiwanese alone to decide their own fate and lay off meddling in their politics to use them as a bludgeon against China.

Thanks for pointing out my glaring white saviour complex

Pipe
Pipe
Jan 13, 2024 4:40 AM
Reply to  Johan Eddebo

Imagine if a Taiwanese person who has never lived in USA or experienced local culture or history did a piece about how bipartisian politics dominates all American people?

Johan Eddebo
Johan Eddebo
Jan 14, 2024 3:09 AM
Reply to  Pipe

Oh, the horror indeed. I’m sure such an individual could never make a valid observation, or support that hypothetical contention (which doesn’t really meaningfully compare to what I wrote).

Reading De la démocratie en Amérique should really piss you off then

David Ho
David Ho
Jan 13, 2024 11:27 AM
Reply to  Johan Eddebo

Unfortunately Taiwan’s media and education is being subverted by the NED and other American influences so the young voter’s decision making processes may not actually reflect their long term best interests but the interests of the USA and their efforts to destroy China. When that destruction begins in earnest the Taiwanese will be destroyed much like the proxy war is destroying Ukraine.
https://youtu.be/6DtLbEa6OX4?si=WR8SLzY3WpidU4jJ

mgeo
mgeo
Jan 14, 2024 4:47 AM
Reply to  Pipe

You are suggesting that people with no knowledge of external history, geography or culture should not be pontificating on other nations, let alone trying to manipulate them. Good luck!

Tim Glass
Tim Glass
Jan 12, 2024 9:01 PM

If only the MSM published articles as well-written as this…

Stephen
Stephen
Jan 13, 2024 7:58 AM
Reply to  Tim Glass

I found it refreshing to read such thoughtful journalism which still left me with food for thought.